CHIN 101
CHIN 101 - Beginning Chinese I

An introductory course that teaches the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis is on pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and communication. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar, and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open only to students with no Chinese language background.

Instructor: Staff

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHIN 102
CHIN 102 - Beginning Chinese II

An introductory course that teaches the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis is on pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and communication. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar, and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 101 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Tang

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHIN 103
CHIN 103 - Advanced Beginning Chinese I

An introductory course that teaches the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis is on pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and communication. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar, and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Placement by the department. Open to students who can speak some Chinese (Mandarin or other Chinese dialects), or who have some knowledge in reading and writing Chinese characters.

Instructor: Zhao

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHIN 104
CHIN 104 - Advanced Beginning Chinese II

An introductory course that teaches the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis is on pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and communication. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar, and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 103 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Zhao

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHIN 201
CHIN 201 - Intermediate Chinese I

Further training in listening comprehension, oral expression, reading, and writing.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 102 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Tang

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHIN 202
CHIN 202 - Intermediate Chinese II

Further training in listening comprehension, oral expression, reading and writing.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 201 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Chen

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHIN 203
CHIN 203 - Advanced Intermediate Chinese I

Further training in listening comprehension, oral expression, reading, and writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites:  CHIN 104 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Chen

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHIN 204
CHIN 204 - Advanced Intermediate Chinese II

Further training in listening comprehension, oral expression, reading, and writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 203 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Tang

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHIN 208
CHIN 208 - Writing Modern China (Eng)

Over the course of the twentieth century, China underwent enormous changes in the sweep of modernization, which opened the door to a wealth of experimentation, especially in literature and culture. The primary focus of this course is to explore how literary forms adapted to the dominant political and cultural movements of modern China. At the same time, individual Chinese writers crafted unique visions from their experiences "on the ground." In works that date from the late Qing to the present, we will explore the varied representations of Chinese modernity, including topics such as the individual and society, revolution and tradition, the countryside and the city, gender and sexuality. No prior knowledge of Chinese literature or Chinese language is required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: M. Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 211
CHIN 211 - Dream of the Red Chamber (Eng)

Variously known in English as Dream of the Red Chamber, A Dream of Red Mansions, and The Story of the Stone, Honglou meng is the most widely discussed Chinese novel of all time. Written in the mid-eighteenth century, the novel offers telling insight into Chinese culture as it once was and as it remains today. The novel is still wildly popular due to its tragic love story, its sensitive depiction of the plight of the talented woman in late imperial culture, and its narrative intricacies. The goal of the course is to understand the novel both as a literary text and as a cultural phenomenon. Optional extra sessions will accommodate those who wish to read and discuss the novel in Chinese.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. Not open to students who have taken CHIN 311.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is also offered at the 300-level as CHIN 311.

CHIN 214
CHIN 214 - Emotions in Ancient China

What are emotions? Are they innate and universal, or do they vary across time, societies, and languages? How do humans express and describe emotions? How should individuals and societies relate to the experience and expression of emotions? Such questions sparked an animated debate among early Chinese thinkers (5th c. BCE–220 CE), a debate we will continue in this course. We begin by surveying ancient and modern theories of emotion. The subsequent unit turns to the representations of different emotions in early Chinese literature and philosophical writings, where we explore whether our experiences of love, joy, and grief are comparable across ancient and modern contexts. In the final unit, we evaluate different philosophical proposals—from Confucian, Daoist, and Legalist lineages—for how to cultivate and regulate emotions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Du

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHIN 220
CHIN 220 - The Fall of the Ming (Eng)

The Ming (1368) was a glorious dynasty, and its fall was “heard round the world." The course approaches its glory and fall through novels (such as The Water Margin and The Plum in a Golden Vase), short stories (by Feng Menglong and others), and dramas like Peach Blossom Fan. Elsewhere in East Asia, too, the Ming was a theme in literature, especially at the time of its fall. Works by Chikamatsu (Japanese) and Ho Kyun (Korean) serve as illustrations. Additionally, dramas from Holland and England provide some measure of the impact of this event in Europe. In the last third of the course we will survey this group of writings by non-Chinese and use them to show how reactions varied, depending on the nationality of the observer. Finally, we will read a Cantonese opera composed in the twentieth century. It is one sign of the topic's continuing currency throughout the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), and it highlights south China's longstanding resistance to the Qing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. Not open to students who have taken CHIN 320.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course is also offered at the 300-level as CHIN 320.

CHIN 226
CHIN 226 - City in Modern Chinese Lit & Film (Eng)

This seminar will focus on one of the most important topics of modern Chinese culture: the urban imagination. Analyzing how metropolis and urban life are represented and imagined is central to an understanding of the differently articulated forms Chinese modernity has taken throughout the twentieth century. We will examine the literary and visual representations of the city in modern China through close analyses of the novels, short stories, films, photographs, and paintings that illuminate Chinese urbanism. Cultural manifestations of such Chinese metropolises as Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Taipei will be extensively discussed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Not open to students who have taken CHIN 326.

Instructor: M. Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is also offered at the 300 level as CHIN 326.

CHIN 233
CHIN 233 - Masterworks of Chinese Fiction

Of China's six great novels, four (Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Outlaws of the Marsh, Journey to the West, and Plum in the Golden Vase) were products of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).  What were the reasons for this important new development in Chinese literature?  They include new patterns in consumption and publishing, among other factors.  And how did this development lead to the emergence of a theory of the novel in the mid-seventeenth century?  Here we will seek to understand the approaches of major theorists.  Finally, how do the four masterworks contrast with the Chinese short story, which underwent a parallel advance at exactly the same time? The difference between complex and simple plots will be our key to an answer.  We will spend two to three weeks on each of the four novels then conclude with a look at some short stories.  Readings and discussions will be in English. Optional sessions discussing short selections of each novel in Chinese will be offered intermittently.  

Two short papers, one short report, and one final paper are required.  No prerequisites for entering the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: The course is also offered at the 200-level as CHIN 233.

CHIN 236
CHIN 236 - China on the Silver Screen

This course introduces students to the Chinese cultural and literary tradition through the lens of modern reception and cinematic representation. Beginning with Confucius and ending with the last emperor of the imperial period (221 BCE–1911 CE), we will explore key historical turning points, influential philosophical works, and major literary genres. By pairing historical writings (in English translation) with iconic blockbusters and arthouse films, students will analyze in what ways and to what ends film adaptations transform their source materials. We will also delve into the complex and often fraught relationships between the past and present in contemporary Sinophone contexts.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Du

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHIN 239
CHIN 239 - Pop Culture in Modern China

This course provides a comprehensive examination of modern Chinese popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong from the late Qing to the present. From literature to film, from martial romance to science fiction, from theater to music, this course will probe popular culture as it has manifested itself, and trace its sociopolitical, aesthetic, and affective impact on modern China. Students are required to actively participate in class discussions and under the guidance of the instructor, design and conduct their own research projects to explore some extra dimensions of Chinese popular culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: M. Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 242
CHIN 242 - Supernatural China

Confucius in the Analects asserts that “The Master never spoke of the strange, the violent, the disorderly, and the numinous.” Yet “recording the strange” was a thriving literary genre in classical and imperial China—one collection of supernatural tales was in fact entitled What the Master Never Spoke Of. How do we understand this contradiction? This course is a survey of stories and essays on ghosts, spirits, talking animals, and spooky events, beginning from the earliest Chinese writings incised on turtle shells to the twentieth century. We will examine changing worldviews and religious practices during these three millennia, retracing the storylines retold around East Asia and across media ancient and modern.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Du

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHIN 243
CAMS 203/ CHIN 243 - Chinese Cinema (in Eng)

This course explores the cinematic conventions and experiments employed by Chinese filmmakers over the past hundred years. Unique Chinese film genres such as left-wing melodrama, martial arts films and model play adaptations, as well as the three "new waves" in China's recent avant-garde cinema, will be examined and discussed. Individual filmic visions and techniques experimented with by important directors such as Fei Mu, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Zhang Yimou, and Jia Zhangke will be closely analyzed. Class discussions will aim to help students understand the history, politics, and aesthetics of Chinese cinema. Theoretical aspects of film studies will also be incorporated into class readings and discussions. No prior knowledge of China or film studies is required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 20 3

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: M. Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 244
CHIN 244 - Classical Chinese Theater (Eng)

This course covers three basic categories of traditional theater in China. It begins with the short form known as zaju of the Yuan Dynasty (thirteenth to the fourteenth centuries), when dramatic works began to be written by identifiable authors. Next come the long and elaborate chuanqi (or kunqu) of the Ming and Qing Dynasties (fourteenth to twentieth centuries), including the still performed Peony Pavilion by Tang Xianzu. The last category is Peking opera, a form that originated during the second half of the Qing Dynasty, around 1790, and is regularly performed today. Most of our dramas were written by men, but we will also look at a few by women. The interrelation between forms will be discussed, as will the effects of the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76 on Peking opera and other opera forms. Lastly such perennial themes as Mulan and The White Snake will be surveyed. This course may be taken as CHIN 244 or, with additional assignments as CHIN 344.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. Not open to students who have taken CHIN 344.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course is also offered at the 300-level as CHIN 344.

CHIN 245
CHIN 245 - Chinese Women Revol. (Eng)

The period 1850-1950 witnessed five political revolutions in China. Each one had an impact on the status of women. By the end of the hundred years, the stay-at-home, bound-footed gentlewoman was no more, and old-style dreams in which women changed gender to pursue careers or fight wars had faded away. Instead a whole new reality for women had emerged. This course explores these changes through the writings of male sympathizers, western missionaries, and most importantly Chinese women themselves. In bridging the “late imperial” and “modern” eras and in its emphasis on women’s voices, it offers a distinctive take on the period under review. Although the story is Chinese, it is a part of women’s history worldwide.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. Not open to students who have taken CHIN 345.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: This course is also offered at the 300-level as CHIN 345.

CHIN 250
CHIN 250 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

CHIN 250H
CHIN 250H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHIN 301
CHIN 301 - Advanced Chinese I

This course is designed to further expand students' comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Reading materials will be selected from newspapers, short stories, essays, and films. Students will study Chinese and China from different perspectives. In addition to authentic audio and videotapes, Chinese learning APPs will also be used as study aids. The class is conducted in Chinese.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 202 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Zhao

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHIN 302
CHIN 302 - Advanced Chinese II

Advanced language skills are further developed through reading, writing, and discussions. Reading materials will be selected from a variety of authentic Chinese texts. Students will study Chinese and China from different perspectives. In addition to authentic audio and videotapes, Chinese learning APPs will also be used as study aids. The class is conducted in Chinese.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 301 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Zhao

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHIN 303
CHIN 303 - Business Chinese

This course uses readings and audio-visual materials that investigate business activities in Mandarin-speaking environment to further expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Students’ Chinese language competence and cross-culture awareness will grow through language studies that focus on communicative practices and business-related tasks.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 302 or CHIN 204 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Foti

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 306
CHIN 306 - Adv Reading 20th C Lit & Culture

This course is designed to further expand and refine students' language skills through intensive reading of authentic Chinese materials, such as novels, short stories, essays, and plays and through viewing of contemporary Chinese films. Particular attention will be paid to increasing levels of literary appreciation and to enriching understanding of the sociocultural contexts from which our readings have emerged.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 204 or CHIN 302 or placement by the department.; students entering the course through CHIN 301 are strongly encouraged to first complete CHIN 302 as well.

Instructor: Chen

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHIN 311
CHIN 311 - Dream of the Red Chamber (Eng)

Variously known in English as Dream of the Red Chamber, A Dream of Red Mansions, and The Story of the Stone, Honglou meng is the most widely discussed Chinese novel of all time. Written in the mid-eighteenth century, the novel offers telling insight into Chinese culture as it once was and as it remains today. The novel is still wildly popular due to its tragic love story, its sensitive depiction of the plight of the talented woman in late imperial culture, and its narrative intricacies. The goal of the course is to understand the novel both as a literary text and as a cultural phenomenon. Optional extra sessions will accommodate those who wish to read and discuss the novel in Chinese. This course may be taken as CHIN 211 or, with additional assignments, as CHIN 311.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: One previous course on Chinese history or culture. Not open to students who have taken CHIN 211.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is also offered at the 200-level as CHIN 211.

CHIN 320
CHIN 320 - The Fall of the Ming (Eng)

The Ming (1368) was a glorious dynasty, and its fall was “heard round the world." The course approaches its glory and fall through novels (such as The Water Margin and The Plum in a Golden Vase), short stories (by Feng Menglong and others), and dramas like Peach Blossom Fan. Elsewhere in East Asia, too, the Ming was a theme in literature, especially at the time of its fall. Works by Chikamatsu (Japanese) and Ho Kyun (Korean) serve as illustrations. Additionally, dramas from Holland and England provide some measure of the impact of this event in Europe. In the last third of the course we will survey this group of writings by non-Chinese and use them to show how reactions varied, depending on the nationality of the observer. Finally, we will read a Cantonese opera composed in the twentieth century. It is one sign of the topic's continuing currency throughout the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), and it highlights south China's longstanding resistance to the Qing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None. Not open to students who have taken CHIN 220.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course is also offered at the 200-level as CHIN 220.

CHIN 326
CHIN 326 - City in Modern Chin Lit & Film (Eng)

This seminar will focus on one of the most important topics of modern Chinese culture: the urban imagination. Analyzing how metropolis and urban life are represented and imagined is central to an understanding of the differently articulated forms Chinese modernity has taken throughout the twentieth century. We will examine the literary and visual representations of the city in modern China through close analyses of the novels, short stories, films, photographs, and paintings that illuminate Chinese urbanism. Cultural manifestations of such Chinese metropolises as Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Taipei will be extensively discussed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One course at the 200 or 300 level in East Asian languages and literatures, East Asian arts, history, philosophy, or religion. Not open to students who have taken CHIN 226.

Instructor: M. Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is also offered at the 200-level as CHIN 226.

CHIN 333
CHIN 333 - Masterworks of Chinese Fiction

Of China's six great novels, four (Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Outlaws of the Marsh, Journey to the West, and Plum in the Golden Vase) were products of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).  What were the reasons for this important new development in Chinese literature?  They include new patterns in consumption and publishing, among other factors.  And how did this development lead to the emergence of a theory of the novel in the mid-seventeenth century?  Here we will seek to understand the approaches of major theorists.  Finally, how do the four masterworks contrast with the Chinese short story, which underwent a parallel advance at exactly the same time? The difference between complex and simple plots will be our key to an answer.  We will spend two to three weeks on each of the four novels then conclude with a look at some short stories.  Readings and discussions will be in English. Optional sessions discussing short selections of each novel in Chinese will be offered intermittently.  Compared to CHIN 233, this course will have one extra paper and one extra report.

Three short papers, two short reports, and one final paper are required. Students should have taken one previous course in Chinese culture or history.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: The course is also offered at the 200-level as CHIN 233.

CHIN 338
CHIN 338 - Reading in Modern Chinese Lit

This course guides students to explore Chinese literary modernity through authentic literary texts written by major Chinese writers of the past hundred years. It aims to give students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of modern China in both its historical and cultural practice. Instead of language training, literary and cultural analyses will be emphasized. Class discussions will be conducted in Chinese, and students are expected to offer their critical responses to readings through oral presentations and papers written in Chinese.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 306 and CHIN 307, or placement by the department.

Instructor: M. Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHIN 344
CHIN 344 - Classical Chinese Theater (Eng)

This course covers three basic categories of traditional theater in China. It begins with the short form known as zaju of the Yuan Dynasty (thirteenth to the fourteenth centuries), when dramatic works began to be written by identifiable authors. Next come the long and elaborate chuanqi (or kunqu) of the Ming and Qing Dynasties (fourteenth to twentieth centuries), including the still performed performed Peony Pavilion by Tang Xianzu. The last category is Peking opera, a form that originated during the second half of the Qing Dynasty, around 1790, and is regularly performed today. Most of our dramas were written by men, but we will also look at a few by women. The interrelation between forms will be discussed, as will the effects of the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76 on Peking opera and other opera forms. Lastly such perennial themes as Mulan and The White Snake will be surveyed. This course may be taken as CHIN 244 or, with additional assignments as CHIN 344.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: One previous course in Chinese history or culture. Not open to students who have taken CHIN 244.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course is also offered at the 200-level as CHIN 244.

CHIN 345
CHIN 345 - Chinese Women Revol. (Eng)

The period 1850-1950 witnessed five political revolutions in China. Each one had an impact on the status of women. By the end of the hundred years, the stay-at-home, bound-footed gentlewoman was no more, and old-style dreams in which women changed gender to pursue careers or fight wars had faded away. Instead a whole new reality for women had emerged. This course explores these changes through the writings of male sympathizers, western missionaries, and most importantly Chinese women themselves. In bridging the “late imperial” and “modern” eras and in its emphasis on women's voices, it offers a distinctive take on the period under review. Although the story is Chinese, it is a part of women's history worldwide. Additional reading and writings will be assigned to students with advanced-level Chinese reading proficiency. This course may be taken as CHIN 245 or, with additional assignments, as CHIN 345.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: One prior course in EALC, EAS or WGST. Not open to student who have taken CHIN 245.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: This course is also offered at the 200-level as CHIN 245.

CHIN 350
CHIN 350 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHIN 350H
CHIN 350H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHIN 360
CHIN 360 - Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CHIN 370
CHIN 370 - Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CHIN 381
CHIN 381 - Eileen Chang (Eng)

This seminar offers an intensive study of the writings of Eileen Chang, one of the most important Chinese writers. Close analysis of her literary style will be combined with discussions on such key concepts of the Chinese literary modernity: gender, nation, cosmopolitanism, affectivity, subjectivity, and diaspora. Her major works will be read in biographical, historical and cultural contexts, with considerations of the classical novels influencing her as well as the modern and postmodern writers and filmmakers working under her influences.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One course at the 200 or 300 level on Chinese literature, history or culture, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: M. Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHIN 382
CHIN 382 - Sem: Sci Fi & Future of China

This seminar guides students to explore the political, cultural, and epistemological changes represented in Chinese science fiction. It contextualizes the genre’s evolution in the intellectual history of modern China, where imagining the future of China is often the focus of contending ideologies and intellectual trends. The course introduces students to three booms of Chinese science fiction, which all happened when China went through drastic changes. The contemporary new wave of science fiction particularly presents a subversive vision of China’s pursuit of power and wealth, a dystopian counterpart to the government-promoted “Chinese dream.” This course examines the cutting-edge literary experiments that characterize the new wave, and studies the transgression of gender, class, and nation in science fiction that evokes sensations ranging from the uncanny to the sublime, from the corporeal to the virtual, and from the apocalyptic to the transcendent.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One course at the 200 or 300 level on Chinese literature, history or culture, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: M. Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: