POL 109Y
POL 109Y - FYS: Democracy in America

The premise of this course is that Alexis de Tocqueville's nineteenth-century masterpiece, Democracy in America, remains a useful starting point for understanding democracy, America, and politics across nations in the twenty-first century. Students in the course will read excerpts from Democracy in America alongside contemporary works in social science that take up some of the themes and concepts Tocqueville developed in his book. These themes and concepts will provide the fuel for class discussions and debates, and for student research that probes the contemporary relevance of the questions about democracy and America that Tocqueville raised so provocatively two centuries ago.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 0

Prerequisites: None. Open to first-year students only.

Instructor: Burke

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

POL 112Y
POL 112Y - Wars of Ideas

This first-year seminar examines "wars of ideas" in international politics. How do changes in ideas shape international conflict? To what extent do ideas and identities motivate foreign policies? Has international relations moved beyond states and their security interests, and is now driven by a "clash of civilizations"? Historically, we will explore the role of religion in shaping the modern state system in the 17th century, nationalism and imperialism in the 19th century, and fascism, liberalism, and communism in the 20th century. Contemporary case studies will look at ethnic conflict, the "resurgence" of religion in international politics, and the role of American national identity in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: None. Open to first-year students only.

Instructor: Goddard

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course

POL 115
POL 115 - Politics and Ethics

Can politics be a moral enterprise or is it a realm where violence, deception and cruelty are and must be routine? Students will explore works of political, social, critical race and feminist theory as well as case studies, plays, novels and film to critically engage with questions such as: how do we judge whether a political act is moral or immoral? Does the context of war negate the moral precepts that hold in peacetime? Do national borders mark the place where our moral commitments to others end? Who's the “we” that determines the content of moral judgments and the reach of our ethical obligations? And last but not least: to what extent do particular experiences, identities (e.g. gender, race, class, etc) or habits of mind influence our ability to imaginatively inhabit perspectives other than our own--an ability Hannah Arendt connects to the very capacity to be moral?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None. Open to first-year and sophomore students only.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

POL 121
POL 121 - Amer War on Terror

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 were a transformative moment in world politics. The general optimism and sense of security that prevailed following the end of the Cold War gave way to fear and anxiety about America's place in the world. This course explores how September 11th changed the United States, and the legacy the attacks and their aftermath have had on current American foreign policy. What is Al Qaeda and why did it target the United States? How did the United States fight the “War on Terror”? Why did the United States invade Afghanistan and Iraq? How do the policies of President Obama differ from those of President Bush? This course is for first- and second-year students and assumes no background in political science. Together we will develop a shared base of knowledge to debate the critical questions that continue to shape world politics.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None. Open to first-year and sophomore students only. May not be repeated for credit by students who earned credit for POL3 121.

Instructor: MacDonald

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL 123
POL 123 - Logic & Rhetoric Pol Analysis

Designed to sharpen judgment about current political claims, the course uses classical logic and rhetoric to examine processes of thinking and methods of persuasion. We learn the use of independent observation, logical reasoning, forms of deductive inference, and kinds of experimentation. We examine theories related to discovery and the nature of truth. We subject political oratory and reporting to critical scrutiny. Most attention is paid to techniques of persuasion involving logical fallacies such as the 'genetic fallacy,' appeals to emotions such as indignation, and biases such as chauvinism. Reading focuses on studies and stories of detection and discovery.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Candland

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

POL 125Y
POL 125Y - FYS:War&Peace in Lit,Politics

This course explores the ideas and practice of engaging in war, conflict resolution, and peacemaking by examining various literary sources. Students will read fiction, poetry, memoirs, and other forms of literature broadly defined to examine depictions and expressions of human violence, power dynamics, and yearnings for peace. The class will discuss how literature glorifies and condemns war; whether literature can contribute to developing empathy and desire for healing and reconstruction of communities; pacifist literature aimed at preventing and protesting war; children’s literature as a way to teach and nurture peace; “eco-literature” to question the ways human beings nurture and violate nature. Readings will include literary portrayals of political conflicts in different time periods and cultural contexts.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Katharine Moon

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

POL 230
POL 230 - Washington: Leadership Policy

This course will examine the role of political leadership in the U.S. policymaking process, with a particular emphasis on foreign policy. We will examine different theories of political leadership, and apply them to understand how actors both inside and outside of government attempt to shape political outcomes. Along the way, we will explore what is leadership, who gets to exercise leadership, how bureaucratic structures can constrain or enable leadership, and whether leadership is synonymous with policy effectiveness. Through meetings with representatives from interest groups, think tanks, and legislative and executive institutions, students will observe and critically analyze how political actors conceive of power and influence in real world settings. Our primary focus will be on how foreign policy decisions get made, but students are welcome to explore other related areas of public policy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: POL 200, POL 221, or instructor consent. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out an application available on the political science department website homepage.

Instructor: MacDonald

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course has a required Wintersession component. The fall and winter component each earns 0.5 units of credit; however, both components must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either component. The fall portion of the course will meet on alternate Wednesdays starting. Application required.

POL 299
POL 299 - Intro Research Meth in PolSci

An introduction to the process of conducting research in political science. Students will develop an intuition for problem-driven research in the social sciences, gaining specific insight into the range of methodological tools employed by political scientists. In this course, students will design and analyze a research question, formulate and test hypotheses about politics, evaluate techniques to measuring political phenomena, and assess methods of empirical analysis and interpretation. The course has a particular focus on quantitative analysis and students will gain fluency in statistical software. The course provides a foundation for conducting empirical research and is strongly recommended for students interested in independent research, a senior honors thesis, and/or graduate school.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: One course in political science. Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken or are taking POL 199, MATH 101, MATH 101Z, ECON 103/SOC 190, QR 180, or PSYC 205.

Instructor: Maneesh Arora

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL1 200
POL1 200 - American Politics

The institutions, processes, and values that shape American politics. The origins and evolution of the U.S. Constitution and the institutions it created: Congress, the executive branch, the presidency, the federal court system, and federalism. Analysis of "intermediary" institutions including political parties, interest groups, elections, and the media. Study of enduring debates over values in American politics, with particular attention to conflicts over civil rights and civil liberties.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Arora, Burke, Sapir, Scherer

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

POL1 215
POL1 215 - Courts, Law & Politics

Fundamentals of the American legal system, including the sources of law, the nature of legal process, the role of courts and judges, and legal reasoning and advocacy. Examination of the interaction of law and politics, and the role and limits of law as an agent for social change.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: POL1 200

Instructor: Burke

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

POL1 247
POL1 247 - Constitutional Law

This course is a survey of landmark decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court throughout American history. The course covers both cases about the structure of our government and cases interpreting the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. Topics include executive powers, congressional authority under the Commerce Clause, nation-state relations, economic liberties, freedom of the press, the right to privacy, the rights of the criminally accused, and the civil rights of women and minorities.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: POL1 200

Instructor: Scherer

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

POL1 300
POL1 300 - Public Policymaking

This course examines how public policy on a wide range of issues, from reproductive rights to education, environment, and immigration, is made in the United States. The battle over these issues involves many institutions-the president, the executive branch, Congress, the courts, state and local governments-who compete, and sometimes cooperate, over public policy. Students will analyze current policy struggles to better understand the interactions among these institutions and the resulting shape of American public policy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: POL1 200

Instructor: Burke

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL1 303
POL1 303 - The Politics of Crime

This course will explore major topics on criminal policy and procedure through the lens of American politics. This year, the course will cover the following topics: the Supreme Court and civil liberties; race, gender, class, and crime; the death penalty; prison reform; and the war on drugs.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: POL1 200

Instructor: Scherer

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL1 317
POL1 317 - Health Politics and Policy

The American system of health care is distinctive. Financing is provided through voluntary employer contributions, tax subsidies, individual payments and an array of public programs, principally Medicare and Medicaid-but despite the variety of funding sources, Americans, unlike citizens of other affluent democracies, are not guaranteed health care coverage. How did the American approach to health care develop? How is it different from that of other affluent nations? What explains the differences? What are the strengths and weaknesses of the American health care system? Issues of cost containment, technological innovation, quality of care, and disparities in health outcomes are explored.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: POL1 200

Instructor: Burke

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

POL1 324
POL1 324 - Sem: Gender and Law

Analysis of how law in the United States is used to confer rights, create obligations, and define the identities of women. The course explores the historical and modern approaches used by the Supreme Court to address gender disparity in society, including labor law, reproductive rights, family law, sexual discrimination in the workplace, and gay rights. The course also analyzes the relationship between the feminist movement, social policymaking, and the Supreme Court. The last part of the class will examine whether the gender of legal actors (litigants, lawyers, and judges) makes a difference in their reasoning or decision-making.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: POL1 200 and by permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: Scherer

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

POL1 328
POL1 328 - Seminar. Immigration Politics

The United States is in the middle of an increasingly hostile and polarizing national debate over immigration policy and the outcomes of immigrant incorporation. This course situates the debate by exploring the history of immigration in the U.S., public policy that has been aimed at immigration flows or immigrants, and the resulting political consequences. This course will grapple with notions of citizenship and ‘illegality’ while examining the ways that demographic change has influenced opinions, behaviors, partisanship, and values of the broader public. We will critically analyze recent immigration policy proposals, paying close attention to the effects of these proposals on immigration flows, immigrant rights, and the broader political and societal ramifications of policy action and inaction. Finally, we will turn our attention to the dynamics of immigration policy-making and examine how race, gender, sexuality, and class both affect and are affected by immigration laws.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: POL1 200 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: Maneesh Arora

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL1 329
POL1 329 - Political Psychology

This course provides an overview of the growing literature on political psychology. We will focus on psychological theories that help us to understand how voters think and feel about politics. The primary goal of this course is to acquaint you with various ways in which psychological theory contributes to our understanding of politics and vice versa. For example, does prejudice influence citizens' voting decisions? Is opposition to gay marriage rooted in ideological concerns, or rather in emotions like disgust or fear? Why do many voters dismiss seemingly objective information and vote "against their interests"? Topics include cognition, emotion, prejudice, identity, personality, authority and obedience, and motivated reasoning all with applications to American politics in particular, but we will also consider the relevance of these topics to other countries as well.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: POL1 200

Instructor: Chudy

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL1 333
POL1 333 - CSPW: American Politics

This course will teach students to effectively communicate to the public political science research on American politics. This will require students to step back from the details of their coursework to examine how political science has shaped their understandings of political phenomena. How are the perspectives of political scientists different from those of practitioners and the public? How can these perspectives contribute to public debates on politics? Through a series of writing assignments--for example Op/eds, book reviews and interviews--students will learn how to translate expert knowledge and perspectives into everyday language, but perhaps even more importantly, how to draw on that knowledge to address the concerns of citizens about the political world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: POL1 200 or the equivalent and by permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: Burke

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL1 337
POL1 337 - Sem: Race in American Politics

This seminar examines race and ethnicity in American politics, with special attention to the modern civil rights era of the 1960s and beyond. We will consider the definition and political meaning of racial and ethnic identities, the role of racial identity and attitudes in structuring Americans' political opinions and behaviors, how redistricting shapes the representation of non-white groups, the political implications of intersections among race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality, and the role of race in recent national elections.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: POL1 200 and by permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: Chudy

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL1 365
POL1 365 - Latino Politics

This course examines the history and contemporary roles of Latinos in American politics, including the emergence of “Latino” as a pan-ethnic identity and demographic profiles of the group; the “Americanization” and “racialization” of Latinos; and the relationship between Latinos and non-Latinos as they relate to political institutions, representation, and voting coalitions. The class will also focus on the development of Latino public opinion and partisanship, how these manifest in Latinos’ political participation, and their importance in recent presidential and midterm elections (2008-2018). The course also examines U.S. immigration policy as context to understand current debates that shape the Latino community now and in the future.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: POL1200

Instructor: Viviana Rivera-Burgos

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL1 381
ES 381/ POL1 381 - U.S. Environmental Politics

This course examines the politics of environmental issues in the United States. The course has two primary goals: First, to introduce students to the institutions, stakeholders, and political processes important to debates over environmental policy at the federal level. Second, to develop and practice skills of analyzing and making decisions relevant to environmental politics and policy. Drawing on the literature of environmental politics and policy, this course will consider how environmental issues are framed in political discourse, various approaches to environmental advocacy and reform, and the contested role of science in environmental politics. The course will be organized around environmental case studies, including endangered species conservation, public lands management, air and water pollution, and toxics regulation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: POL 1381

Prerequisites: A 200-level ES course or POL1 200 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Turner

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL2 202
POL2 202 - Comparative Politics

Comparative Politics examines political institutions and processes across and within countries. The course enables students to distinguish between core concepts in the study of politics (e.g., government, regime, state, nation); appreciate the politics of collective identities (e.g., class, ethnicity, gender, religion, race); understand common political processes (e.g., state formation, revolution, democratization); understand major electoral systems (e.g., single member constituency, proportional representation) and systems of representation (e.g., parliamentary, presidential); gain familiarity with the political histories and domestic politics of several countries; and design a research project using a comparative method.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Hajj

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL2 204
POL2 204 - Pol Econ of Dev & Underdev

Overview of development studies with attention to major schools of political economy, their intellectual origins and centrality to contemporary debates about economic development. Topics include: colonialism, nationalism, and independence; postcolonial economic development models, policies, and strategies; perspectives on gender and development; changing conceptions and measures of poverty, development, and underdevelopment; contemporary debates in development studies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Bedirhanoglu, Candland

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

POL2 206
POL2 206 - Politics of Russia & Eurasia

An introduction to the history, politics, and international context of Russia and other countries of the former Soviet Union. The course will explore the creation, development, and dissolution of the Soviet Union, but will focus most closely on post-Soviet Russia and Eurasia. In doing so it will consider the interconnections between domestic politics, state-society relations, economic development, and foreign policy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors without prerequisite and to first-years with permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Logvinenko

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

POL2 208
POL2 208 - Politics of China

An introduction to the political history of modern China and politics in the People's Republic of China (PRC). Topics covered include: the decline and fall of imperial China; the revolution that brought the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) to power; Chinese Communist ideology; development and disaster under Mao Zedong (1949-76); reform and repression under Deng Xiaoping and his successors (1977-present); the political and legal system of the PRC; China's domestic and international political economy; change and contention in rural and urban China; case studies of significant areas of public policy in the PRC; China's ethnic minorities; and the political future of the PRC.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Joseph

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

POL2 211
POL2 211 - Politics of South Asia

An introduction to the politics of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Afghanistan, Nepal, Bhutan, and the Maldives) from historical and contemporary, national and comparative perspectives. Examines the relationship of political institutions to patterns of development. Comparative themes include: colonial experiences and nationalist ideologies; politicization of religions and rise of religious conflict; government and political processes; economic reforms; initiative for conflict transformation; women's empowerment; and obstacles to and prospects for human development.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Candland

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL2 214
ES 214/ POL2 214 - Soc Cause & Conseq Env Probs

This course focuses on the social science explanations for why environmental problems are created, the impacts they have, the difficulties of addressing them, and the regulatory and other actions that succeed in mitigating them. Topics include: externalities and the politics of unpriced costs and benefits; collective action problems and interest-group theory; time horizons in decision-making; the politics of science, risk, and uncertainty; comparative political structures; and cooperation theory. Also addressed are different strategies for changing environmental behavior, including command and control measures, taxes, fees, and other market instruments, and voluntary approaches. These will all be examined across multiple countries and levels of governance.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: POL 2214

Prerequisites: ES 102 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: DeSombre

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

POL2 217
PEAC 217/ POL2 217 - Politics of Mid East&No Africa

How do Arab-Islamic history and culture shape politics in the contemporary Middle East and North Africa? Why is the Arab world-despite its tremendous oil-wealth-still characterized by economic underdevelopment and acute gaps between rich and poor? How have the events of September 11 and the U.S.-led "war on terror" affected the prospects for greater freedom and prosperity in the Middle East in the future? What do the 2011 revolts mean for the existing regimes and prospects for democracy? These are some of the questions we will examine in this course. In readings, lectures, and class discussions, the analysis of general themes and trends will be integrated with case studies of individual Arab states.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 217

Prerequisites: One unit in Political Science.

Instructor: Hajj

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL2 220
PEAC 206/ POL2 220 - Qualitative Methods in Soc Sci

This is an introductory course for students interested in using qualitative methods in their research and studies.  By qualitative methods, I mean methods that involve small numbers of intensive observations, and that do not rely on statistical tests for drawing causal inference. The course is designed to help students develop proficiency in the use of qualitative methods in two respects. The first is to understand and be able to articulate assumptions about empirical reality and arguments about knowledge production. Next, the course will address practical considerations by helping students develop basic knowledge of principal techniques used by qualitative researchers like: navigating the IRB process and ethics of research, conducting in depth interviews, engaging in participant observation, and tracing archival and historical research.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: POL 2220

Prerequisites: One other course that satisfies the Social/Behavioral Analysis requirement.

Instructor: Nadya Hajj

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL2 231
AFR 236/ POL2 231 - Intro to African Politics

This course offers an introduction to contemporary African politics. The primary goal is to introduce students to the diversity of challenges and development issues facing African countries since independence. Questions motivating the course include: (1) Why state institutions weaker in African than in other developing regions? (2) What explains Africa's slow economic growth? (3) What can be done to improve political accountability on the continent? (4) Why have some African countries been plagued by high levels of political violence while others have not? 


In answering these questions, we will examine Africa’s historical experiences, its economic heritage, and the international context in which it is embedded.  At the same time, we will explore how Africans have responded to unique circumstances to shape their own political and economic situations.  


As we address the core themes of the course, we will draw on a wide range of academic disciplines, including political science, history, economics and anthropology. We will study particular events in particular African countries, but we will also examine broad patterns across countries and use social science concepts and methods to try to explain them. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: POL 2231

Prerequisites: This course was approved already, just asking for cross-listing.

Instructor: Chipo Dendere

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL2 304
POL2 304 - Nation-bldg & Natl E Asia

In an age of globalization, how can we explain the priority given to the nation-state and the intensity of nationalism in contemporary East Asia? Disputes over territorial claims, nationalist identity politics, state sovereignty and local autonomy, and competing histories dominate domestic politics and shape foreign policy in Japan, North and South Korea, China, Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia, and other countries in the region. This course examines past nation-building processes and related contemporary debates, e.g., Japanese colonial legacies; ethnically based development policies, territorial disputes, and demographic changes (migrant workers, immigration, defectors) that challenge traditional views of nation, citizenship, and political participation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: One course in comparative politics (POL2), International Relations (POL3), or East Asian history.

Instructor: Moon

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: This course may count for either the Comparative Politics (POL2) or International Relations (POL3) subfield requirement for the Political Science major.

POL2 306
POL2 306 - Sem: Revolution

A comparative analysis of the theory and practice of revolution from the seventeenth century to the present, with an emphasis on revolutions in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Questions to be considered include: the meaning and causes of revolution, why people join revolutionary movements, the international dimensions of internal war, strategies of insurgency and counterinsurgency, and the changing nature of revolution over the last 350 years. Case studies will include the French, Russian, Chinese, Cuban, and Iranian revolutions, as well as more contemporary events in East Central Europe and the Middle East and North Africa.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One unit in comparative politics or international relations and permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: Joseph

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

POL2 309
POL2 309 - Religion and Politics

For decades, political scientists were convinced that the influence of religion in politics was fading as the world modernized. Then, startling events like Iran’s Islamic Revolution in 1979 challenged this view and raised questions about the resurgence of religion as an important force in politics. For example, how do religious elites use their spiritual power to mobilize people for political ends? Can religion be used to dampen political conflict as well as to ignite it? Can religion be the basis of a political ideology that legitimizes who should have power and how governments should be organized? This course will seek to answer these and other questions about the interaction of religion and politics by exploring and comparing a variety of cases from across the globe.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: One unit in comparative politics (POL2), international relations (POL3), or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL2 310
POL2 310 - Sem: Community Development

Focuses on strategies for poverty alleviation, employment generation, promotion of social opportunity, and empowerment. Emphasis is on development in Asia (especially South and Southeast Asia), Africa, and Latin America. Considers women's leadership in social change, local control of resources, faith-based activism, and collaboration between activists and researchers. Examines activities of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and their relations with funders, governments, and other NGOs. Specific NGOs and development programs will be closely examined.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: Candland

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL2 312
ES 312/ POL2 312 - Sem: Environmental Policy

Focuses both on how to make and how to study environmental policy. Examines issues essential in understanding how environmental policy works and explores these topics in depth through case studies of current environmental policy issues. Students will also undertake an original research project and work in groups on influencing or creating local environmental policy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: POL 2312

Prerequisites: ES 214 or one 200-level unit in political science and permission of the instructor. This course is only open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor: DeSombre

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course

POL2 359
MES 358/ PEAC 358/ POL2 359 - Palestine Israel Peace Prosps

This course provides an in-depth exploration of the Palestinian Israeli conflict from a comparative and social justice perspective. Our goal is to provide an analysis of events to engage in constructive academic debates. The class begins by contextualizing the study of the Middle East within the broader scope of comparative politics and Peace and Justice studies. Next, we focus on the origins of the conflict: the debate about 1948, the consolidation of the Israeli state, and the development of Palestinian and Israeli political and military organizations. The course then delves into different dimensions of the conflict: regional geopolitics, international relations, environmental debates, gender activism, terrorism, and the “Wall.” The last portion of the class considers peace negotiations, conflict mediation, compromise, and solutions: the refugee question, Jerusalem, TRCs, and the role of the United States.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: MES 358,POL 2359

Prerequisites: One of the following courses - PEAC 104, PEAC 204 or instructor permission.

Instructor: Hajj

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

POL2 364
POL2 364 - Sem:Authoritarianism/Globalism

Even as globalization continues to be a potent force in world politics in the 21st century, non-democratic governments and authoritarian political movements are becoming stronger in many parts of the globe. The increasing chasm between a global economic system based on unrestricted flow of money, goods, and ideas on the one hand, and re-emergence of closed political systems on the other, present an opportunity to explore important questions in political science and political economics. In particular, in this seminar, we will learn the historical context for the modern episode of globalization, study new academic research on authoritarian regimes, and investigate the process of the economic integration of emerging economies like Russia and China. Finally, we will explore the rise of right-wing populism as a response to globalization in advanced industrialized economies of Western Europe and the United States.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One course in comparative politics (POL2) or International Relations (POL3) and permission of instructor. This course may count for either the Comparative Politics (POL2) or International Relations (POL3) subfield requirement for the Political Science major. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.  

Instructor: Igor Logvinenko

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL2 383
POL2 383 - Politics Intn'l of Migration

A comparative study of the politics of mass population movements across state borders, including refugees of military conflict and environmental damage, forced relocation under colonialism, labor migration, and international trafficking of persons. Analysis includes different forms of legal and illegal migration, government policies of sending and receiving countries, U.N. conventions on the movement of persons, civil society resistance to and support of migrants, as well as tensions between migrants' private and public identities. This course may qualify as either a comparative politics or an international relations unit for the political science major, depending upon the student's choice of research paper topic.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: One 200-level course in comparative politics or international relations or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Moon

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course will count towards either POL2 or POL3 subfields.

POL3 221
POL3 221 - World Politics

An introduction to the international system with emphasis on contemporary theory and practice. Analysis of the bases of power and influence, the sources of tension and conflict, and the modes of accommodation and conflict resolution. This course serves as an introduction to the international relations subfield in the political science department, and also as a means of fulfilling the political science core requirement of the international relations major.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Goddard, Logvinenko, MacDonald, Murphy,

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

POL3 223
POL3 223 - Internatntl Relations So Asia

Investigates relations between governments and states in South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bhutan, and the Maldives) and with governments and states beyond the region (principally with the China, Russia, and the United States). Focuses on wars between India and Pakistan; rival claims over Kashmir; the break-up of Pakistan and the creation of Bangladesh; conflicts in Afghanistan since 1978; nuclear proliferation; India's and Pakistan's competing relations with the China, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and the United States, and Bhutan's and Nepal's relations with each other and China.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Candland

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL3 224
POL3 224 - International Security

An examination of warfare as a central problem of international politics. The shifting causes and escalating consequences of warfare since the Industrial Revolution. The post-Cold War danger of a clash of civilizations versus prospects for a "democratic peace." The multiple causes and consequences of modern internal warfare, and prospects for international peacekeeping. The spread of nuclear weapons, the negotiation of arms control agreements, the revolution in military affairs (RMA), and the threat of terrorism and asymmetric war.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: One unit in political science or permission of instructor.

Instructor: MacDonald

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL3 227
POL3 227 - War & Revolution in Vietnam

An examination of the origins, development, and consequences of the Vietnam War. Topics to be considered include: the impact of French colonialism on traditional Vietnamese society; the role of World War II in shaping nationalism and communism in Vietnam; the motives, stages, and strategies of American intervention in Vietnam; leadership, organization, and tactics of the Vietnamese revolutionary movement; the expansion of the conflict to Cambodia and Laos; the antiwar movement in the United States; lessons and legacies of the Vietnam War; and political and economic development in Vietnam since the end of the war in 1975.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: One unit in social sciences or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Joseph

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL3 232
PEAC 221/ POL3 232 - Global Health Governance

This interdisciplinary course investigates the role of international organizations, governments, nongovernmental organizations, the media, advocacy groups, and individuals, to consider how and under what circumstances the international community comes together to address transnational health issues. Questions we will address include: What role should different actors play? What should be the ethical bases for promoting health? To what extent do global actors’ interventions promote health equity? Focusing on a set of health challenges that have particular impact upon the poor (HIV/AIDS, Ebola, TB, maternal mortality, mental health, and NCDs), we will disentangle the relationships between health, politics, ethics, and the international community, and consider some of the fundamental difficulties in health governance, including expanding health coverage, governing global health, and setting global health priorities.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: POL 3232

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Catia C. Confortini

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL3 236
PEAC 205/ POL3 236 - Gender/War/Peacebuilding

In this course we explore the gendered dimensions of war and peace, including how gender as a symbolic construct configures how we makes sense of war making and peacebuilding; how differently gendered people experience war and peace; and how peace and war are co-constitutive with gender relations. We pay particular attention to the “continuum of violence”, from the “private” to the “public” sphere, from militarization of everyday living to overt violent conflict. We address issues such as the political economy of war, sexualized violence, the militarization of gendered bodies, and gendered political activism. Finally, we reflect on the implications of gendered wars for the building of peace, looking at the gendered aspects of “post-conflict” peacebuilding and gendered forms of resistance to political violence.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: POL 3236

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Confortini

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL3 245
AFR 245/ POL3 245 - The Impact of Globalization

This course is designed to offer an inside look into the processes of globalization in Sub Saharan Africa and the Caribbean. This course will focus on the ways that international forces, the political economy and new technologies are affecting citizens and countries on the continent, as well as the way that African and Caribbean countries and actors are influencing the rest of the world.  We will explore a diverse set of topics including changing political landscapes,  digital & technological change and development, immigration, art and culture, foreign aid, and China’s role in Africa and the Caribbean. The course will attempt to highlight the new opportunities for citizens as well as the challenges that remain for African and Caribbean countries in the globalized world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: POL 3245

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Chipo Dendere

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL3 323
POL3 323 - International Pol Economy

Is globalization over? Are we witnessing a resurgence of protectionist economic policies with looming trade wars? Will China take over the world economy? Finding answers to these questions requires an investigation of how politics and economics intersect and work together on a global scale. This course analyzes how international economic structures operate and seeks to demystify the distribution of global power and wealth. We will focus on the complex relationships among states, business groups, international organizations, and civil society in the making of the international political economy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: POL3 221 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Bedirhanoglu

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL3 325
ES 325/ POL3 325 - Internatnl Environmental Law

For international environmental problems, widespread international cooperation is both important and quite difficult. Under what conditions have states been able to cooperate to solve international environmental problems? Most international efforts to address environmental problems involve international law-how does such law function? What types of issues can international environmental law address and what types can it not? This course addresses aspects of international environmental politics as a whole, with particular attention to the international legal structures used to deal with these environmental problems. Each student will additionally become an expert on one international environmental treaty to be researched throughout the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: POL 3325

Prerequisites: POL2 214/ES 214 or POL3 221 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: DeSombre

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL3 326
POL3 326 - American Hegemony Global Order

Since the end of the Cold War, the United States has been described as the predominant state—or hegemon—in international politics. American political, economic, and military dominance is said to be essential to the construction of the contemporary global order. This course explores this argument through an in-depth look at American foreign policy, from the Second World War to present. Why did U.S. policy become more internationalist in orientation? What tools has the U.S. used to shape global politics? Is U.S. policy driven more by domestic institutions and values or by external opportunities and geopolitics? Will U.S. predominance endure? Or will global order have to change to accommodate the rise of new powers?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: POL 221 or instructor permission of the instructor.

Instructor: MacDonald

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

POL3 338
POL3 338 - Nuclear Politics

This course explores the origins and effects of the spread of nuclear weapons in the international system, with particular attention to the effects of nuclear proliferation within states, and on state interaction. Historically, the course will cover the development of nuclear technology and strategy from the early twentieth century to the present day. Thematically, the course explores such questions of the morality of nuclear technology and strategy, the construction and conditions for nuclear deterrence, the motives and obstacles for proliferating states, the question of nuclear weapons safety, and arms control approaches in the international system.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: POL3 221 required; POL3 224 recommended.

Instructor: Goddard

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL3 339
POL3 339 - Sovereignty and Nationalism

The idea of state sovereignty has long been one of the key organizing principles of international politics. Yet this concept has always been contested, and criticisms have mounted since the Second World War. Anti-colonial movements sought liberation from overseas empires. Ethno-nationalist groups made demands for their own states. Globalization and new forms of global and regional governance challenged the dominance of the nation-state system. Norms of human rights and the “responsibility to protect” called into question whether state sovereignty is absolute. This course explores the contentious, and often violent, “revolutions in sovereignty” that have taken in place in world politics over the past seventy years. Through an in-depth examination of the politics of national liberation movements, decolonization, secessionist conflict, "state failure", and "nation-building", it examines the future of state sovereignty in our more globalized, interconnected world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: POL3 221 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: MacDonald

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL3 348
POL3 348 - Sem: Pol of Global Inequality

An exploration of historical and contemporary relations between advanced industrial countries and less developed countries, with emphasis on imperialism, decolonization, interdependence, and superpower competition as key variables. Consideration of systemic, regional, and domestic political perspectives. Stress on the uses of trade, aid, investment, and military intervention as foreign policy instruments. This course may qualify as either a comparative politics or an international relations unit for the political science major, depending upon the student's choice of research paper topic.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One unit in international relations and permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: Murphy

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL3 351
POL3 351 - Sem: Global Governance

Explores the challenge of global institutions in the new century within a larger historical context. Considers the function and role of the League of Nations, the International Labor Organization, the United Nations, the Bretton Woods institutions, the GATT, and the World Trade Organization. Special emphasis on comparing and contrasting international organizations in the three main periods of institution building: post-World War I, post-World War II, and post-Cold War. Discusses radical, liberal internationalist, and realist approaches.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: One unit in international relations. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: Murphy

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL3 352
POL3 352 - Sem: Small Wars & Insurgencies

We often think of warfare in conventional terms: states fight other states in large-scale battles employing uniformed soldiers to conquer enemy territory. In reality, however, there are many instances of asymmetric conflicts involving non-state actors who avoid open battles, whose fighters are indistinguishable from civilians, and who seek a wide variety of political objectives. Peasant revolts, communist insurrections, ethnic rebellions, and terrorist movements are among the various ways in which the weak have attempted to use violence to break the will of the strong. We address these wars from a theoretical, historical, and contemporary perspective. We will explore how classical theorists, including Mao Zedong and Che Guevara, adapted the ideas of Clausewitz to guerilla warfare. We will examine how rebel groups-whether the Spanish guerillas, Boer commandos, Chinese communists, or Serb militias-employed violence to intimidate their opponents. We will consider how globalization and the diffusion of military technology have transformed guerilla conflicts, and debate the implications of our theories for contemporary conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: POL3 221 required; POL3 224 recommended. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: MacDonald

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL3 354
POL3 354 - Sem: Rise&Fall of Great Powers

Power transitions are among the most dangerous moments in international politics. Scholars argue that when new great powers rise, they threaten the interests of other states, provoking balancing coalitions, arms races, and even major power war. When a great power declines, it can topple existing international institutions, and undermine the existing world order. In this seminar, we will undertake a theoretical, historical, and contemporary examination of rising and declining great powers, looking at historical case studies (such as the rise of Germany, Japan, and the United States), as well as contemporary cases (the decline of Russia, American hegemony, and the posited rise of China, India, and the European Union).

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: POL3 221 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: Goddard

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

POL3 378
POL3 378 - Sem: Empire & Imperialism

This course provides a critical overview of empire and imperialism in international politics from the eighteenth century to the present day. Key questions include: Why do states establish empires? Do empires provide political or economic gains? How are empires governed? What role does technology play in driving and sustaining empires? How do empires end? What are the legacies of empire? This course examines these questions by consulting the classic theoretical works on empire by Hobson, Marx, Lenin, Mackinder, Robinson and Gallagher, and Said. It also explores the historical practice of empire through structured historical comparisons of imperial conquest and governance in North America, Latin America, Asia, and Africa. We will also explore the contemporary relevance of the concept of empire for understanding postwar American foreign policy, including issues such as overseas basing, humanitarian intervention, nation-building, and military occupation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: POL3 221. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: MacDonald

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL3 379
POL3 379 - Weapons, Strategy, and War

This course examines the interrelationships among military technology, strategy, politics, and war. How have these forces shaped warfare from the introduction of gunpowder to the present? How, in turn, have developments in warfare influenced societies and politics? This course emphasizes select cases from World Wars I and II and the development of nuclear weapons strategy. How, for example, did the development of chemical weapons affect the battlefield? What ethical choices, if any, guided the strategic bombing of civilians in World War II? How did nuclear weapons change ideas about fighting war? The class concludes with an examination of the "war on terror" and its implications for strategy and politics.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: POL3 221 required; POL3 224 recommended.

Instructor: Goddard

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL3 387
POL3 387 - IR of the Middle East

A historical and analytical overview of the Middle East through theories and concepts of International Relations. Our goal is to understand the unique position and significance of the region in world politics with a series of discussions on major conflicts transforming the political landscape of the region from the late 19th Century on. We will cover tensions such as the Arab-Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Iran-Iraq War, the Gulf War, the Kurdish issue, civil war in Lebanon, wars and military interventions in Yemen and Syria. We will inquire direct and indirect involvement of regional and global powers in these conflicts to contextualize the region’s changing status in world politics. This course focuses on key incidents such as the current refugee crisis, social movements and the Arab Spring, political Islam, global Jihadism, political economy of oil, authoritarianism, and human rights violations to analyze large-scale processes across the region and their relation to world politics. We will analyze shifting axes of power in the region from the formation of the modern Middle East to the Cold War and beyond. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: POL3 221 required.

Instructor: Nazan Bedirhanoglu

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

POL4 107
POL4 107 - Hist. Political Thought Today

What’s the point of political theory in today’s world of light-speed information, global connectivity, and instant gratification? Why bother reading the works of European men who wrote them before the establishment of the nation-state or the introduction of universal suffrage? What could those thinkers possibly contribute to a world that’s bigger and more diverse than they imagined? Why are writers such as Aristotle, Hobbes, Mill, and Rousseau still important today? To focus our investigation, we will analyze different conceptualizations of “citizenship,” looking for continuities between these historical visions of citizenship and our own. We will also critically engage with the oversights, blind-spots, and assumptions in these works to make them relevant to a world that takes seriously the role of women, people of color, and non-heterosexuals in politics. We are not trying to justify the canon; rather, we are sifting through it to find what still is of worth, what can be salvaged, and what we are better off letting go.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Open to first-years and sophomores only.

Instructor: Martorelli

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

POL4 201
POL4 201 - Political Action and Dissent

An introduction to the study of political theory, and specifically to the problems of political action. Exploration of questions about civil disobedience, legitimate authority, ethics and politics, and the challenge of creating a just order in a world characterized by multiple beliefs and identities. Discussion of the social contract, liberalism, democracy, decolonization, violence, revolution, globalization, universalism, and cultural relativism, and differences of race, class, and gender. Authors include Plato, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Mohandas Gandhi, Fanon, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Grattan

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

POL4 243
POL4 243 - Democracy and Difference

One of democracy’s greatest strengths is that it gives political power to the people. But what happens when “the people” is a diverse group with identities, interests, and desires that pull in many directions? Does democracy function best when everyone is treated the same? As if there are no differences among them? But what if some people are marginalized, subordinated, or stigmatized? Could pretending these stratifications don't exist actually weaken democracy? This course explores how democracy grapples with differences through texts in contemporary Western political theory. We will begin with liberal theories of democracy. Then we will study feminist, critical-race, queer, and other theorists to understand democracy from the perspectives of marginalized, subordinated, or stigmatized groups. We will not search for definitive answers or hard-and-fast conclusions about when democracy functions best. Rather, we are interested in getting a better sense of democracy’s many dimensions and tensions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: None. Not open to students who took POL4 343. Open to first-year students only with permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Martorelli

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

POL4 248
POL4 248 - Power and Politics

An examination of the nature and functioning of power in politics, with an emphasis on the following questions: What is the nature of power and how has it been exercised in political life, both past and present? Who has power and who should have it? Is power primarily wielded by political leaders and bureaucrats, or has the development of new technologies decentralized power? Do the powerless understand and exercise power differently from those who traditionally hold it? Are power and violence inextricably intertwined or are they opposites? Authors include Bertrand de Jouvenel, bell hooks, Hannah Arendt, Karl Marx, John Gaventa, Michel Foucault and Adam Michnik.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: One course in political science, philosophy, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Grattan

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL4 249
POL4 249 - Neoliberalism and its Critics

Neoliberalism has been tied to everything from a decline in public life to the rise of right-wing populism in Europe and the U.S. What is new about neoliberalism compared to earlier forms of capitalism and liberalism? How has neoliberalism reshaped politics and citizenship? How has it impacted groups across intersections of class, race, and gender, and how have movements on the right and left sought to resist it? Is neoliberalism essential to democratic freedom as supporters promise, or does it signal the demise of democracy as critics warn? Authors may include Adam Smith, Milton Friedman, Sheldon Wolin, Wendy Brown, Lisa Duggan, Lauren Berlant, Michael Dawson, and J.K. Gibson-Graham.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: One course in political science, philosophy, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Grattan

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL4 311
POL4 311 - Sem: Grassroots Organizing

An introduction to the theory and practice of grassroots organizing for social change. Learning will take two concurrent paths. In class, we will examine what organizing is and how it has historically played a role in social change. We will ask how organizers: use storytelling to motivate action; analyze power, devise theories of change, and craft creative strategies; develop capacities, resources, relationships, and institutions to build collective power; and facilitate diverse groups in contexts marked by entrenched histories of oppression. Outside class, students will engage in a hands-on organizing project of their own choosing in which they must organize a group of people on or off campus to achieve a common goal.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One course in political theory or significant coursework related to grassroots politics, social movements, or social change, and by permission of instructor. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out an application via the political department.

Instructor: Grattan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL4 318
POL4 318 - Human Rights

Human rights are an important issue in countries around the world and in international politics. But what are human rights? Is there a universal definition, or do human rights vary across time and space? Who decides when human rights are violated? When is outside action to stop such violations justified? These questions aren’t just philosophical; they’re deeply political. How political communities answer them shapes domestic and international policies on issues such as state violence, humanitarian aid, citizenship and migration, (neo)colonialism, global capital, and efforts of various kinds to promote human freedom. This course will use texts in contemporary political theory and historical and contemporary case studies to explore the intuitively important, yet vaguely understood, concept of human rights. Case studies will examine human rights in the United States (for example, interrogation torture policy, Black Lives Matter, or sanctuary cities) and the international context (for example, the Holocaust, ethnic cleansing during the Balkan Wars of the 1990s, or the 2003 invasion of Iraq).

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: One course in political theory or philosophy or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Paul Martorelli

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

POL4 341
POL4 341 - Sem: Prison Nation

How and why did democracy in the United States develop in tandem with carceral discourses and institutions from the post-Revolutionary era to today? What role, if any, should punishment play in democracy? This course begins by evaluating the role of discipline and punishment in American political thought, ranging from the slippage between slavery and punishment in the 18th and 19th centuries to the rise of hyper-punishment in the era of mass incarceration and detention. We then focus in on the expansion of the carceral state since the late-1960s, paying particular attention to the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and capitalism. We conclude by evaluating debates between actors across the ideological spectrum who seek to reform, resist, or abolish the carceral state.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: One course in POL4 or American Studies, (specific courses in Africana Studies, History, Sociology, or Women's and Gender Studies may apply) or permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out an application via the political department.

Instructor: Laura Grattan

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

POL4 343
POL4 343 - Sem: Democracy & Difference

An examination of liberal democracy and contemporary theoretical challenges introduced by diversity and difference. From its emergence onward, classical liberal thought has been critiqued from many perspectives and voices. Its values of equality, individual rights, freedom of speech, have been seen as insufficient by radical critics, from Marxists to feminists, and as dangerous by conservative voices. How does the consideration of difference, understood by reference to gender, race, ethnicity, language, religion, nationality, and sexual orientation, affect our understanding of citizenship, equality, representation, recognition, and community? Study of democracy through Marxian thought, multiculturalism, and feminist critiques of liberal thought.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: One course in political theory or philosophy, or by permission of the instructor. Note

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

POL4 345
POL4 345 - Sem: Black Lib Haiti

Examines Black liberation in theory and practice from modernity through contemporary times, emphasizing efforts by Black actors and thinkers to reconstruct culture, politics, and economics. Key concepts include racial formation, racial capitalism, violence, necropolitics, revolution, decolonization, freedom, justice, radical imagination, emotion, and the undercommons. Cases may include transatlantic slavery, the Haitian Revolution, Black Marxism, Black Power, the Movement for Black Lives, prison abolition, and historical and contemporary coalitions between Black freedom struggles and the struggles of indigenous peoples and other racialized minorities. Authors may include Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. DuBois, C.L.R. James, Frantz Fanon, James Baldwin, George Jackson, Angela Davis, Audre Lorde, bell hooks, Toni Morrison, Claudia Rankine, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, and Glen Coulthard.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One course in political theory, philosophy or Africana Studies and by permission of instructor. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: Grattan

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

POL4 349
POL4 349 - Seminar: Sex in Politics

The Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v Hodges legalized same-sex marriage in the U.S. It also suggested that anyone who isn’t married cannot realize the full potential of being human. Obergefell’s dramatic swings between empowering and deriding LGBTQ people illuminate larger tensions in the relationship between sexuality and politics. Notably, marriage grants privileges to some, but not others, based on the state’s approval of their sexual preferences. The state, moreover, has historically regulated sex acts in ways that criminalize whole classes of people. These tensions raise key questions we will explore in this course: What role should the state play in supporting and restricting sexual practices? Should we look to the state to secure sexual freedom, or is sexual freedom achieved when we kick the state out of our bedrooms? More broadly, how are the boundaries of sexuality created in and through “politics”? To examine these questions, we will read queer theorists alongside contemporary political theorists.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One course in political theory or philosophy, or by permission of the instructor. Enrollment is limited; interested students must fill out a seminar application via the political science department.

Instructor: Martorelli

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: