WGST 100Y
WGST 100Y - FYS: The Body

This course explores the ways in which the body, as a reflection and construction of the self, is tied to social, cultural and political relations.  Through this examination of the role that our bodies play in daily life we will delve into the study of gender, race,  sexuality and power. Topics vary yearly but include: (1) after Roe and the medicalization of bodies (contraception, abortion, new reproductive technologies), (2) sex education and  the Internet as sites of bodily learning (3) body work (nail salons, surrogacy) (4) the use of the body as a vehicle for performance, self-expression and identity (drag queens, fashion). Throughout the course we will discuss how ideas about bodies are transported across national borders and social, sexual and class hierarchies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Hertz

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course. Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WGST 102Y
EDUC 103Y/ WGST 102Y - FYS: Lessons of Childhood

From Disney films to Nickelodeon cartoons to Newberry award-winning texts, popular children's media offers us the opportunity to analyze how complex issues of identity are represented in cultural productions aimed at a young audience. This course takes as a site of analysis media aimed at children to investigate the lessons imparted and ideologies circulate in popular films and books. How is class drawn in Lady and the Tramp? What are politics of language at play in Moana? What are the sounds of masculinity in Beauty and the Beast? How does Mulan construct gender, race, and militarism? Using an intersectional frame of analysis, we will trace popular tropes, identify images of resistance, and map out the more popular messages children receive about difference in our world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 10 3Y

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Mata

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course. Registration in this section is restricted to students selected for the Wellesley Plus Program. Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

WGST 104Y
SOC 104Y/ WGST 104Y - FYS: The Body

This course explores the ways in which the body, as a reflection and construction of the self, is tied to social, cultural and political relations. Through this examination of the role that our bodies play in daily life we will delve into the study of gender, race, sexuality and power. We focus on several major areas: (1) after Roe and the medicalization of bodies (contraception, abortion, new reproductive technologies), (2) sex education and the Internet as sites of bodily learning (3) body work (nail salons, surrogacy) (4) the use of the body as a vehicle for performance, self-expression and identity (drag queens, fashion). Throughout the course we will discuss how ideas about bodies are transported across national borders and social, sexual and class hierarchies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: SOC 10 4Y

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Hertz

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

WGST 108
WGST 108 - Social Construction of Inequalities

This course discusses the social construction -through social interactions and within social institutions- of gender, race, social class and sexuality, with an emphasis on the ways in which gender intersects with race, class, and sexuality. The processes and mechanisms that construct and institutionalize inequalities will be considered in a variety of contexts, including political, economic, educational, and cultural.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 120
WGST 120 - Intro to Women's & Gender Studies

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of women's and gender studies with an emphasis on an understanding of the "common differences" that both unite and divide women. Beginning with an examination of how womanhood has been represented in myths, ads, and popular culture, the course explores how gender inequalities have been both explained and critiqued. The cultural meaning given to gender as it intersects with race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality will be studied. This course also exposes some of the critiques made by women's studies' scholars of the traditional academic disciplines and the new intellectual terrain currently being mapped.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: J. Gutiérrez, Savit

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

WGST 121
WGST 121 - Reading Elvis Presley

Some have argued that Elvis Presley was the greatest cultural force in twentieth-century America. This course will consider the early career of Elvis Presley as a unique window for the study of race, class, gender, and heteronormative sexuality in postwar popular American culture. Specifically, we will look at the blending of African American and other forms of musical style in Presley's music, the representation of masculinity and sexuality across a sampling of his films and television performances, and key cultural film texts from the 1950s, and we will end by evaluating Presley's lasting impact as a unique icon in American cultural history.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Creef

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 205
WGST 205 - Love and Intimacy

This course explores love and intimacy in transnational context. In this course, we will examine the systems of meaning and practices that have evolved around notions of love and intimacy and investigate their broader political significance. We will further explore how love and intimacy are linked to economics, consumption practices, structural inequalities, disruptive technologies, and shifting ideas about subjectivity. If we accept that love, intimacy, and sexuality are socially constructed, how much agency do we exercise in whom we love and desire? How and in what ways do our experiences and expectations of love and intimacy shift as a result of economic arrangements, mobility, and technology? Finally, what, if any, ethical frameworks should mediate our intimate connections, desires, and labor with others?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Musto

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 210
WGST 210 - Health Activism

Health is a powerful manifestation of the economic, political and cultural substructures of society. This course uses a public health approach, a focus on health at the population level and attention in the distribution of disease, to explore the strategies related to and the power of health activism. Focusing on examples throughout U.S. history and in the present day, we will apply an intersectional lens to understand how inequalities (e.g. race, class, gender and sexual identity) are embodied via health and impact individuals and communities. Using a case study approach we will examine social movements (eg, AIDS activism, reproductive justice, workers’ rights), as well as structural efforts (eg, healthcare reform and legal challenges) to discuss collective struggles and successful strategies for transformation. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. Not open to students who have taken WGST 310.

Instructor: O'Donnell

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: This course is also offered at the 300-level as WGST 310.

WGST 211
SOC 205/ WGST 211 - Mod Families & Social Inequalities

Feminist scholarship demonstrates that American family life needs to be viewed through two lenses: one that highlights the embeddedness of family in class, race, heteronormativity, gender inequalities and another that draws our attention to historical developments – such as the aftermath of World War 2, technologies and government social policies. In 2015 same-sex marriage became U.S. federal law; but at the same time fewer people are marrying and parenthood is delayed. Moreover, new reproductive technologies coupled with the Internet and the wish for intimacy is creating unprecedented families. Topics covered vary yearly but include: inequalities around employment, the home front and childcare; intensive motherhood, social class and cultural capital; welfare to work programs; immigrant families and the American Dream. Finally, we will explore new developments from adoption to gamete donors by same-sex or single-parent families and how science and technologies are facilitating the creation of new kinds of kin. A special feature of this class is looking at the relationship of families and social policy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: SOC 20 5

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Hertz

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

WGST 214
WGST 214 - Women and Health

This multi-disciplinary course introduces a broad range of concepts and issues related to the highly diverse group we call “women” and their health with a primary focus on the United States. The class will cover three areas of inquiry. First, the course explores basic definitions, concepts, data, and narratives regarding women's health needs, status, and experiences, the social determinants of health, and women's health movements. Second, the course interrogates sexual and reproductive health as an intersection between health, gender, and broader social structures. Third, the course investigates current events as theatres for enduring patterns around women and health, such as healthcare reform, innovations in remote heathcare delivery, and the COVID-19 pandemic.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 24

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: O'Donnell

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

WGST 215
WGST 215 - Gender Equality & Sexualities

Feminist scholars have long recognized Denmark and Sweden as among the most gender equal, sexually progressive countries in the world. Bolstered by a strong welfare state and egalitarian values, Sweden and Denmark have been held up as prototypes for their cultivation of gender inclusive policies. The course will cover a range of topics, including sexual and reproductive markets, sex education, and changing configurations of family. We will also examine how both countries’ welfare states are influenced by markets and consider the extent to which national legislation in a moment of heightened mobility and globalization is equipped to transform societal norms, promote gender equality, and foster sexual freedom and reproductive justice.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Hertz, Musto

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 216
WGST 216 - Woman and Popular Culture

This course proposes an analysis of popular cultural productions and the ways in which they represent Chicanxs and Latinxs. Cultural productions go beyond just entertaining an audience; they help to inform how we see ourselves and the world around us. These productions often support traditional stereotypes about marginalized groups. The course will encourage students to question the ways in which Chicanx/Latinxs are reduced to stereotypes that reinforce hierarchies of race and gender. By critically reading popular productions as analyzable cultural texts, we will ask: How do cultural productions perpetuate the "otherness" of Chicanx/Latinxs? What role does sexuality play in the representation of the Chicanx/Latinx subject? In what ways do cultural productions by Chicanx/Latinxs resist/challenge negative images?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Mata

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 217
EDUC 217/ WGST 217 - Growing Up Gendered

This course focuses on childhood and the teen years in the United States. How is gender socially constructed in childhood and adolescence? What are the experiences of children and teens in families, schools, and peer groups that contribute to that process? What is the relationship between pop culture and the gendered lives of children and teens? How does gendering vary by race/ethnicity and social class? We will explore the core issues in the field, including the importance of including the voices of children and teens, the ways in which gender is constructed in social interactions, and the intersections of gender, sexuality and peer status.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 217

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 218
WGST 218 - Stage Left

This course serves as an introduction to Chicanx/Latinx theatre and performance and the role that class, race, gender, and sexuality play in constructing identity on the stage. We will examine how members of the Chicanx/Latinx community-individuals often marginalized from mainstream theatre productions-employ the public stage as a space for self-expression and resistance. Through an analysis of plays and theatre/performance scholarship, we will identify common themes and important differences in the various productions. We will further consider how community, citizenship, and notions of belonging manifest themselves on the public arena of the stage. We will begin by studying the role of theatre in the social justice movements of the 1960s and trace the changes that Chicanx/Latinx theatre and performance have undergone in subsequent years.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Mata

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 219
WGST 219 - Gender in the Workplace

This course explores the experiences of workers in the changing U.S. workplace. The course will address key issues related to gender, race and class in the workplace, including the social organization of work-the nature of work, division of labor, social inequality as well as gendered organizations, and processes of gender discrimination, including sexual harassment.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: One course in WGST, SOC or ECON.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 220
WGST 220 - Am Health Care Hist: Gender, Race, Class

Traditional American medical history has emphasized the march of science and the ideas of the "great doctors" in the progressive improvement in American medical care. In this course, we will look beyond just medical care to the social and economic factors that have shaped the development of the priorities, institutions, and personnel in the health care system in the United States. We will ask how gender, race, class, and sexuality have affected the kind of care developed, its differential delivery, and the problems and issues addressed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: WGST 108 or WGST 120 or WGST 222, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 221
PEAC 201/ WGST 221 - Gender, Race & Carceral State

What is the carceral state? What do girls, women, and transgender individuals’ experiences of policing and punishment in 21st century America reveal about its shifting dimensions? Despite public concerns about mass incarceration in the United States and calls for criminal justice reform, mainstream commentators rarely account for the gendered, racialized, and class dimensions of punishment, nor address the growing ranks of girls, women, poor and gender nonconforming individuals that experience carceral control and oversight. Interdisciplinary in scope, this course critically examines how race, gender, sexuality and class intersect and shape people’s experience with systems of punishment and control. It further explores the economic, social, and political factors that have influenced the development of the contemporary American carceral state and scholarly, activist, and artistic responses to it.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 20 1

Prerequisites: One WGST course or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Musto

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 222
WGST 222 - Gender & Sexuality Cont Amer

Drawing upon feminist, queer, and social science theories of gender and sexuality, this course will examine transformations in the lives of cisgender and transgender people in a contemporary U.S. context. Particular emphasis will be placed on technology, inequality, and activist and scholarly agitations for social justice. Questions we will explore include: To what extent are categories of gender, sexuality, race and class socially constructed? How have our understandings of these categories shifted across time and space? How do networked and mobile technologies shape identities and alter individuals' understanding and performance of gender, sexuality, race and class? Finally, how are carceral politics, border policies, precarious labor arrangements and surveillance practices, among other topics, shaped by race, gender, sexuality, class and citizenship and to what extent are these intersecting positionalities leveraged in building movements for justice?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Musto

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 223
CAMS 240/ WGST 223 - Gendering the Bronze Screen

The history of Chicanxs and Latinxs on the big screen is a long and complicated one. To understand the changes that have occurred in the representation of Chicanxs/Latinxs, this course proposes an analysis of films that traces various stereotypes to examine how those images have been perpetuated, altered, and ultimately resisted. From the Anglicizing of names to the erasure of racial backgrounds, the ways in which Chicanxs and Latinxs are represented has been contingent on ideologies of race, gender, class, and sexuality. We will be examining how films have typecast Chicanas/Latinas as criminals or as "exotic" based on their status as women of color, and how Chicano/Latino filmmakers continue the practice of casting Chicanas/Latinas solely as supporting characters to male protagonists.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 240

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Mata

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

WGST 224
WGST 224 - Feminist Methods

What is feminist research? What is feminist methods? This course addresses these questions by exploring the methods of interviewing, ethnography, surveys, focus groups, and participatory action research from a feminist perspective. The class grounds methods in anthropology, sociology, and explores examples from across the social sciences. The readings for the class explore topics of engaged research and feminist politics of knowledge production. The course focuses on situating multiple methods within feminist epistemologies, and critically examining self- reflectivity among researchers and the ways they influence research.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: J. Gutierrez

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

WGST 225
WGST 225 - Politics and Sexuality

What does consent have to do with politics and sexuality? From the “consent of the governed” to “affirmative consent,” notions of political and sexual agency and ethics develop in relation to consent. For example, much of the thinking about democracy and the exercise of bodily autonomy refers to consent. So, too, the contemporary feminist critique of rape culture advocates for the practice of affirmative, even enthusiastic, consent as an index of agency. We will ask: who can consent and, as importantly, who can withhold consent? Are all bodies, genders, and sexualities equally able to consent? We will read ancient and contemporary texts in order to gauge the historical scope of consent. We will spend some time with feminist theory from the 1980s that proposes new configurations of power, bodies, and pleasure, and explore how this work offers a counter discourse to neoliberal accounts of individual pleasure and risk. Sample texts: Anne Carson, Antigonick; C. Riley Snorton, Black on Both Sides; Judith Butler, Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly; Monique Wittig, The Lesbian Body; Sandra Lee Bartly, Femininity and Domination; Sarah Schulman, Conflict is Not Abuse.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 24

Prerequisites: One WGST course or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 226
WGST 226 - The Body

This course will offer a critical representation of bodies across science, society, and public health. We explore a variety of approaches to studying the body that challenge the Cartesian dualism, which splits the mind from the body. We also draw from feminist theories that examine the body in relation to race, gender, sexuality, and power. The course content shows how social values can have material and physiological effects on bodies and in turn how aesthetic and medical representations of the body reflect social values.  While the class focuses primarily on examples in the U.S., we will include some cross-cultural examples that reveal how bodies change through social and historical forces. Students will gain a critical understanding for how conceptions of the body are important for understanding markets, beauty, reproduction, public health and biomedicine writ large. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 230
WGST 230 - Gender and Technologies

Using examples from everyday life, this course investigates how preferences for certain technologies are shaped by social arrangements that reflect power relations, including genetic testing, social media, and the construction of a wall on the US/Mexico border.By considering the origins, materiality, and practices of use for a diverse range of technologies, from the telephone to the underwire bra, this course will interrogate the socio-political and ethical fallout of consumer and medical technologies. Within the context of this history of technology as a means of manipulating nature and maintaining control over groups of people, we will also consider how users, tinkerers, and hackers challenge and negotiate the meanings and usage of technology in ways that contradict the intended use.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 240
PEAC 240/ WGST 240 - U.S. Public Health

A quarter century ago the Institute of Medicine defined the work of public health as "what we as a society do collectively to assure the conditions in which people can be healthy." Historically rooted in a commitment to social justice, U.S. public health is now renewing this commitment through 1) an epidemiological shift to examine the social, economic, and political inequities that create disparate health and disease patterns by gender, class, race, sexual identity, citizenship, etc., and 2) a corresponding health equity movement in public health practice. This broad-ranging course examines the debates shaping the above as well as the moral and legal groundings of public health, basic epidemiology, and the roles of public and private actors. Highlighted health topics vary year to year.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 240

Prerequisites: Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Harrison

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

WGST 249
CAMS 241/ WGST 249 - Asian/American Women in Film

This course will serve as an introduction to representations of Asian/American women in film beginning with silent classics and ending with contemporary social media. In the first half of the course, we examine the legacy of Orientalism, the politics of interracial romance, the phenomenon of "yellow face", and the different constructions of Asian American femininity, masculinity, and sexuality. In the second half of the course, we look at "Asian American cinema" where our focus will be on contemporary works, drawing upon critical materials from film theory, feminist studies, Asian American studies, history, and cultural studies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 241

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Creef

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

WGST 250
WGST 250 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

WGST 250H
WGST 250H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

WGST 255
WGST 255 - Transnational Perspectives

In this course, we will explore the ways individuals and nations reconfigure their conceptions of sex, gender, and race due to globalization. We will explore transnational phenomena such as sex trafficking, sex tourism, and marriage migration. We will address questions such as: In an era of increasingly fast-paced and multifaceted globalization, how do we formulate sexual, gender, and racial identities across national and cultural boundaries? How do migrants renegotiate their gender, sexual, and racial identities in their new countries of residence? What motivates sex tourists to travel to other countries to form intimate relations? How do these sex tourists influence the sexual, gender, and racial identities of the local people they interact with?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 260
WGST 260 - Critical Public Health

This course takes a critical perspective on the field of public health by applying a feminist lens to examine current health crises such as pandemics, police brutality, racism, and gender violence. Drawing on Black feminism and critical race studies we examine how logics of race/racism, gender binaries, and hierarchies of power and knowledge shape the ways in which public health concerns are defined and intervened upon. We explore emergent research topics that have only recently been framed as legitimate public health issues, such as gun control and policing.  In order to understand how far the field has come in expanding its scope of study, and why it has taken this long, the course historically situates the field of public health within an intersectional framework. We end by examining past and present inspirations of how public health contributes to people’s well-being. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

WGST 264
WGST 264 - Gender, Race and Media

This course examines how media constructs expressions of masculinity, femininity, and sexuality through normative and transgressive representations of gender and race within media. Through readings, screenings, and class discussions, we will examine how gender, sexuality, and race are constructed within a cultural domain of power that not only constitutes but also is constituted by the production, consumption, and interpretation of media.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Savit

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

WGST 265
WGST 265 - LGBTQ+ Lives Onscreen

This course examines how LGBTQ+ individuals have been depicted in media. Grounded in queer theory and queer of color critique, the class charts the evolution of such depictions, mapping the progress media industries have made in representing LGBTQ+ people onscreen, while also thinking critically about the work still left to do. It asks the following questions: who has helmed these portrayals, both behind and in front of the camera? How have these different representational modes informed (ostensibly) straight audiences’ understandings of queer identities? How do these cinematic depictions of queerness impact members of the LGBTQ+ community?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Savit

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

WGST 274
AMST 274/ WGST 274 - Gender & Race in Westerns

Westerns, a complex category that includes not only films but also novels, photographs, paintings, and many forms of popular culture, have articulated crucial mythologies of American culture from the nineteenth century to the present. From Theodore Roosevelt to the Lone Ranger, myths of the Trans-Mississippi West have asserted iconic definitions of American masculinity and rugged individualism. Yet as a flexible, ever-changing genre, Westerns have challenged, revised, and subverted American concepts of gender and sexuality. Westerns have also struggled to explain a dynamic and conflictive "borderlands" among Native Americans, Anglos, Latinos, Blacks, and Asians. This team-taught, interdisciplinary course will investigate Westerns in multiple forms, studying their representations of the diverse spaces and places of the American West and its rich, complicated, and debated history.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 274

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Creef, P. Fisher (American Studies)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 296
WGST 296 - Women & Economic Inequality

In the U.S. more women than men live in poverty. This class will highlight how income inequality and the disproportion of wealth are gendered and racialized, impacting women of color at higher rates. Throughout the course we will examine how such economic processes as globalization and such ideologies as neoliberalism influences employment, labor, wages, health, social life, families, and other societal structures. Applying feminist theories, we will also contextualize the life experiences of women of color from their perspectives and question dominant ideals that perpetuate the concept of meritocracy. We will also engage and learn about the different ways women of color resist economic inequality through life skills and strategies, activism, and social movements.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: J. Gutierrez

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

WGST 302
WGST 302 - Global Health / Env. Crisis

Social understandings of the relationship between human health and the environment are visible and malleable in moments of crisis, from industrial disasters, weather-related catastrophes, and political conflict, as everyday events like childbirth and routine sickness. But these understandings vary dramatically across time and community. This course addresses the complex dynamics at work in the representations of and responses to health and the environment that emerge during moments of crisis. By studying the way these constructions are shaped by social, political, technological, and moral contexts, we will analyze the role of nature, knowledge, ethics and power in such contemporary problems as human migration, hunger, debility, and disease. The class will together consider the meaning of crisis and how it is shaped by social systems such as gender, sexuality, ability, class, and race.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to Sophomores, Juniors or Seniors who have taken a 200 level WGST course or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Harrison

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

WGST 305
WGST 305 - Sem: Rep of Women, Natives & "Others"

A feminist cultural studies approach to the representation of race, class, gender and sexuality in film, photography, and art featuring Native Americans. This course examines the longstanding legacy of the Hollywood Western and its depiction of "reel injuns" before exploring the rich history of Native American self-representation and visual sovereignty in film and culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Recommended for Juniors and Seniors with background in WGST, AMST, or CAMS.

Instructor: Creef

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 306
SOC 306/ WGST 306 - Sem: Women Leaders at Work

More women leaders are in work settings and public office than any prior point in history. However, the fraction of women who are CEOs, board members of major corporations, heads of state and elected representatives in global assemblies remains shockingly small by comparison to the sheer numbers of women workers, consumers, and family decision makers. This course will examine the way that gender, race, and class shape women's access to positions of leadership and power at work. Questions to be considered include: (1) Why are there so few women leaders in work settings? (2) What can we learn about leadership from women who have achieved it? Four modules for the course are (1) Strategies developed by women who lead; (2) Efforts to achieve parity through policies, e.g., glass ceilings, affirmative action; (3) Tensions between work, family and carework; and (4) Profiles of Productive Rule Breakers. Students will research women leaders in all sectors and countries.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: SOC 30 6

Prerequisites: Open to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors. Priority will be given to SOC and WGST majors and minors.

Instructor: Hertz

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 307
WGST 307 - Sem: Techno-Orientalism

This course examines Techno-Orientalism as a global science fiction genre in literature, film, and social media to understand the broad historical and social formations of Otherness, Aliens, Citizenship, and Immigration. We also study racial assumptions in popular culture, discourses of the human and human rights, science and technology industries, and anti-Asian violence during the global pandemic. Finally, we also interrogate the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, class, and geopolitical divisions and interactions in Asian/American Studies and Postcolonial Studies from the past to the present.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Recommended for juniors or seniors with background in WGST, Asian American Studies, CAMS, Media Arts, East Asian Studies.

Instructor: Creef

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

WGST 311
SOC 311/ WGST 311 - Sem: Family and Gender Studies

This course examines the politics facing contemporary U.S. families and potential policy directions at the State and Federal Levels. Discussion of the transformation of American families including changing economic and social expectations for parents, inequality between spouses, choices women make about children and employment, daycare and familial care giving, welfare and underemployment, and new American dreams will be explored. Changing policies regarding welfare and teen pregnancy will also be examined as part of government incentives to promote self-sufficient families. Expanding family (i.e. single mothers by choice, lesbian/gay/trans families) through the use of new reproductive technologies is emphasized as examples of legislative reform and the confusion surrounding genetic and social kinship is explored. Comparisons to other contemporary societies will serve as foils for particular analyses. Students will learn several types of research methodologies through course assignments. Student groups will also produce an original social policy case.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: SOC 311

Prerequisites: One 100 level and one 200 level course in either WGST or Sociology. Open to Juniors and Seniors; to Sophomores by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hertz

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 313
WGST 313 - Fieldwork in Women's Studies

This is a supervised, independent fieldwork project resulting in a research paper, documentary, policy initiative, creative arts presentation, or other research product. This project, developed in conjunction with a WGST faculty member, will have a significant experiential component focusing on women's lives and/or gender. Students may (1) work in an organization, (2) work with activists or policy makers on social change issues or social policy issues, or (3) design their own fieldwork experience.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to majors or minors only. Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

WGST 314
WGST 314 - Sem: Transnational Feminisms

This seminar is structured as a critical engagement of transnational feminism(s) in a global context. In this course, we will explore how neoliberal globalization, human rights discourses and an intersecting array of complexes — including those of a humanitarian, non-profit, and prison industrial variety - dually shape and constrain agitations for justice across national, political, and technological borders and boundaries. We will further track how and in what ways ideas about different feminism(s), women's, LGBTQ, transgender and human rights, and paradigms of justice travel across borders, shape systems of response, and promote and/or ameliorate the vulnerability and life opportunities of particular bodies located within particular geopolitical contexts.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One course in WGST.

Instructor: J. Gutierrez

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

WGST 320
WGST 320 - Sem: Race, Gender, and Science

What are ethnographic methods? And what is feminist ethnography? This course addresses these questions by exploring the method of ethnography from a feminist perspective. The class grounds ethnographic methods in anthropology and explores examples from across the social sciences. The readings for the class explore topics of engaged research and feminist politics of knowledge production. The course focuses on situating ethnographic methods within feminist epistemologies, and critically examining ethnographic examples by attending to race, gender, and power. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One WGST Course or one 100 level STEM course. Open to Juniors and Seniors; to Sophomores by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

WGST 322
SOC 322/ WGST 322 - Sem: Contemporary Reproduction

This course focuses on the politics of human reproduction which is inextricably linked with nation states, as well as cultural norms and expectations. Reproductive issues and debates serve as proxies for more fundamental questions about the intersecting inequalities of citizenship, gender, race, class, disability and sexuality. What does reproductive justice look like? We will discuss how the marketplace, medical technologies and the law are critical to creating social hierarchies that are produced, resisted and transformed. We ask: Why is access critical to control for the use of fertility technologies (both pre-and during pregnancy), gamete purchase, egg freezing? How is each accomplished and by whom? How are new technologies in reproduction coupled with the global marketplace creating a social hierarchy between people (e.g. gamete donors, gestational carriers). Finally, what is the relationship between the commercialization of reproduction and the creation of new intimacies and forms of kinship? The course emphasizes both empirical research situated in the U.S. and research involving transnational flows.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: SOC 322

Prerequisites: Open only to Juniors and Seniors majoring or minoring in WGST or SOC. To other students by permission of the instructor only.

Instructor: Hertz

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

WGST 326
WGST 326 - Sem: Crossing the Border(s)

This course examines literatures that challenge the construction of borders, be they physical, ideological, or metaphoric. The theorizing of the border, as more than just a material construct used to demarcate national boundaries, has had a profound impact on the ways in which Chicana/Latinas have written about the issue of identity and subject formation. We will examine how the roles of women are constructed to benefit racial and gender hierarchies through the policing of borders and behaviors. In refusing to conform to gender roles or hegemonic ideas about race or sexuality, the Chicana and Latina writers being discussed in the course illustrate the necessity of crossing the constructed boundaries of identity being imposed by the community and the greater national culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Any WGST 100-level course and WGST 200-level course or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Mata

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

WGST 328
ES 328/ WGST 328 - Sem: Naturecultures

The stories we tell about the world make certain futures possible, while foreclosing other imaginable ones. This course reveals how Western historical, theoretical, and scientific ways of knowing understood both women and nature as inferior and thus needing to be controlled. Pushing back against the ideas of any inherent binary separations between men/women and nature/culture, we will examine ecofeminism as a theoretical location within both feminist and environmental philosophies and as a social movement. We will survey representations of culture and environment in several areas such as climate change, food and water justice, Indigenous sovereignty, and toxic chemicals.


Learning from the intertwined history of environment and gender, that have led to both personal and global inequity and disaster, we will also engage solutions that imagine different futures. Recognizing that solutions to environmental problems require a feminist attunement, we can start to understand the implications that our ethical commitments have to the future of life on the planet.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: ES 328

Prerequisites: Any WGST 200-level course or ES-200-level course. Juniors and Seniors only. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor only.   

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 341
WGST 341 - Sem: Anti-Carceral Feminism

Feminist scholars, activists, and community organizers have been at the forefront of the US and transnational abolitionist movement to address structural violence, including but not limited to violence that occurs in jails, prisons, and immigration detention facilities. Anti-carceral feminists share a broad commitment to divesting in carceral systems and resisting racist ideologies and carceral feminist projects fueling the “global prison industrial complex.” Anti-carceral feminist efforts have culminated in a rich yet understudied body of work animated by intersectional and transnational insights. Interdisciplinary in scope, this seminar explores anti-carceral feminist research and activism in the United States and transnationally. In addition to engaging with anti-carceral feminist research, this seminar will explore abolitionist feminist methods and organizing strategies to facilitate safety, accountability, and transformative justice. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: WGST 120 and WGST 221, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Musto

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

WGST 342
WGST 342 - Feminist Movements

Grounded in feminist and critical race theory, this course provides students with the theoretical and historical backgrounds so that they can critically consider contemporary feminist movements and their lineage to early feminist activism and theory. The class considers how social media platforms and technological infrastructure enables contemporary digital activism. Contemporary movements the course will explore include Black Lives Matter, #MeToo, Women's March, Reproductive Justice.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: WGST 120 and one 200 level course. Open to Juniors and Seniors only.

Instructor: Savit

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

WGST 350
WGST 350 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

WGST 350H
WGST 350H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

WGST 360
WGST 360 - Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

WGST 370
WGST 370 - Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: WGST 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.