ARTH 100
ARTH 100 - Intro: Art and its Histories

Why does art matter? Because images, buildings, and environments shape our ways of understanding our world and ourselves. Learning how to look closely and analyze what you see, therefore, is fundamental to a liberal arts education. Within a global frame, this course provides an introduction to art and its histories through a series of case studies, from ancient China's terra cotta army to Amy Sherald's portrait of Michelle Obama. Meeting twice weekly, each section will draw on the case studies to explore concepts of gender and race, cultural appropriation, political propaganda, and other issues through short lectures and class discussions. Site visits and assignments will engage with the rich art and architectural resources of Wellesley's campus.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Brey, Cassibry, Oles (Fall); Bedell, Liu, Oliver (Spring)

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: This course is open to all students; it is required for all Art History, Architecture, and Studio Majors.

ARTH 110Y
ARTH 110Y - FYS: Michelangelo

This first-year seminar examines the Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo Buonarroti (1474-1564). Although he is best known as a sculptor and painter, Michelangelo was also a poet, architect, civil engineer, and diplomat driven by complex artistic, religious, political, and economic motivations. His long career provides a framework for understanding the Italian Renaissance, and the mythology surrounding that career provides insight into changing perceptions of the artist and the individual during that time. Lectures, readings, videos, and discussions will focus on works of art and contemporary texts, as well as virtual visits to Wellesley’s Special Collections, Papermaking Studio, Book Arts Lab, and Davis Museum, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None. Open to first-year students only.

Instructor: Jacqueline Marie Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 200
ARTH 200 - Architecture & Urban Form

An introduction to the study of architecture and the built environment. This course is limited to majors or prospective majors in architecture, art history, studio art, or urban studies, or to those students with a serious interest in theoretical and methodological approaches to those fields.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 203
ARTH 203 - Iraq's Antiquities, Then & Now

This course explores the rich libraries, splendid palaces, and innovative public monuments that emerged in ancient Iraq between 3,300 BCE and 500 BCE. The royal jewels from the cemetery at Ur, the Law Code of Hammurabi, and the palatial sculptures from Nineveh feature among the case studies. The course also critiques international claims to these and other Iraqi antiquities, with a focus on their excavation by European empires and American universities; their acquisition by “encyclopedic” museums; and the digital colonialism of current replication schemes. We conclude by looking at the work of Iraqi-American artist Michael Rakowitz, who has recreated many antiquities to protest their varied display and ongoing destruction. Students leave the course understanding how Iraq's ancient art and architecture have been used to negotiate power from antiquity to the present day.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. Prior coursework in Art History, Classical Civilization, or Middle Eastern Studies recommended.

Instructor: Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 206
ARTH 206 - American Art, Arch & Design

This course will explore artistic expression in America from the time of European contact to the mid-twentieth century. Proceeding both thematically and chronologically, the course will highlight the range of diverse practices and media Americans deployed to define, shape, enact, and represent their changing experience. We will explore mapping and the platting of towns during the 17th and 18th centuries; the role of portraiture in colonial society; gender and domestic interiors; landscape painting and national identity; print culture, photography and the industrialized image; utopian societies and reform; World's Fairs, city planning, and urban culture; moving images, advertising, and mass consumption. As much as possible, the class will include site visits to area museums and historic landscapes.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None; ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 207
ARTH 207 - Diego Rivera

This course examines the life and work of Diego Rivera, one of the most ambitious, revolutionary, and controversial artists of the first half of the twentieth century. We will delve into multiple aspects of his long career, from Cubist experiments in Paris to his famous murals in Mexico and the United States; we will also study his myth-making autobiography, his relationship with Frida Kahlo, his interest in Surrealism, and his legacy in the US during the New Deal and Chicano civil rights movement. For Rivera, art was a weapon in the struggle for social and political change, especially during moments of crisis. Developed in conjunction with the exhibition Diego Rivera’s America, this class will hone your ability to think critically about visual images and their context. There are no prerequisites for ArtH 207. Students with at least two art history courses may enroll in ArtH 307, which requires additional assignments.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: James Oles

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 212
ARTH 212 - Modernism and Islamic Art

Beginning in the nineteenth century, the practices of artists, craftsmen, and architects throughout Muslim-majority regions were transformed by industrialization, colonialism, and the emergence of the museum as an institution. Through the study of a variety of visual, spatial, and time-based media, students in this course investigate the local, national, and transnational concepts that shaped the production and reception of modern and contemporary visual cultures throughout the Islamic world. While the Middle East, North Africa, and Iran constitute the geographic focus of the course, case studies may also consider images, objects, and monuments produced in West Africa, Central Asia, and Southeast Asia. Key topics include visual responses to colonialism, engagements with global centers of modernism, popular visual cultures, articulations of national and secular identities, and the reuse of prototypes drawn from real or imagined Islamic pasts.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: No prerequisites, ARTH 100 suggested.

Instructor: Alexander Brey

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 217
ARTH 217 - Historic Preservation

This course will explore the theory and practice of historic preservation. Beginning with a focus on the history of preservation in the United States, we will trace the development of legal, economic, public policy, and cultural frameworks that have shaped attitudes and approaches toward preservation of the built environment. To ground these theoretical discussions, we will use the greater Boston area as a laboratory for understanding the benefits and challenges of historic preservation. Students will engage in both individual and group projects that will emphasize field study of buildings and landscapes, archival research, planning, and advocacy. The course is designed for Architecture and Art History majors, but could also be of interest to students in History, American Studies, Environmental Studies, and Political Science.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: 200-level course in Architectural History preferred. Not open to students who have completed ARTH 317.

Instructor: Martha J. McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Only offered at 200-level Spring 2022.

ARTH 222
ARTH 222/ MAS 222 - Art History & Network Analysis

In the past decade, historians of art have increasingly turned to network analysis as a tool to investigate the production and reception of visual and material culture. Combining analytical readings with hands-on tutorials, this course introduces students to the conceptual and technical frameworks of network analysis as they apply to artifacts, works of art, and popular visual culture, as well as the people who made and experienced these images, objects, and monuments. Students will learn to model and analyze networks through the lens of art historical and material culture case studies. Topics may include social networks, geospatial networks, similarity networks, and dynamic networks. Case studies will range from arts of the Ancient Americas to manuscript workshops in Mughal India and Medieval France.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: MAS 222

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the Quantitative Reasoning (QR) component of the Quantitative Reasoning & Data Literacy requirement.

Instructor: Alexander Brey

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Degree Requirements: DL - Data Literacy (Formerly QRF); DL - Data Literacy (Formerly QRDL)

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: ARTH 100 recommended.

ARTH 223
ARTH 223 - Cleopatra in Context

This course asks how women’s identities were constructed and negotiated around the ancient Mediterranean. We will consider how the dutiful art of adornment conferred status and international prestige and we will address images of professions across social realms, from midwives to priestesses. With Cleopatra, Boudicca, and Zenobia as case studies, we will also analyze misrepresentations of queens who led in times of crisis. Students will leave the course with a new understanding of the material evidence for women in Egyptian, Assyrian, Etruscan, Celtic, Greek, and Roman art.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Kimberly Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Prior coursework in Art History or Classical Civilization recommended.

ARTH 224
ARTH 224 - Modern Art to 1945

A survey of modern art from the 1880s to World War II, examining the major movements of the historical avant-garde (such as cubism, expressionism, Dada, and surrealism) as well as alternate practices. Painting, sculpture, photography, cinema, and the functional arts will be discussed, and critical issues, including the art market and gender, national, and cultural identities, will be examined.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Berman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 225
ARTH 225 - Modern Art Since 1945

An analysis of art since World War II, examining painting, sculpture, photography, performance, video, film, conceptual practices, social and intermedial practices, and the mass media. Critical issues to be examined include the art market, feminist art practices, the politics of identity, and artistic freedom and censorship.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 40

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Berman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 226
ARTH 226/ CAMS 207 - History of Photography

Photography is so much a part of our private and public lives, and it plays such an influential role in our environment, that we often forget to examine its aesthetics, meanings, and histories. This course provides an introduction to these analyses by examining the history of photography from the 1830s to the present. Considering fine arts and mass media practices, the class will examine the works of individual practitioners as well as the emergence of technologies, aesthetic directions, markets, and meanings.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 20 7

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 strongly recommended.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 227
ARTH 227 - Art in the Age of Crusades

This course introduces students to the visual cultures of the Mediterranean in the centuries of the Crusades. It approaches the distinct local, religious, and imperial visual cultures of the Mediterranean as interlocking units within a larger regional system. Focusing on the mobile networks of patrons, merchants, objects, and artisans that connected centers of artistic and architectural production, it covers a geographical territory that includes Spain, North Africa, the Middle East, Anatolia, and the Italian Peninsula. Readings emphasize the theoretical frameworks of hybridity, appropriation, hegemony, and exoticism through which Medieval Mediterranean art and architecture have been understood. Discussions will highlight the significant connections that existed among the Western Medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic worlds.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 or WRIT 107 recommended.

Instructor: Alexander Brey

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 228
ARTH 228 - Modern Architecture

A survey of the major movements in architecture in Europe and the Americas from neoclassicism to the present.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 229
ARTH 229 - Islamic Arts of the Book

This course introduces students to the central role that the book has played (and continues to play) in the Islamic world. We will study the history of the Islamic book, from manuscripts of the Qur’an, which often feature refined calligraphy but almost never include illustrations, to historical, astrological, and poetic works – like the famous Shahnama (Book of Kings) – that contain images of various types and sizes. Students will learn about the production, collection, and circulation of these books, and ask how and according to which criteria they were conceived, used, and evaluated. In addition to traditional art-historical methods of close-looking and socio-historical analysis, students will learn to use digital approaches to produce new knowledge about the field. Visits to view manuscripts and related materials in local collections will supplement classroom discussion and assigned readings.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Alexander Brey

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 230
ARTH 230 - Frank Lloyd Wright

An investigation of Wright's domestic architecture in its cultural and historical context.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 231
ARTH 231 - Arch & Urbanism in N. America

This course will present a survey of American architecture and urbanism from prehistory to the late twentieth century. Lectures and discussions will focus particularly on placing the American-built environment in its diverse political, economic, and cultural contexts. We will also explore various themes relating to Americans' shaping of their physical surroundings, including the evolution of domestic architecture, the organization and planning of cities and towns, the relationships among urban, suburban and rural environments, the impact of technology, and Americans' ever-changing relationship with nature.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 234
ARTH 234 - Latin American Art

This introductory survey explores Latin American and Latinx art of the 20th and 21st centuries. Through a series of case studies we will investigate how these painters, photographers, muralists and others engaged international currents (from symbolism to conceptual art) while also addressing local themes, such as national and racial identity, class difference, gender inequality, political struggle, and state violence. We will also cover the history of collecting and exhibiting Latin American and Latinx art. This course has no prerequisites; students without an art history background are welcome. Advanced students who enroll in 334 will have additional assignments, including a research essay.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 99

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Oles

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 235
ARTH 235/ HIST 235 - Epidemics in Early Mod Europe

What can we learn from epidemics of the past? This course examines the art and history of the most devastating European epidemics from the Black Death of 1348 to the first smallpox vaccine in the 1790s. Topics may include the politically, economically, socially, and artistically destabilizing effects of mass sickness and death; travel bans, quarantines, and state-sponsored surveillance; the role of religious practices, images, and objects; xenophobia and its manifestations in art and society; the development of academic and popular medical practices; and changes in the appearance and function of art and material culture. Through close analysis of both art and history we will gain a better understanding of the destructive and constructive ways in which epidemics transformed their respective societies. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: ARTH 235

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Simon Grote (History) and Jacki Musacchio (Art)

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 236
ARTH 236 - Arts of Ancient Americas

This course will provide an introduction to the arts of the Ancient Americas from before the Spanish Conquest. Rather than a survey, we will concentrate on courtly ceremonial life in major cities from the Teotihuacan, Maya, Moche, Aztec, and Inca civilizations. We will explore specific artistic forms viewed across time and space, including palace architecture; stone sculpture; luxury arts of gold and feathers; textiles and costume; and manuscript painting. The course will also examine the history of collecting, with attention to legal and ethical concerns. We will consider the roles of archaeologists, curators, collectors, and fakers in creating our image of the Ancient American past. In-class discussion will be combined with the study of original objects and forms of display at the Davis and area museums.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Oles

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: There are no prerequisites

ARTH 237
ARTH 237 - Seminar: Who Was Frida Kahlo?

Frida Kahlo is one of the most famous artists in the world, the subject of a vast bibliography, both academic and popular, accurate and inaccurate. This seminar will explore how Kahlo moved from the margins to the center of art history. We will explore her life and work in detail using a wide variety of methodologies, readings, and assignments, in order to better understand the results of her complex self-invention. We will place her paintings in their historical context, but we will also study how she has been interpreted by feminists, filmmakers, and fakers. We will also use Kahlo as a jumping off point to consider broader topics, from self-portraiture to Chicano/a practice. Finally, whether you are new to art history or an advanced student, the class will help you develop the skills necessary to research, evaluate, and present visual and written information effectively and professionally.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Oles

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is also offered at the 300 level as ARTH 339.

ARTH 238
ARTH 238 - Chinese Art and Architecture

This course is a survey of the art and architecture of China from the Neolithic period to the turn of the twentieth century in two simultaneous approaches: chronologically through time and thematically with art in the tomb, at court, in the temple, in the life of the élite, and in the marketplace. It is designed to introduce students to the major monuments and issues of Chinese art and architecture by exploring the interactions of art, religion, culture, society, and creativity, especially how different artistic styles were tied to different intellectual thoughts, historical events, and geographical locations.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 239
ARTH 239/ SAS 239 - Art & Architecture of South Asia

This course covers the visual culture of India from ancient Indus Valley civilization through Independence. It follows the stylistic, technological, and iconographical developments of painting, sculpture, architecture, and textiles as they were created for the subcontinent's major religions - Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Islam. We will examine the relationship between works of art and the political, economic, and social conditions that shaped their production. It will emphasize such themes as religious and cultural diversity, mythology and tradition, and royal and popular art forms. Attention will also be paid to colonialism and the close relationship between collecting, patronage, and empire.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: SAS 239

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Oliver

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 240
ARTH 240 - Asian Art and Architecture

This course is a survey of the major artistic traditions of Asia including India, Southeast Asia, China, Korea, and Japan from Neolithic times to the turn of the twentieth century. It introduces students to Asian art and architecture by exploring the interactions of art, religion, culture, and society, especially how different artistic styles were tied to different intellectual thoughts, political events, and geographical locations. Students are expected to acquire visual skills in recognizing artistic styles, analytical skills in connecting art with its historical contexts, and writing skills in expressing ideas about art. Field trips to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Harvard's Art Museums, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and/or the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, depending on available exhibitions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 241
ARTH 241 - Egyptian & Nubian Art & Arch

The greater Nile Valley has yielded some of the world's most ancient and compelling monuments. In this course we will first survey the art and architecture of ancient Egypt and then ancient Nubia, Egypt's rival to the south.  Two class sessions will meet in the Museum of Fine Arts.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Freed

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 242
ARTH 242 - Roman Houses, Villas, Palaces

Romans designed the best houses, full of mosaics and frescoes, fountains and pools, sunlight and air. This course will teach you how to live in an ancient Roman home: where to put the dining room, what to plant in your garden, and how to hold a meeting in your office. We will analyze apartments at Italian Ostia, townhouses at Pompeii, villas around the Bay of Naples, and palaces in Rome. We will consider what mosaics can tell us about the empire’s networks of cultural exchange, we will compare house plans in the flourishing provinces, and we will survey the palaces that emperors built in their hometowns.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Prior college-level coursework in Art History, Architecture, or Classical Studies recommended

Instructor: Kimberly Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: ARTH 242 focuses on domestic architecture, ARTH 243 focuses on public architecture.

ARTH 243
ARTH 243 - Rome: Building an Empire

This is a course about the Roman Empire’s buildings; the art that once adorned them; and how these ensembles have been preserved over time. Key themes include the ancient experience of architecture, Mediterranean traditions of design, and the place of this complex heritage in modern politics and cityscapes. Case studies will focus not just on Rome, but also on cities across Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East, all lands that were once within the empire’s borders. Students will leave the course knowing how to use the Roman Empire’s roads, temples, and amphitheaters and understanding why preserving them matters.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. Prior college-level coursework in Art History, Architecture, or Classical Civilization recommended.

Instructor: Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: ARTH 242 focuses on domestic architecture, ARTH 243 focuses on public architecture.

ARTH 244
ARTH 244 - Art, Patronage & Society 16th C. Italy

This course will examine the so-called High Renaissance and Mannerist periods in Italy. We will focus in particular on papal Rome, ducal Florence, and republican Venice, and the work of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian, and their followers in relation to the social and cultural currents of the time. Issues such as private patronage, female artists, contemporary sexuality, and the connections between monumental and decorative art will be examined in light of recent scholarship in the field.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 245
ARTH 245 - House and Home

Domestic architecture is perceived as both a setting for private life and a means of public self-expression. This course will explore the duality of "house and home" by paying close attention to the changing nature of domestic environments in North America from 1600 to 1900. Topics will include the gendering of domestic space; the role of architects, designers, and prescriptive literature in shaping domestic environments; technological change; the marketing and mass production of domestic furnishings; the relationship of houses to their natural environments; and visions for alternative, reform, or utopian housing arrangements. Site visits and walking tours are a central component of the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 246
ARTH 246 - Collectors...in Baroque Italy

This course surveys a selection of the arts in Italy from circa 1575 to circa 1750. The works of artists such as the Carracci, Caravaggio, Bernini, Gentileschi, and Longhi will be examined within their political, social, religious, and economic settings. Particular emphasis will be placed on Rome and the impact of the papacy on the arts, but Bologna, Florence, and Venice will also play a part, especially in regard to the growing interest in scientific enquiry and the production of arts in the courts and for the Grand Tour.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 247
ARTH 247 - Intro Islamic Art/Architecture

What, if anything, makes a work of art or architecture Islamic? Islam has formed an important context for the production and reception of visual and material culture. This course enables students to develop a critical vocabulary in analyzing the arts of the Islamic world. Through the study of a broad range of objects and monuments including mosques, manuscripts, textiles, tiles, and amulets, students learn to hone their formal analysis of both figural and non-figural works of art, as well as their close reading of historical sources that reveal how objects and monuments were made and experienced. As students progress through a chronological and multi-regional overview of works produced from the emergence of Islam in the seventh century to the Early Modern empires, they also gain familiarity with methods for the study of Islamic art and ongoing debates within the field. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the ways in which cultural frameworks including politics, religion, ethnicity, science, and gender shaped the production and reception of images, objects, and monuments within the Islamic world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Alexander Brey

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 248
ARTH 248 - Chinese Painting

Chinese painting can rival the European painting tradition in the quantity and diversity of its output, the number of recorded artists of note, the complexity of aesthetic issues attached to it, and the sophistication of the written literature that accompanies it through the centuries. This course examines Chinese painting from early times to the turn of the twentieth century with an introduction to traditional connoisseurship. Issues to be considered include major themes, styles, formats, and functions of Chinese painting. Special attention is given to imperial patronage; the relationship between painting, calligraphy, and poetry; literati ideal versus professionalism; gender and display; and the tension between tradition and creativity. Trips to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 249
ARTH 249 - Japanese Art & Architecture

This course is a survey of the rich visual arts of Japan from the Neolithic period to the turn of the twentieth century with emphasis on architecture, sculpture, painting, ceramics, and ukiyoe. It examines Japan's close ties to India, China, and Korea and explores the development of a distinct Japanese artistic style and national identity. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical forces, cultural exchanges, religious thoughts, intellectual discourses, and commercial activities that shaped the representation and expression of these arts.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 250
ARTH 250 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites:

Instructor:

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

ARTH 250H
ARTH 250H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ARTH 251
ARTH 251 - Renaissance Italy, 1300-1500

This course surveys a selection of the arts in Renaissance Italy, focusing primarily on Tuscany and central Italy. This period witnessed the rise of the mendicant orders, the devastation of the Black Death, the growth of civic and private patronage, and, finally, the exile of the Medici family, all of which had a profound impact on the visual arts. The work of major artists and workshops will be examined and contextualized within their political, social, and economic settings by readings and discussions of contemporary texts and recent scholarship.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 252
ARTH 252 - Art and Love in Venice

This course examines art and life in the Italian city of Venice from circa 1500-1800, as well as its more recent influence on Boston's intellectual and artistic circles. As a wealthy merchant republic with connections across the Mediterranean and beyond, Venice was a critical location for art and material culture, whether created in the city or circulated through it. This course is linked to the exhibition "Titian: Love, Desire, Death" at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum; several sessions will be held with museum staff and students will learn about the planning and installation of exhibitions as well as the history of the Gardner Museum and its place in Boston society. Other sessions will examine resources in Wellesley's Special Collections, Book Arts Lab, and Davis Museum.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Previous courses in European art, history, or literature recommended.

Instructor: Jacqueline Marie Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is also offered at the 300 level as ARTH 352.

ARTH 255
ARTH 255 - Twentieth-Century Chinese Art

This course examines Chinese art in the socially and politically tumultuous twentieth century,which witnessed the end of imperial China, the founding of the Republic, the rise of the People's Republic, the calamity of Mao's cultural revolution, the impact of the West, and the ongoing social and economic reforms. Critical issues of examination include the encounters of East and West, the tensions of tradition and revolution, the burdens of cultural memory and historical trauma, the interpretations of modernity and modernism, the flowering of avant-garde and experimental art, and the problems of globalization and art markets. The course is designed to develop an understanding of the diverse threads of art and society in twentieth-century China.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 256
ARTH 256 - Celtic Art

In 2015, the British Museum exhibit “Celts: Art and Identity” shocked the public by suggesting that Celtic heritage was a modern invention based on ancient stereotypes. Our course follows the exhibit’s lead by first asking “Who were the Celts?” and exploring competing definitions of this term. We then turn to analyzing the exquisite artifacts that museums and textbooks typically label “Celtic.” Focusing on the period between 600 BCE and 800 CE, our case studies examine princely tombs from Germany, golden necklaces and coins from France, mesmerizing mirrors and shields from England, intricate stone monuments from Scotland, and manuscripts from Ireland. We will use this material to counter ethnic stereotypes developed by the vengeful Greeks and Romans and to assess how modern notions of Celtic identity map onto the reality of the past.

To learn more about these issues, read this response to the exhibition “Celts: Art and Identity

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. Prior coursework in Art History or Classical Civilization recommended.

Instructor: Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 257
ARTH 257 - Arts of Korea

A survey of Korean arts and architecture from the Neolithic period to the mid-20th century. The first part of the course discusses the religious and cultural transformation of the peninsula and examines selected examples of tomb murals, ceramics, and Buddhist art and architecture from early kingdoms. The latter part of the course will focus on the secular art and material culture of the Joseon dynasty (1392-1910) and the colonial period (1910-1945). Topics include Neo-Confucianism as a new state ideology and its influence on the aesthetics and tastes of the scholarly elite; the development of vernacular themes and styles of painting; the rise of popular taste; and, the shifting concepts of art and artistic identity during the periods of political transition.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 259
ARTH 259 - Art & Arch, European Enlightenment

This course will present a thematic survey of 18th-century European art and architecture from the reign of Louis XIV to the French Revolution (1660-1789). We will examine works of art in relation to the social, political, and cultural debates of the period, and how artistic practice engaged with new approaches to empiricism, secularism, and political philosophy spurred by the Enlightenment. Topics include French art in the service of absolutism, debates between classicism and the Rococo, public and private spaces of social reform, the Grand Tour and the rediscovery of antiquity, collecting, global trade, and imperialism. We will also consider Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment trends in Spain, Austria, and Great Britain.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Oliver

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 262
ARTH 262 - African American Art

This course will study art made by African Americans from early colonial America to the present. We will also examine images of African Americans by artists of diverse cultural backgrounds. Throughout the course we will analyze construction(s) of subjectivity of African-American identity (black, Negro, colored) as it relates to visual worlds. Although the course is outlined chronologically, the readings and class discussions will revolve around specific themes each week. The course is interdisciplinary, incorporating a variety of social and historical issues, media, and disciplines, including music, film, and literary sources.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Greene

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not open to students who have taken this course as a topic of ARTH 316.

ARTH 264
AFR 264/ ARTH 264 - African Art

As an introduction to the arts and architecture of Africa, this course explores the meaning and the contexts of production within a variety of religious and political systems found throughout the continent, from Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Mali, to name a few. We will consider important topics such as the ancient art outside the Nile Valley sphere, symbols of the power of royalty, and the aesthetic and spiritual differences in masquerade traditions. We will pay special attention to traditional visual representations in relation to contemporary African artists and art institutions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 264

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Greene

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 266
ARTH 266 - New Persp. Global City

This team-taught course introduces students to the study of the global city through an examination of key topics in urban history, planning, architecture, culture, economics and environment. Focusing on major sites from New York to Mumbai, we will look at the ways in which cities have been designed and represented, analyze the use of public and private space by men and women, and explore the construction of urban narratives, both in the past and in the age of cyberculture. The course will include guest lecturers and site visits.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Friedman, McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 267
ARTH 267/ ES 267 - Art & Environmental Imagination

Exploring the relationship between art and the environment, this course will focus on the land of the United States as it has been shaped into forms ranging from landscape paintings to suburban lawns, national parks, and our own Wellesley College campus. Among the questions we will consider are: What is “nature”? What do we value in a landscape and why? How are artists, architects, and landscape designers responding to environmentalist concerns? 

On-campus students will have opportunities to engage with the campus landscape and the Davis Museum Collection.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: ES 267

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Bedell

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 289
ARTH 289 - 19th-Century European Art

This course surveys European art from the French Revolution of 1789 to the Paris Universal Exhibition of 1900. Focusing on such major movements as Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Art Nouveau, we will examine the relationship of art to tradition, revolution, empire, social change, technology, and identity. Emphasis is placed on the representation and experience of modern life, in paintings by David, Goya, Turner, Manet, Seurat, and others, and in venues ranging from political festivals to avant-garde art galleries to London's Crystal Palace. Topics include the expanded audience for art, Orientalism, gender and representation, and the aesthetics of leisure.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Oliver

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 290
ARTH 290 - Pompeii

Frozen in time by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 C.E., Pompeii's grand public baths, theatres, and amphitheater, its seedy bars and businesses, its temples for Roman and foreign gods, and its lavishly decorated townhomes and villas preserve extremely rich evidence for daily life in the Roman Empire. Lecture topics include urbanism in ancient Italy; the structure and rituals of the Roman home; the styles and themes of Pompeian wall paintings and mosaics; and the expression of non-elite identities. We conclude by analyzing Pompeii's rediscovery in the eighteenth century and the city's current popularity in novels, television episodes, and traveling exhibits.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 or one unit of Classical Civilization recommended.

Instructor: Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 292
AFR 292/ ARTH 292 - African Art & the Diaspora

We will investigate the transmission and transformation of African art and culture and their ongoing significant impact on the continent, in Europe, and in the Americas. This course explores the arts of primarily western and central Africa, including the communities of the Bakongo, Yoruba, and Mande, among many others. The influences of early European contact, the Middle Passage, colonialism, and postcolonialism have affected art production and modes of representation in Africa and the African Diaspora for centuries. Documentary and commercial films will assist in framing these representations. The study of contemporary art and artists throughout the African Diaspora will allow for a particularly intriguing examination of postmodern constructions of African identity.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 292

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Greene

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 299
ARTH 299 - History of the Book

A survey of the evolution of the book, both as a vessel for the transmission of text and image and as evidence of material culture. Through close examination of rare books in Clapp Library's Special Collections, we will explore the social and political forces that influenced the dissemination and reception of printed texts. Lectures will cover the principle techniques and materials of book production from the ancient scroll to the modern codex, including calligraphy, illumination, format and composition, typography, illustration, papermaking, and bookbinding. Weekly reading, discussion, and analysis of specimens will provide the skills needed to develop a critical vocabulary and an investigative model for individual research. Additional sessions on the hand press in the Book Arts Lab and in the Pendleton paper studio.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Rogers (Curator of Special Collections)

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 303
ARTH 303 - CSPW: Public Art

One of the thorniest issues facing artists, art historians, curators, critics, theorists, city planners, and others who have to negotiate art in public places is the question of competing perceptions and meanings. As soon as a work of art is proposed for or installed in a site in which numerous publics intersect, or a work is destroyed, the question arises of “whose public” is being addressed. This seminar will bring to the table historical and contemporary case studies in public art, in part selected by students, as the subjects of several genres of public writing, among them reviews and Op. Ed. pieces. Students in all areas of art history will have already confronted, and will confront in the future, the question of who has the right to make the art, install the art, or destroy the art, in any geography at any time.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Any 200 or 300 level course in Art History. Open to Senior Art History majors only.

Instructor: Patricia Berman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 304
ARTH 304 - Sem: Villas and Country Houses

This seminar will examine the architecture, history, and literature of the villa, country house, and chateau from antiquity to the present. European and American examples will be studied through in-depth case histories, with an emphasis on the social and cultural history of elite country life as experienced by men, women and gender-non-conformists in a variety of historical contexts.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Any 200-level course in Art History or Architecture and permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Alice Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non-credit

ARTH 307
ARTH 307 - Diego Rivera

This course examines the life and work of Diego Rivera, one of the most ambitious, revolutionary, and controversial artists of the first half of the twentieth century. We will delve into multiple aspects of his long career, from Cubist experiments in Paris to his famous murals in Mexico and the United States; we will also study his myth-making autobiography, his relationship with Frida Kahlo, his interest in Surrealism, and his legacy in the US during the New Deal and Chicano civil rights movement. For Rivera, art was a weapon in the struggle for social and political change, especially during moments of crisis. Developed in conjunction with the exhibition Diego Rivera’s America, this class will hone your ability to think critically about visual images and their context. There are no prerequisites for ArtH 207. Students with at least two art history courses may enroll in ArtH 307, which requires additional assignments.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Two prior courses in art history.

Instructor: James Oles

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 309
ARTH 309 - Sem: Modern Houses of Worship

This course focuses on key examples of spiritual space from the 20th and 21st century, with particular attention to the relationship between historical precedents and Modernist innovations in abstract form across multiple traditions of worship. We will look at what makes for a spiritually inspiring building or landscape, examining the strategies that architects and planners have used in the past. We will take field trips to local sites.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 200, ARTH 228, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 310
ARTH 310 - The Extraordinary Interior

This course focuses on case studies representing highlights in the history of 20th and 21st-century interior and furniture design. A variety of building types and uses -- domestic, institutional, entertainment, and mixed-use -- will be considered, with an emphasis on the interpretation of style, new and traditional materials, social and cultural values, historical precedents, and the history of collecting.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 228, ARTH 231, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Alice Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 312
ARTH 312 - Sem: Art and Empire in the 19th C.

What were the possibilities and limits of representing foreign lands, cultures, and peoples in the long nineteenth century? How did discourses of empire, race, and power inform or complicate these representations? This course examines Europe's imperial and colonial engagements with India, the Pacific, North Africa, and the West Indies from 1750-1900 and representations of these engagements in the visual realm. Thematically and methodologically driven, a comparative approach will be taken to theories of travel, colonialism, and cross-cultural interactions. Such theories include, but are not limited to, Orientalism, postcolonialism, transnationlism, and their attendant critiques.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor. Not open to Firstyears.

Instructor: Oliver

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ARTH 313
ARTH 313 - Sem: Eurasia

This course examines forms of artistic and material exchange across the diverse cultures of Europe and Asia in the early modern era (c.1600-1800). Its aim is to realign Western Europe's art and history of the early modern period in relation to its continental neighbors. Case studies will be drawn from the Ottoman and Mughal Empires, the Dutch Republic, the British East India Company, and many more. We will examine how trade networks united various artistic traditions, and how artisans, merchants, missionaries and other intermediaries reinterpreted and disseminated practices of representation across geographic and cultural boundaries.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 13

Prerequisites: Recommended ARTH 100 or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Oliver

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 315
ARTH 315 - The Object of Performance

This course considers a history of performance art, a genre that features time-based media, technologies, and the archive. The curriculum covers performance art through a global lens and emphasizes queer artists and artists of African, Latinx, Asian, and Indigenous descent. This seminar prepares students to answer critical questions necessary for defining the field: What are the ethical, physical, and psychological quandaries that artists face from theory to practice in performance art? How does using the body as a medium challenge the “object-ness” of performance, and how does that impact its reception? What roles do artists, museums, cultural institutions, and their audiences play? What are the institutions' responsibilities for fundraising, staff support, and conservation of performance art? Students explore these questions along with key topics on ephemerality, experimentation, documentation, and audience reception to develop performance projects of their own.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Not open to Firstyears.

Instructor: Nikki Greene

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 316
AFR 316/ ARTH 316 - Sem: Race & Gender Contemporary Art

This course charts past and present artistic mediations of racial, ethnic, and gendered experiences throughout the world, using the rubric of the body. In the struggle to understand the relation between self and other, artists have critically engaged with the images that define our common sense of belonging, ranging from a rejection of stereotypes to their appropriations, from the discovery of alternative histories to the rewriting of dominant narratives, from the concepts of difference to theories of diversity. The ultimate goal of the course is to find ways of adequately imagining and imaging various identities today. We will discuss socio-political discourses, including essentialism, structuralism, postmodernism, and post-colonialism and we will question the validity of such concepts as diaspora, nationalism, transnationalism, and identity in an era of global politics that celebrates the hybrid self.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 316

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or a 200-level ARTH course or a 200-level AFR course or a visual culture course.

Instructor: Greene

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ARTH 317
ARTH 317 - Historic Preservation

Using the campus of Wellesley College as a case study, this course will explore the theory and practice of historic preservation. Beginning with a focus on the history of preservation in the United States, we will trace the development of legal, economic, public policy, and cultural frameworks that have shaped attitudes and approaches toward the preservation of our built environment. To ground these theoretical discussions, we will use the Wellesley College campus as a laboratory for understanding the benefits and challenges of historic preservation. Students will engage in both individual and group projects that will emphasize field study of buildings and landscapes, archival research, planning, and advocacy. The course is designed for Architecture and Art History majors, but could also be of interest to students in History, American Studies, Environmental Studies and Political Science.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 13

Prerequisites: ARTH 200 or permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have completed ARTH 217.

Instructor: McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is offered at the 200-level as ARTH 217

ARTH 318
ARTH 318 - Sem:NewEng Arts &Architecture

This seminar will introduce students to the visual and material culture of New England from the period of European contact to the end of the twentieth century, with particular emphasis on Boston and environs. Course readings, lectures, and discussion will address the broad range of artistic expression from decorative arts to cultural landscapes, placing them in their social, political, and economic contexts as well as in the larger context of American art and architecture. A major theme of the course will be the question of New England's development as a distinct cultural region and the validity of regionalism as a category of analysis. The course will include a number of required field trips to New England museums and cultural institutions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 320
ARTH 320 - Sem: Frank Lloyd Wright

This seminar will examine the buildings and theories of Frank Lloyd Wright, with a particular focus on two themes: Wright's designs for progressive and feminist clients across the long span of his career; and his relationship to the Modern Movement in Europe and the Americas.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: ARTH 200, ARTH 228 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 321
ARTH 321 - Seminar: Making Space

Focusing on case studies drawn from European and American history and contemporary practice, this discussion seminar will look at the ways in which normative notions of gender and sexuality have shaped the conventions of domestic architecture for specific cultures and time periods. The course will also focus on outliers, anomalies and queer spaces, examining the roles played by unconventional architects, clients, and users of houses in changing notions of public and private space and creating new ways of living. Readings will be drawn from feminist theory, queer studies, and architectural history. Weekly oral reports on key concepts, texts and/or buildings and in-class discussion are required in addition to written research papers.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 228 or a 300-level course in architectural history or urban studies or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Alice Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 322
ARTH 322 - The Bauhaus

This seminar considers Staatliches Bauhaus, the school of architecture, art, and design that was founded in Weimar Germany at the end of World War I, closed under National Socialism in the mid-30s, and reestablished in Chicago in 1937. Without knowing it, you are surrounded and inspired by Bauhaus-inspired designs, theories, and products every day. The class considers the historical position of the Bauhaus; examines the school's curriculum and faculty (among them, Paul Klee, Walter Gropius, Wassily Kandinsky, Marianne Brandt), philosophy, and practices; studies contemporaneous developments and contacts in the international art and design world; and examines the legacies of the Bauhaus in architecture, photography, design, city planning, and paintings. The seminar provides an integrative examination of visual arts disciplines, and it brings together interdisciplinary approaches to the historical movement.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: By permission of the instructor only. Preference will be given to senior Art History and Architecture majors and minors.

Instructor: Berman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 323
ARTH 323 - Sem: Jewelry in Antiquity

Many of us wear jewelry without realizing how it communicates. Yet jewelry highlights and protects the boundary between our individual bodies and the outside world. And precious metals and stones can reveal a great deal about a community’s trade networks, technologies, and aesthetics. Building on these ideas, the seminar will analyze the role of jewelry in communicating social and cultural identities around the ancient Mediterranean world. Case studies from the Egyptians, Greeks, Celts and others will address the craftsmanship, function, and meaning of ancient adornment. Virtual guest lectures from curators, conservators, and regional specialists will illustrate the range of expertise necessary to understand this intricate material evidence. Students will work with collections databases in order to research and design online exhibits of artifacts for their final projects.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Prior college-level coursework in Art History, Classical Studies, or Anthropology.

Instructor: Kimberly Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 325
ARTH 325 - Sem: Strong Women in Italy

This seminar will analyze women in Italy from circa 1300 to 1700 through the lens of both art and history. We will examine a variety of sources to understand women's lives and work; with this evidence we will see that women had a much stronger presence than previously recognized, as artists, writers, musicians, patrons, nuns, and a wide range of professions inside and outside their homes. The seminar is linked to a future exhibition at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts, and several sessions will be held virtually with museum staff. Other sessions will include virtual visits to Wellesley's Special Collections, Book Arts Lab, and Davis Museum.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Previous courses in European art, history, or literature recommended.

Instructor: Jacqueline Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 326
ARTH 326 - Art & Plague in Early Modern Europe

This course will examine the art and history of the Second Plague Pandemic in Europe. We will trace plague from the arrival of the so-called Black Death in port cities in 1347 through the many outbreaks of varying severity over the next four centuries, focusing on Italy but considering additional case studies across the continent. We will investigate how plague and the ensuing demographic crisis were represented in art and material culture, and how those representations helped people understand, and cope with, the world around them. Readings in primary and secondary sources, interaction with guest speakers, and visits to Wellesley's Special Collections, Book Arts Lab, Botanic Gardens, and Davis Museum will demonstrate the myriad reactions to plague and will give us the tools we need to better understand the COVID-19 pandemic.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Previous courses in European art, history, or literature recommended. Students who took ARTH 235/HIST 235 cannot receive credit for this course.

Instructor: Jacqueline Marie Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 328
ARTH 328 - Art & Food Renaissance Italy

This seminar will analyze the role of food in the art and life of early modern Italy. We will examine the historic and economic context of food as the basis of our investigation of its representation in paintings, sculptures, and works on paper from circa 1300 to 1800. This will entail a close look at food as subject and symbol, as well as the material culture surrounding its production and consumption. The seminar will investigate illustrated herbals and cookbooks in Special Collections, dining habits and etiquette, and food as sexual metaphor through a wide range of interdisciplinary sources; Wellesley's Botanic Gardens will grow Italian fruits, vegetables, and herbs for us to incorporate in Renaissance-era recipes.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Previous courses in European art, history, or literature recommended but not required.

Instructor: Jacqueline Marie Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 330
ARTH 330 - Sem: Italian Renaissance Art

During the Italian Renaissance, major family events like childbirth, marriage, and death were marked by both works of art and oftentimes elaborate rituals. In this seminar we will examine childbirth trays, marriage chests, painted and sculpted portraits, and funerary monuments, as well as a wide range of additional domestic objects that surrounded people in their everyday life. These objects will be related to contemporary monumental and public art, literature, account books, and legislation, as well as recent scholarship in art history, social history, and women's studies, to provide insight into Renaissance art and life.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Previous courses in European art, history, or literature recommended but not required.

Instructor: Jacqueline Marie Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ARTH 332
ARTH 332 - Sem: Casanova's Europe

This seminar will analyze the world of Giacomo Casanova (1725-1798), the Venetian author, diplomat, traveler, and infamous libertine. Casanova lived during a period of critical changes to artistic, political, and social life that shaped early modern Europe. We will examine his biography in this context, incorporating a wide range of primary and secondary sources to understand his role in history. This seminar is linked to the exhibition "Casanova: The Seduction of Europe," on display at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts in Fall 2018; several sessions will be held at the MFA, while others will examine resources in Wellesley's Special Collections, Book Arts Lab, and Davis Museum.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 13

Prerequisites: Previous courses in European art, history, or literature recommended but not required.

Instructor: Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 334
ARTH 334 - Latin American Art

This introductory survey explores Latin American and Latinx art of the 20th and 21st centuries. Through a series of case studies we will investigate how these painters, photographers, muralists and others engaged international currents (from symbolism to conceptual art) while also addressing local themes, such as national and racial identity, class difference, gender inequality, political struggle, and state violence. We will also cover the history of collecting and exhibiting Latin American and Latinx art. This course has no prerequisites; students without an art history background are welcome. Advanced students who enroll in 334 will have additional assignments, including a research essay.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: At least two art history courses.

Instructor: Oles

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 335
ARTH 335 - Sem: The Arts of Dissent

The visual arts play a critical role in shaping identity and formulating opinion. Recognizing the power of images and performance, participants in social and political movements enlist the arts in support of their work. In this case-study based seminar, we will explore ways in which the visual arts have been central features of social protest movements in the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. The class will take a trip to New York. In some meetings, we will work with Studio Art instructors to create and analyze student production.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Berman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ARTH 337
ARTH 337 - Sem: Song Imperial Paint Acad

The Imperial Painting Academy of the Song Dynasty China (960-1279), founded in 984, was the first of its kind in the history of world art. This seminar investigates the nature of imperial patronage and the institution and achievements of the Painting Academy (comparable to those of the Italian Renaissance art) in relation to the Song Empire. The seminar attempts to identify how exactly a particular imperial commission was initiated and carried out through critical reading of primary sources (in translation) that include artists biographies and case studies. Issues of connoisseurship and the relationship of painting/image and poetry/word are also examined.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to junior and senior students or by approval of instructor.

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 339
ARTH 339 - Sem: Who Was Frida Kahlo?

Frida Kahlo is one of the most famous artists in the world, the subject of a vast bibliography, both academic and popular, accurate and inaccurate. This seminar will explore how Kahlo moved from the margins to the center of art history. We will explore her life and work in detail using a wide variety of methodologies, readings, and assignments, in order to better understand the results of her complex self-invention. We will place her paintings in their historical context, but we will also study how she has been interpreted by feminists, filmmakers, and fakers. We will also use Kahlo as a jumping off point to consider broader topics, from self-portraiture to Chicano/a practice. Finally, whether you are new to art history or an advanced student, the class will help you develop the skills necessary to research, evaluate, and present visual and written information effectively and professionally.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Two 200 level ARTH courses.

Instructor: Oles

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is also offered at the 200 level as ARTH 237.

ARTH 340
AMST 340/ ARTH 340 - Sem: Disneyland & Amer Culture

One of the most-visited tourist attractions in the world, subject of thousands of books and articles, adored by millions, yet reviled by many intellectuals, Disneyland has occupied a prominent place in American culture since it opened in 1955. This seminar will examine Disneyland as an expression of middle-class American values, as a locus of corporatism and consumerism, as a postmodern venue, as a utopia, and as an influence upon architecture and urban design. In a broader sense, we will use Disney to explore the ideals, the desires, and the anxieties that have shaped post-World War II American culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 340

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or AMST 101 and a 200-level course in American or modern culture (history, art, literature, economics, etc.). Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Bedell

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 341
ARTH 341 - Sem: Landscape Painting

Landscape painting, or more accurately, shanshui (literally "mountain-and-water/river"), rose as an independent and major art form in the tenth century in East Asia as a great tradition in the history of world art. How did it develop so early? What did it mean? How was it used for? How does its past serve as inspiration for the present? And why does shanshui remain a major subject of significance in modern and contemporary East Asian art? Following the development of shanshui from the early periods to the twentieth century, the course explores such critical issues as shanshui and representation of nature, shanshui and power, shanshui and national development,  shanshui and environment, shanshui as images of the mind, the tension of tradition and creativity in painting shanshui. Comparisons will be made with Dutch, English, French, and American landscape painting to provide a global perspective.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in art history or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 343
ARTH 343 - Sem: Roman Monuments

From triumphal arches to souvenirs, and from tombstones to public portraits, ancient Romans excelled in the art of commemoration. Focusing on a different kind of monument each week, we will explore how Romans negotiated power through designs and dedications. In light of current debates about contested memorials, we will analyze ancient precedents for destroying or rewriting dedications to condemned emperors. We will also ask how modern commissions, such as New York's Washington Square Arch, draw on the authority of antiquity. Students will leave the course with a deeper understanding of how monuments work and how the Roman Empire's monuments still shape how we commemorate today.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 243 recommended; Prior coursework in Art History, Architecture, or Classical Civilization; or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 345
ARTH 345 - Sem: House and Home

Domestic architecture is perceived as both a setting for private life and a means of public self-expression. This course will explore the duality of "house and home" by paying close attention to the changing nature of domestic environments in North America from 1600 to 1900. Topics will include the gendering of domestic space; the role of architects, designers, and prescriptive literature in shaping domestic environments; technological change; the marketing and mass production of domestic furnishings; the relationship of houses to their natural environments; and visions for alternative, reform, or utopian housing arrangements. Site visits and walking tours are a central component of the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 recommended. Students who have taken ARTH 245 may not take ARTH 345.

Instructor: Martha McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is offered at the 200 and at the 300 level. Students in the 300 level section of the course will be expected to complete additional work.

ARTH 346
ARTH 346 - Sem: Poetic Painting

Poetic painting is a conspicuous visual phenomenon in East Asian art that at its best is technically superlative and deeply moving. This seminar investigates the development of this lyric mode of painting first in China and then in Korea and Japan from the eighth century to the twentieth through the practices of scholar-officials, emperors and empresses, masters in and outside of the Imperial Painting Academy, literati artists, and modern intellectuals. Literary ideals and artistic skills, tradition and creativity, patronage and identity, censorship and freedom of expression, and other tensions between paintings and poetry/poetry theories will be examined.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Seniors and juniors with prior coursework in art history only, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 347
ARTH 347 - Sem: Beyond Iconoclasm in Islam

The production and use of sacred images has provoked a wide variety of responses within the Islamic world. This class explores how sacred images have been created, viewed, destroyed, and reused within Islamic cultural contexts ranging from the Arab-Muslim conquests of the seventh century to the present day. Rather than progressing chronologically, it examines sacred images from thematic and theoretical perspectives. Topics include iconoclasm and aniconism, depictions of sacred figures and places, talismans and images on objects imbued with divine agency, and articulations of new attitudes towards images at key historical moments.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in Art History or Middle Eastern Studies, or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Brey

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 350
ARTH 350 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ARTH 350H
ARTH 350H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ARTH 352
ARTH 352 - Art and Love in Venice

This course examines art and life in the Italian city of Venice from circa 1500-1800, as well as its more recent influence on Boston's intellectual and artistic circles. As a wealthy merchant republic with connections across the Mediterranean and beyond, Venice was a critical location for art and material culture, whether created in the city or circulated through it. This course is linked to the exhibition "Titian: Love, Desire, Death" at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum; several sessions will be held with museum staff and students will learn about the planning and installation of exhibitions as well as the history of the Gardner Museum and its place in Boston society. Other sessions will examine resources in Wellesley's Special Collections, Book Arts Lab, and Davis Museum.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Previous courses in European art, history, or literature recommended.

Instructor: Jaqueline Marie Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course is also offered at the 200-level as ARTH 252.

ARTH 360
ARTH 360 - Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ARTH 370
ARTH 370 - Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ARTH 373
ARTH 373/ CLCV 373 - Antiquities Today Replication

New technologies that enable the 3D scanning and fabrication of art and architecture have become integral in attempts to combat the decay, destruction, and disputed ownership of ancient works. Our seminar contextualizes the development of these current approaches within the longer history of collecting and replicating artifacts from the ancient Mediterranean. We will think critically about the role that replicated antiquities play in site and object preservation, college and museum education, and the negotiation of international political power. Potential case studies include the Bust of Nefertiti, the Parthenon Marbles, the Venus de Milo, and the Arch of Palmyra, all of which now exist globally in multiple digital and material iterations. The seminar will culminate in a critique of the digitization and replication of Wellesley’s own antiquities collections.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CLCV 373

Prerequisites: Prior college-level coursework in Art History and/or Classical Civilization.

Instructor: Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 377
ARTH 377 - Methodologies

This seminar will offer an overview and critical examination of methodologies used in historical research in the fields of art history and architecture. It will be structured around in-depth examination of case studies and close readings of key writings, highlighting innovative approaches to works of art and architecture dating from 1500 to the present. In many cases, the authors of assigned readings will present and discuss their work, providing students with a unique perspective and analysis of methodologies ranging from cultural and economic histories to material and environmental studies. The course will also examine contemporary strategies for "decolonization of the curriculum" and anti-racist approaches to the art historical canon through analysis of the status of works by women, artists of color, and/or in non-traditional media.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: A minimum of two 200-level courses in Art History.

Instructor: Alice Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 390
ARTH 390 - Decolonial Art History

Unacknowledged colonial ideologies have for too long promulgated structures and values that reinforce a white Euro-American privilege within the pedagogy of art history. How does one confront the legacy of colonialism within art history—a discipline that has historically focused on and promoted Eurocentric cultural and artistic values? How can we understand artistic movements and institutions relative to colonial legacies? What do decolonial processes look like as they are practiced at the juncture of art history, art practice, and critical theory? Building on postcolonial studies, critical race studies, and critical museum studies, among other theories and methods, this seminar will evaluate the possibilities and limits of decolonizing art history.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or WRIT 107, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Liza Oliver

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 391
ARTH 391 - Persuasive Images

Visual images have always been enlisted to influence individual and collective decision-making, action, and identity. However, the rise of the mass media in the nineteenth century and the multiplication of visual technologies in the twentieth century have created unprecedented opportunities for the diffusion of persuasive images. This seminar enlists case studies to examine the uses and functions of visual images in advertising and propaganda and considers, in particular, graphic arts, photography, film, and other reproductive media. It also considers the interplay between elite and popular arts. The goal of the course is to refine our critical understanding and reception of the visual world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: 200-level courses in Art or Media Arts and Sciences.

Instructor: Berman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: