WRIT 107
WRIT 107 - ARTH 100 Intro Art & Histories

Why does art matter? Because images, sculptures and buildings shape our ways of understanding our world and ourselves. Learning how to look closely and analyze what you see, therefore, is fundamental to a liberal arts education. Within a global frame, this course provides an introduction to art and its histories through a series of case studies, from Egypt's Queen Nefertiti to Jean-Michel Basquiat's raw street art. Meeting three times weekly, each section will draw on the case studies to explore concepts of gender and race, cultural appropriation, political propaganda, and other issues. Assignments focus on developing analytical and expressive writing skills and will engage with the rich resources of Wellesley College and of Boston's art museums. The course fulfills both the Writing requirement and the ARTH 100 requirement for art history, architecture, and studio majors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Lynn-Davis (Art)

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: This course satisfies the First-Year Writing requirement and counts as a unit toward the major in Art History, Architecture, or Studio Art. Includes a third session each week.

WRIT 116
WRIT 116 - Writing in the Distracted Age

We are living in an age of unprecedented access to information and have the means for immediate communication, thanks to advances in technology. Connecting to this virtual, ceaselessly changing world, however, often means turning away from the physical realm and prioritizing immediate reaction over thoughtful reflection. In this interdisciplinary course, we will investigate the boundless opportunities, and the real challenges, of living and writing in the age of distraction. How do we understand one another and ourselves as we toggle between the virtual and physical worlds? How do we create meaningful ideas and united communities? How does the reading and writing we do in the classroom inform what we read and write on social media, and vice versa? Students will consider these questions as they study literature, art, psychology, and technology, and as they explore both virtual spaces and physical ones, including the Wellesley campus and other area locales.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Bryant (Writing Program)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course will provide extra academic support and intensive preparation for the demands of writing at the college level. It is appropriate for students who have not done much academic writing in English in high school, or who lack confidence in their writing. No letter grades given.

WRIT 120
WRIT 120 - Critical Interpretation

This course introduces students to a level of interpretative sophistication and techniques of analysis essential not just in literary study but in all courses that demand advanced engagement with language. In active discussions, students perform detailed readings of poetry drawn from a range of historical periods, with the aim of developing an understanding of the richness and complexity of poetic language and of connections between form and content, text, and cultural and historical context. The reading varies from section to section, but all sections involve learning to read closely and to write persuasively and elegantly. WRIT 120 satisfies both the First-Year Writing requirement and the Critical Interpretation requirement of the English major.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Wall-Randall (Fall); Whitaker (Spring)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: This course satisfies both the First-Year Writing requirement and the Critical Interpretation requirement of the English major.

WRIT 127
WRIT 127 - Writing for Change

How have writers and artists in the U.S. used the power of words, images, and sound to promote social change? We will explore this question by examining an array of texts within their specific cultural contexts,  including abolitionist narratives, intersectional feminist theory, and contemporary art from the Davis Museum. Students will analyze the rhetorical strategies of these works of protest literature, assessing their influence on laws, social practices, and cultural values. Students will also practice protest as they explore the possibilities and limits of writing with a purpose in America today.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: E. Battat

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course will provide extra academic support and intensive preparation for the demands of writing at the college level. Section 01 is appropriate for students who have not done much academic writing in English in high school, or who lack confidence in their writing. Section 02 is reserved for students participating in the Wellesley Plus Program. No letter grades given.

WRIT 128
WRIT 128 - Writing About Food and Culture

This course will start with the premise that food is an essential ingredient in the making of selves, families, communities, regions, and nations. We will explore the ways that we celebrate food traditions, create new habits and tastes, and also respond to food problems (e.g. food scarcity and safety, climate change and land use, and the complex networks of food producers, servers, and consumers). Our readings will draw from a variety of different fields and perspectives, including literature, history, anthropology, and environmental studies, as well as various genres of food writing - the personal essay, the recipe, food blogs and podcasts, and scholarly essays on the intersections between food and culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Brubaker (Writing Program)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course will provide extra academic support and intensive preparation for the demands of writing at the college level. No letter grades given.

WRIT 130
WRIT 130 - What is College For?

As college in the US becomes increasingly expensive and competitive, it’s worth asking what role institutions of higher education play in our society. Do they promote equity and equality? Do they transform or preserve the status quo? Do we prioritize their value as a private or as a public good, that is, as something that benefits the individual, or as something that the public invests in for some broader social goal? Students will read and write about the work of political theorists and educators in order to consider what the political and social mission of the university should be. We will also investigate the business of higher education, examining what happens when a college’s financial considerations might conflict with its educational mission. Other topics we’ll explore include the public financing of college, student debt, practices of for-profit universities, and the size of college endowments.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Krontiris (Writing Program)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course will provide extra academic support and intensive preparation for the demands of writing at the college level. It is appropriate for students who have not done much academic writing in English in high school, or who lack confidence in their writing. No letter grades given.

WRIT 131
WRIT 131 - Politics of Private Property

What do we rightfully own as individuals, and what do we owe to the common good? Who should pay for education, healthcare, childcare, and stewardship of the environment? As current debate about the accumulation and concentration of private wealth heats up, it seems more important than ever to try to answer these questions. In this course, we’ll start by studying the political implications of taxing private capital. Does raising income taxes punish ambitious people, or does it correct for systemic inequalities in capitalism? We’ll then study some foundational political and philosophical theories about how to distribute resources fairly within a capitalist system. We will also use these ideas to evaluate pressing questions in US policy regarding which goods and resources should be considered private and which should be publicly owned, funded, or managed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Krontiris (Writing Program)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WRIT 133
WRIT 133 - Problem of Women and Work

American women often hear messages that they can "have it all"--a meaningful career, a loving family, and a fulfilling personal life. Yet popular culture is also filled with images of working mothers as stressed-out and miserable. In this course we will examine the highly varied aspirations, opportunities, and experiences of American women as they relate to work. We will consider some of the advice high-powered professional women have given to college graduates looking to advance their careers and "balance" that ambition with family life. We will read memoirs of low-wage earners, including many single mothers, about the particular challenges they face, and the limits that discrimination and systemic inequities place on their personal and professional goals. We will also explore what social scientists have to say about how cultural norms and economic markets generate the opportunities and constraints that women face. Finally, we will analyze how public policy at the local and national level influences the choices women and families face, and how those choices affect society more broadly.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Velenchik

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WRIT 134
WRIT 134 - American Migration Myths

The United States has defined itself as an exceptional “nation of immigrants” whose easy access to citizenship and democratic pluralism sets it apart from the rest of the world. But is this really true? How do the history of slavery, colonization, nativism, and the militarization of the border complicate this narrative of inclusion? How do migrants who are not European, white, and Christian tell different kinds of stories about their encounters with America? Students will analyze fiction, memoir, museum exhibits, policy briefs, and scholarly histories to understand how American immigration narratives have influenced public policy, social attitudes, and the meaning of “America” today.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: E. Battat

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WRIT 136
WRIT 136 - Staging Science

We will read a range of twentieth-century plays that depict various scientific disciplines, discoveries, controversies, and characters. We will explore how scientific themes and ideas shape the structure and performances of these plays and also what these plays tell us about the connections-and misperceptions-between the humanities and sciences. Through plays such as Michael Frayn's Copenhagen, Tom Stoppard's Arcadia, David Auburn's Proof, and David Feldshuh's Miss Evers' Boys, we will consider, for example, the intersections of science and politics, ethical responsibility, scientific racism, the gendering of scientific fields and practices, the myth of the lone scientist, and the overlaps between scientific and artistic creation. This course will likely offer the opportunity to attend a local performance of a play.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Brubaker (Writing Program)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WRIT 140
WRIT 140 - Romantic Comedy

"Boy meets girl" has long been a classic starting point, in both literature and the movies. This course will focus on romantic comedy in American cinema, with significant looks backward to its literary sources. We will view films from the classic era of Hollywood (It Happened One Night, The Lady Eve), the revisionist comedies of the 1970s and beyond (Annie Hall, My Best Friend's Wedding), and perhaps some of the decidedly unromantic comedies of recent years (Knocked Up). We will also read one or two Shakespeare plays, and a Jane Austen novel, to get a sense of the literary precedents that established the paradigms within which cinematic comedy operates.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Shetley (English)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing; WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring; Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WRIT 143
WRIT 143 - The Mystery of Beowulf

This course explores the magnificent and enigmatic medieval poem Beowulf. Beowulf mirrors its culture - as we will see through the hero who embodies his fierce and individualistic age, the monster who attacks that hero and all he stands for, and the women and mothers who challenge the dominant culture and its values. Surviving in a single manuscript, this evocative tale was almost lost to time. Intensifying the poem's mystery, some passages are burned, smudged, and hard to decipher. But the message of endurance in the face of unimaginable adversity continues to resonate with readers today. We will compare modern English translations of the poem and consider the small and large ways in which these retellings vary depending on the sex or nationality of the translator. We will also study two contemporary Beowulf films, deepening our understanding of the poem’s longstanding influence, and its meaning in its own time and ours.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Lynch

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

WRIT 144
WRIT 144 - What's in A Name?

Behind every name there is a story. In this course, we will explore those stories, learning the history and meaning of the labels that we affix to people, places, and things. We will pay particular attention to the power, responsibility, and consequences that come with naming, re-naming, name-erasing, and name-calling. We will examine current controversies on college campuses involving the names of departments, buildings, monuments, mascots, dictionaries, and other works. We will also study how the producers of all kinds of things–from poems to consumer products–use metaphor and neologism to refresh our understanding of the familiar, introduce us to the unfamiliar, and name the unnameable. In addition, we will explore how names and name changes can frame political discourse, sway opinion, influence behavior, and alter history.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Johnson (Writing Program)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WRIT 146
WRIT 146 - Alternative Worlds

We will read a diverse range of modern science fiction stories with an aim toward understanding how these texts represent, critique, and imagine alternatives to existing social, political, economic, and environmental conditions. Through stories by writers such as Ray Bradbury, Samuel Delany, Octavia Butler, Nnedi Okorafor, and Ted Chiang, we will explore how science fiction reimagines and challenges traditional ideas about ourselves, complicating easy distinctions between mind and body, human and machine, alien and native, self and other.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Brubaker (Writing Program)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WRIT 155
WRIT 155 - The Selfie in American Life

This course will examine how the rapid-fire pace of technology is changing the way we see ourselves, the way we present ourselves to the world, and our fundamental understanding of our relation to the world around us. Through the use of social media platforms like Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter, Vine, Pinterest, Yik Yak, Tinder, Hinge, Instagram, and Tumblr, to name just a few, we are all constantly forming and reforming our identities, thereby changing the nature of human experience. By altering the course of our lives, we are reformulating the age-old questions: How do we discover who we are? How do we show the world who we are? We will read a series of books, traditional and untraditional, by discovered and undiscovered authors, to analyze the way this seismic shift is being documented and portrayed in fiction and non-fiction.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Bryant (Writing Program)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course. Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WRIT 160
WRIT 160 - Magic of Everyday Life

Fascinating cultural practices are found not only in far-off places but are also embedded in the stories of our everyday lives. From our families and friends to taxi drivers and grocery clerks, everyone's personal history has something to teach us. Written accounts of culture (called ethnographies) are created from these narratives of how people live their lives. What extraordinary stories of culture are hidden in local, everyday places? What does it mean to write someone else's story? Or our own? What can we learn about culture by translating oral histories into words? With the understanding that some of the most interesting stories about human culture are told in our own backyards, we will approach writing through ethnographic storytelling, using our life experiences as our subject.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Armstrong (Writing Program)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course. Wendy Judge Paulson '69 Ecology of Place Living Laboratory course. This course does not satisfy the Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory requirement. Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WRIT 165
WRIT 165 - China Past and Present

Eighteenth-century China was at the center of global transformations. From Bangkok to Boston, consumers demanded its teas and textiles. Chinese armies drove deep into Central Asia, conquering new territories. Population growth propelled a form of economic development that would leave modern legacies of extraordinary political and environmental challenges. Our course investigates these breathtaking changes and critically assesses their legacies for the present. Topics include family life and gender, rulership and territorial expansion in Tibet, environmental transformation, and long-term trends in Western perceptions of China. Assignments emphasize strong analytical writing through interpretation of primary sources, critical thinking about links between past and present, and independent research. Course materials (in English or subtitled): translated novels, emperors' personal writings, television dramas, European/American accounts, and innovative historical studies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Giersch (History)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: No letter grades given. Mandatory Credit/Non Credi

WRIT 168
WRIT 168 - Hoaxes and Conspiracies

Long before the rise of “fake news” and “alternative facts”, there have been many examples of the power of media to misinform audiences and distort reality. To understand our vulnerability to these forces, this class examines a series of key historical episodes: 1. the 1938 War of the Worlds radio hoax; 2. the rise of propaganda in advertising and governance during the first half of the twentieth century; 3. recent disinformation campaigns and conspiracies related to tobacco, vaccines, and other science and health matters; and 4. the “unfiltered” social media world of today. In each unit, we will survey the social science and popular literature for insights, and work collaboratively to build an original understanding of the issues via reflection, evaluation of our own media habits, and research and writing projects. We will critically examine current media literacy efforts, and work towards best practices informed by our research.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Kaliner (Sociology)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit. No letter grades given (fall section only).

WRIT 170
WRIT 170 - Value and Meaning of Work

In this course, we will examine the role that work plays in contemporary life and investigate how the value and experience of working get shaped by modern capitalism. We’ll start by reflecting on the character of the 21st century “gig” economy: Does working now mean something fundamentally different than it did for previous generations? Are we really working harder for less reward, as some argue? Is the recommendation to “pursue your passion” good advice? Next, we’ll examine theoretical perspectives on work, looking at how capitalism shapes the relationship between people and their work, how it structures our relationship to time and leisure, and how it codes certain forms of work as gendered labor. Last, we’ll take up questions about workers’ rights, worker power, and the extent to which we have a responsibility, as a society, to ensure stable and fulfilling work for all. This course asks students to think about the problem of work in both personal and structural terms, considering how it features in their own lives and how it reflects the larger social structures within which our lives play out.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Krontiris (Writing Program)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WRIT 174
WRIT 174 - The Personal is Political

“The personal is political” is a feminist rallying cry. It affirms, among other things, that we act and write out of our subjectivity, and that identity and politics are inseparable. In this course, we will explore our own relationships to sociopolitical matters such as reproductive rights, immigration and migration, prison abolition, environmental justice, and citizenship. We will also investigate the power structures that influence these areas and that make them resistant to meaningful change. Using This Bridge Called My Back: Writings from Radical Women of Color as our inspiration and guide, we will develop the critical thinking and writing skills needed to transform sociopolitical systems and to assert the value of our lives in them.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Instructor: Maurissette

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WRIT 175
WRIT 175 - What is a Gift?

We are supposed to offer gifts without expecting anything in return; we are urged to give our best effort for the good of ourselves and others; we are born with, develop, and use our gifts in a range of contexts. But what, exactly, is a gift? In this course, we will explore perspectives on gifts in literature, religious texts, economic theories, and cultural criticism. We will consider questions such as: Why do we give things away? Are we morally obligated to use our resources or natural talents for the greater good? How do we decide who is worthy of a gift with no strings attached, and who must earn a subsidy or repay a benefactor? How does America’s reliance on philanthropy reinforce structural inequities? How do norms of generosity and reciprocity persist in a culture defined by contracts and debts? Can we imagine a society without money and based instead on a principle of giving?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Moe

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: No letter grades given.

WRIT 176
WRIT 176 - Classics & Modern Social Movements

Perhaps it seems improbable that the literature of the ancient Greeks and Romans would have much relevance to important social issues in our diverse society today. In recent years, however, many of these ancient materials have been adapted to help activists examine and advocate for modern causes. We will start by thinking about reception: How have ancient texts been received by later cultures and groups, and can a reception be “good” or “bad”? What is the difference between reception, adaptation, and appropriation? Then, focusing primarily on works by women and people of color, we will explore recent receptions of classical texts that address issues such as racial justice, feminism, and immigration. Among other works, we will consider Aristophanes’ Lysistrata alongside Spike Lee’s Chi-Raq, and Euripides’ Medea together with Luis Alfaro’s Mojada: A Medea in Los Angeles. No knowledge of ancient Greece or Rome required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Freas (Classical Studies)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit. No letter grades given (fall section only).

WRIT 178
WRIT 178 - Black Feminism & the Future

In this course, we will examine Black feminist essays and speculative fiction as resources for thinking about the future of feminism and its impact on the broader culture. These texts are helping to shift paradigms of what is understood by the term “feminism”. They also contain critical information that students need not just to survive but thrive in the future. We will discuss how these works offer new ways to think about kinship, gender, reproductive rights, abolition, and representations of selfhood. In addition, they will provide a springboard for looking inward to our own lives and perspectives, as we explore how writing, reading, and action are influenced by the personal. Indeed, if the “personal is political,” as Audre Lorde aptly stated, then what we write from our own experience can shape and change our world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open only to first-year students.

Instructor: Maurissette (Writing)

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/NonCredit. No letter grades given (fall section only).

WRIT 179
WRIT 179 - Building a Better World

What makes a world? And what makes a world beautiful, sustainable, inclusive, or just? At a time when humanity faces myriad global challenges, we can seek insight in writing that reimagines the world and helps us change it for the better. Reading the work of activists, philosophers, fiction writers, and political theorists, we will examine how past worlds shape those of the present and future. In particular, we will investigate the dynamics of inclusion and exclusion in these different visions of the world, asking questions such as: Who enjoys freedom, and when? What is a “human right,” and should those rights be the basis of social organization? In what ways has the nation-state been a force for emancipation, and in what ways a vehicle of empire? What would it look like to live in a world that was fully feminist in its design, or that was built on reparations for past injustices, or that prioritizes the health of the planet above all? What are the conditions necessary for individuals and societies to undergo transformation, improve, and thrive?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Moe

Degree Requirements: WFY - First Year Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit. No letter grades given (fall section only).

WRIT 201
WRIT 201 - Intensive Writing Workshop

This course will help students become more confident and proficient in the writing that they do at Wellesley and beyond. Students will design an individualized syllabus around a topic of interest to them and focused on the areas of writing in which they most want to improve. Building on what they learned in their 100-level WRIT course, students will become more adept at working with sources, developing their thinking, and communicating their ideas clearly and purposefully. There will be two class meetings per week. In one, all students will meet as a group with the professor, engaging in writing workshops and discussing some short common readings. In the second meeting, students will meet individually with a TA to discuss readings on their own topic and to work on their writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the First-Year Writing requirement.

Instructor: Bryant (Writing Program)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit

WRIT 231D
WRIT 231D - Writing the Wave

This course will examine the recent, dramatic rise in the numbers of women writing and publishing the essay. This new wave of literary production, driven in part by the spirit of the #metoo movement, has inspired Cheryl Strayed to call it the essay’s “golden age.” Through studying the works of contemporary prose writers, we will explore the causes and effects of this phenomenon. We will also investigate how women are using and re-shaping the essay to foreground female experience and to confront difficult topics such as rape, harassment, abuse, and the silencing that so often surrounds those experiences. This rise in women’s voices is changing our literary and social landscape, and it is even shifting the form of the essay itself. Students will study this movement and contribute to it through their own writing.

Wellesley Online courses are designed to be highly interactive and encourage group discussion; they require participation through live online class meetings throughout the semester, as well as work in a collaborative environment.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the First-Year Writing requirement. Students who have taken WRIT 391 must receive permission of the instructor to enroll in this course.

Instructor: Bryant (Writing Program)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WRIT 250
WRIT 250 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to qualified students who have fulfilled the First-Year Writing requirement. Permission of the instructor and the director of the Writing Program required.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

WRIT 250H
WRIT 250H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: Open to qualified students who have fulfilled the First-Year Writing requirement. Permission of the instructor and the director of the Writing Program required.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

WRIT 277
ANTH 277/ WRIT 277 - True Stories

Do you like to "people watch"? Do you wish you could translate your real-world experiences into narratives that are readable and relatable, and also intellectually rigorous? If so, you probably have an ethnographic writer hiding somewhere inside you, and this class will give them the opportunity to emerge. Ethnography, a “written document of culture,” has long been a key component of a cultural anthropologist’s tool-kit, and scholars in other fields have recently begun to take up this practice. We will read classic and contemporary ethnographies to better understand the theoretical and practical significance of these texts. Students will also have the unique opportunity to be the authors and subjects of original ethnographic accounts, and at various stages in the semester they will act as anthropologists and as informants. Although this course will emphasize an anthropological method, it is appropriate for students from various disciplines who are looking to expand their research skills and develop new ways to engage in scholarly writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: ANTH 277

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the First-Year Writing requirement. Not open to First-Year students.

Instructor: Armstrong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

WRIT 293
WRIT 293 - Adv. Writing: West of Ireland

Why has the west of Ireland produced so many poets, lyricists, musicians, dramatists and fiction writers? This intensive, interdisciplinary writing course will allow students to engage that question as they are introduced to the terrain, villages, counties, cultural history, arts and people of the west of Ireland. In this two-week course in Ireland, students will explore and write about the cities of Letterfrack, Louisburg, Galway and Cork. Site visits will include Kylemore Abbey, the islands of Inishbofin and Achill, Bowen’s Court, Big House country, the Renvyle Peninsula. The course will comprise daily lectures by faculty, small group discussions, and daily writing, as well as visits by Irish poets and academics who contribute to the rich traditions of the Irish West.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the First-Year Writing requirement.

Instructor: Bryant (Writing Program)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Summer

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WRIT 325H
WRIT 325H - Advanced Writing Seminar

This course will support senior McNair Scholars in developing their writing and communication skills and in preparing to apply to graduate school. Students will become more confident, effective writers as they produce drafts of personal statements, fellowship applications, and other scholarly materials. This course will offer students the opportunity to: engage in professional development; practice communicating their scientific knowledge and research results to different audiences; and gain the benefits of being part of a community of scholars. Open only to seniors participating in the McNair Scholars Program.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required. Fulfillment of the First-Year Writing requirement. Open only to Seniors enrolled in the McNair Scholars Program.

Instructor: Johnson (Writing Program), Dolce (Biological Sciences)

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

WRIT 391
WRIT 391 - CSPW: Women Writing the 21st C

Margaret Atwood professes that, “A word after a word after a word is power.” Propelled by the #MeToo movement, LeanIn, and the women’s march, women are baring their truths, beliefs, and experiences in an explosion of public words. In this seminar students will become immersed in the dynamic contemporary landscape of women’s writing, spanning memoir, poetry, journalism, and political commentary. Within an intimate workshop setting, students will develop their own voices through assignments that will include book reviews, op-eds, social media analyses, and interviews. By taking turns as writers and editors, students will become skilled in evaluating and fostering their own writing as well as the writing of others. This course takes as its premise the intensive Calderwood format of having students regularly produce, critique, and revise their and their peers' writing by taking turns alternating being writers and editors throughout the semester.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: This course is open only to juniors and seniors; all students must have taken at least one 200-level course in the study of literature.

Instructor: Bryant (Writing Program)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: