ENG 103
ENG 103 - Writers of Color Across Globe

This course takes a whirlwind world tour through the imaginative literature of writers of color across the globe.  Each work will provide a distinct, exhilarating, and sometimes heart-breaking experience of a world culture from the inside.  However, a number of overlapping threads will connect the works: generational change and conflict amid cross-cultural globalization; evolving ideas of love, desire and identity amidst cultural traumas; colonialism and its after-effects; the persistence of suffering.  The syllabus will include: Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart; Arundhati Roy's God of Small Things; Wajdi Mouawad’s family drama set in a war-torn Middle East, Scorched; Min-Gyu Park's contemporary novel about Korea, Pavane for a Dead Princess; the Argentinian Mariana Enriquez’s stunning short story collection, Things We Lost in the Fire; and Yaa Gyasi’s epic novel that traces a family’s history from West Africa to post-slavery America, Homegoing

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Prerequisites: Not open to students who have taken this course as a topic of ENG 113.

Instructor: Ko

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 106
ENG 106 - Harry Potter's 19th C.

Harry Potter is among the most famous of present-day literary orphans. But in creating him, J. K. Rowling was drawing on a long literary tradition. Nineteenth-century British fiction is especially full of orphan characters, and the Harry Potter novels are rich in allusions to the literature of this period. In this course we'll read and discuss some of the greatest British novels of the nineteenth-century: Jane Austen's Mansfield Park, Charles Dickens's Oliver Twist, Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, and George Eliot's Daniel Deronda or Silas Marner. We'll end with a discussion of Rowling's Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone, illuminated by a knowledge of the tradition in which she was writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Prerequisites: Not open to student who have taken this course as a topic of ENG 113.

Instructor: Meyer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 111D
ENG 111D - Elizabeth I in Literature

Queen Elizabeth I (1533-1603) was an anomaly. Ascending to the throne of a country that for centuries had passed royal power from father to son, she was a woman who remained unmarried and childless. Her reign was long and successful, and her era produced a flowering of literary greatness, by Shakespeare and others, unparalleled in English culture. How did she conquer the political odds against her and create a personal mythology that inspired a generation of poets? This course will explore the world of Elizabeth I and the courtiers and artists who adored her. Special attention will be paid to treasures from Wellesley’s rare books and museum collections that illuminate the life and culture of Gloriana, the Virgin Queen.

Wellesley Online courses are designed to be highly interactive and encourage group discussion; they require participation through live online class meetings throughout the semester, as well as work in a collaborative environment.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites:

Instructor:

Notes:

ENG 112
ENG 112 - Intro to Shakespeare

Shakespeare wrote for a popular audience and was immensely successful.  Shakespeare is also universally regarded as the greatest playwright in English.  In this introduction to his works, we will try to understand both Shakespeare’s popularity and greatness.  To help us reach this understanding, we will focus especially on the theatrical nature of Shakespeare’s writing.  The syllabus will likely be as follows: Romeo and JulietA Midsummer Night’s DreamTwelfth NightOthelloKing Lear, and The Winter’s Tale

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Prerequisites: None. Especially designed for the non-major and thus not writing-intensive. It does not fulfill the Shakespeare requirement for English majors.

Instructor: Ko

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 113
ENG 113 - Studies in Fiction

A reading of some of the greatest novels of English, American, and European literature, primarily from the 19th century. We will move carefully together through these extraordinary works, seeking to make their deep acquaintance through attentive, shared reading and to add them to your own life storehouse of important literary experiences. Taught primarily in lecture, this course will not be writing-intensive. Designed especially for first-year students and for non-majors, though all others are welcome. A likely reading list: Jane Austen , Emma; Heinrich von Kleist, The Marquise of OAn Earthquake in Chile; Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary; Charles Dickens, Bleak House; Henry James, Washington Square; Leo Tolstoy, The Death of Ivan IlychMaster and Man, Hadji Murad.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Prerequisites:

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 115
ENG 115 - Great Works of Poetry

A study of the major poems and poets of the English language, from Anglo-Saxon riddles to the works of our contemporaries. How have poets found forms and language adequate to their desires to praise, to curse, to mourn, to seduce? How, on shifting historical and cultural grounds, have poems, over time, remained useful and necessary to human life? Approximately 1,000 years of poetry will be studied, but special attention will be brought in four cases: Shakespeare's Sonnets; John Milton's "Lycidas"; the odes of John Keats; the poems of Emily Dickinson. The course will conclude with a unit on contemporary poets (Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, Philip Larkin, John Ashbery and others).

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Prerequisites: None. Especially recommended to non-majors.

Instructor: Bidart

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 116
AMST 116/ ENG 116 - Asian American Fiction

At various times over the past century and a half, the American nation has welcomed, expelled, tolerated, interned, ignored, and celebrated immigrants from Asia and their descendants. This course examines the fictions produced in response to these experiences. Irony, humor, history, tragedy and mystery all find a place in Asian American literature. We will see the emergence of a self-conscious Asian American identity, as well as more recent transnational structures of feeling. We will read novels and short stories by writers including Jhumpa Lahiri, Ha Jin, Le Thi Diem Thuy, Maxine Hong Kingston, Chang-rae Lee, and Julie Otsuka. Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 40

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 116

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Lee (English)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 117
AMST 117/ ENG 117 - Musical Theater

What is musical theater, what are its boundaries and powers, what conversations are the great musicals having with one another, who creates it and who doesn't? We'll have those questions and others in mind as we look at some distinguished musicals of the last hundred years, most but not all American. Some possible works: The Merry Widow, Show Boat, Porgy and Bess, Threepenny Opera, The Wizard of Oz, Carousel, West Side Story, Candide, Sunday in the Park With George, Evita, Wicked, Once More With Feeling (the musical episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer),Caroline or Change, Fun Home, Hamilton. Opportunity for both critical and creative and performative work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 117

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Rosenwald

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 120
ENG 120 - Critical Interpretation

English 120 introduces students to a level of interpretative sophistication and techniques of analysis essential not just in literary study but in all courses that demand advanced engagement with language. In active discussions, sections perform detailed readings of poetry drawn from a range of historical periods, with the aim of developing an understanding of the richness and complexity of poetic language and of connections between form and content, text and cultural and historical context. The reading varies from section to section, but all sections involve learning to read closely and to write persuasively and elegantly. Required of English majors and minors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Primarily designed for, and required of, English majors. Ordinarily taken in first or sophomore year.

Instructor: Chiasson, Noggle, Whitaker

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: ENG 120 is also taught as part of the First-Year Writing program as WRIT 120. WRIT 120 satisfies both the First-Year Writing requirement and the Critical Interpretation requirement of the English major.

ENG 121
ENG 121 - A Survey of English Literature

Students in this course will gain a foundational knowledge of the major texts and developments of English literature from its inception. The course fulfills the 120 requirement for the English major and minor. Starting with Beowulf, we will survey the tradition’s most durably influential figures, including Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, Pope, Swift, Blake, Wordsworth, and Tennyson. We will also explore works more recently added to the canon, by Mary Wroth, Aphra Behn, Olaudah Equiano, and Mary Wollstonecraft. Along the way, we will reflect on theories of the canon and on what a literary period is (for instance, the Middle Ages, the Romantic Era), and how periodization continues to shape the study of literature. Like 120, this course emphasizes the close reading of significant texts, in class discussion and essay writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Not open to students who have taken ENG 216.

Instructor: Noggle

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course can substitute ENG 120 as a requirement to the major.

ENG 150Y
ENG 150Y - FYS: Creating Memory

Participants in this seminar will delve into the workings of memory--a term that encompasses several different kinds of remembering and recollecting. What makes something memorable? Can we choose or shape what we remember? Does memory constitute identity? How has technology altered what and how we remember? As we ponder such questions, our primary focus will be on literature (including Shakespeare, Wordsworth, Emily Bronte, Christina Rossetti, Proust, Conan Doyle, Woolf, Borges, Nabokov, Morrison). We shall also draw on philosophy, psychology, and cognitive science and explore creative arts such as drawing, photography, painting, sculpture, book arts, film, and music. Students will write in several genres--creative, critical, and reflective-and experiment with different ways of collecting, curating, and presenting memories in media of their choice.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open only to first-year students.

Instructor: Hickey

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 202
ENG 202 - Poetry

A workshop in the writing of short lyrics and the study of the art and craft of poetry. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Chiasson, Bidart

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit. This course may be repeated once for credit.

ENG 203
ENG 203 - Short Narrative

A workshop in the writing of the short story; frequent class discussion of student writing, with some reference to established examples of the genre. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cezair-Thompson, Holmes, Sides

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit. This course may be repeated once for credit.

ENG 204
CAMS 234/ ENG 204 - The Art of Screenwriting

A creative writing course in a workshop setting for those interested in the theory and practice of writing for film. This course focuses on the full-length feature film, both original screenplays and screen adaptations of literary work. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 234

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cezair-Thompson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit. This course can be repeated once for credit.

ENG 205
ENG 205 - Writing for Children

What makes for excellence in writing for children? When Margaret Wise Brown repeats the word "moon" in two subsequent pages-"Goodnight moon. Goodnight cow jumping over the moon"-is this effective or clunky? What makes rhyme and repetition funny and compelling in one picture book (such as Rosemary Wells's Noisy Nora) but vapid in another? How does E.B. White establish Fern's character in the opening chapter of Charlotte's Web? What makes Cynthia Kadohata's Kira-Kira a a novel for children rather than adults-or is it one? In this course, students will study many examples of children's literature from the point of view of writers and will write their own short children's fiction (picture book texts, middle-reader or young adult short stories) and share them in workshops. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Meyer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 206
ENG 206 - Non-Fiction Writing

Topic for 2020-2021: Writing the Travel Essay


Topic for 2020-2021: Memoir

Topic for 2020-2021: Writing the Travel Essay

Taken a trip lately—junior year abroad, summer vacation, spring break? Looked back fondly or in horror at a family road trip? Turn your experience into a travel essay. We will be studying both the genre of the literary travel essay as well as the more journalistic travel writing found in newspaper travel sections and travel magazines. And, of course, we will be writing our own travel narratives. The course focuses on the essentials of travel writing: evocation of place, a sophisticated appreciation of cultural differences, a considered use of the first person (travel narratives are closely related to the genre of memoir), and basic strong writing/research skills. 

Topic for 2020-2021: Memoir

A workshop course on the study and practice of memoir, with the goal of making the autobiographical stories that matter to us, matter to our readers. We’ll focus on the essentials of memoir: generating and evaluating material, and developing voice, character, sensory details, structure, plot, conflict and tension, and scenes and dialogue. You’ll write two autobiographical stories, and then revise one. We’ll workshop each story as a class, and learn how to critique others’ work in order to better draft and revise our own work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to students who have fulfilled the First-Year Writing requirement.

Instructor: Sides (Fall), Holmes (Spring)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: ENG 206 is a changing topics writing workshop that will each year take up a particular nonfiction writing genre. Please note that this course is not intended as a substitute for the First-Year Writing requirement. This is a topics course and can be taken more than once for credit as long as the topic is different each time. Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 208
CAMS 208/ ENG 208 - Writing for Television

An introduction to writing for television. We’ll read, watch, and discuss pilot episodes of network and cable comedies and dramas. We'll study and practice the basics: script format, episode structure, story and character development, visual description. Each student will develop and write their own original TV pilot, and students will give and receive feedback through the workshop process.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 20 8

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Holmes

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 210
ENG 210 - History English Language

In 1774, an anonymous author wrote of the perfection, the beauty, the grandeur & sublimity to which Americans would advance the English language. In this course, we will explore the complex history that allows us to conclude that American English is not perfect and is but one English among many. We will study Old English, later medieval English, the early modern English of Shakespeare's day, and the varying Englishes of the modern British isles as well as those of modern America. We will read linguistic and literary histories along with literary passages from multiple times and places. We will ask, how does the history of the language affect our views of the world and our selves? And how are we continually shaping English's future?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Whitaker

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 211
ENG 211/ MER 211 - Women in Medieval Lit, 500-1500 CE

This course surveys medieval texts written by and about women across medieval England, Europe, and the premodern world. We will look at the medieval world through women’s eyes. How did text written by and about women represent gender and sexuality? How did they address the problem of women’s self-definition in a culture in prestige and creativity that was commonly shaped around masculinity? We will explore key genres such as love poetry, satire, romance, and devotional literature. Authors to be studied will include Marie de France, Christine de Pizan, Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: MER 211

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Laura Ingallinella

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 213
ENG 213 - Chaucer

What happens to the medieval Christian community when the unity of the Church breaks down? How does a narrative position its author and its characters within contemporary political controversy? Which characters are inside the traditional bounds of community? Which are outside? And how should we interpret the differences between them? In this course, we will examine these and other questions about medieval English literature and culture through the lens of Chaucer's writing. The course focuses on Middle English language and poetics as well as medieval structures of community-political, cultural, religious, and economic. The course will give special attention to how differences and conflicts, including those born of physical disparities and religious heresies, are managed within communities and portrayed in literature.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Whitaker

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 214
ENG 214/ MER 214 - The Global Middle Ages

This course surveys literary artifacts from the Middle Ages, focusing primarily on case studies that exemplify how medieval men and women constructed, endorsed, or revolutionized their perception of the world. We will explore key genres such as epic poetry, history writing, religious texts, travelogues, lyric, romance, narrative fiction, and theater. For each genre, we will discuss texts written or translated in medieval England side by side with counterparts originating in Africa, and Asia, and Europe. Topics include the Song of Roland, John Mandeville’s Travels, Barlaam and Iosaphat, the Letter of Prester John, and The Thousand and One Nights.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: MER 214

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Ingallinella

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 220
ENG 220 - Happiness

How does literature help us understand what it means to be happy? What kinds of happiness do the “happy endings” of fiction propose (and why is happiness associated with endings, not middles or beginnings)? In this course, we’ll survey various ways literature has presented happiness: sometimes as a feeling, either vividly immediate (joy, pleasure, elation) or longer term (contentment, fulfillment); at others, as an objective condition, such as prosperity or flourishing. We’ll start with some ancient Greek-Roman philosophy, then focus on novels and poetry of the Enlightenment, when the pursuit of happiness (with life and liberty) became a political imperative. Readings will include works by Henry Fielding, Jane Austen, Alexander Pope, Samuel Johnson, and Olaudah Equiano. We’ll conclude with recent texts that consider how happiness may thrive and fail under current class, family, labor, and other social conditions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites:

Instructor: James Noggle

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 221
ENG 221/ HIST 221 - The Renaissance

This interdisciplinary survey of Europe between 1300 and 1600 focuses on aspects of politics, literature, philosophy, religion, economics, and the arts that have prompted scholars for the past seven hundred years to regard it as an age of cultural rebirth.  These include the revival of classical learning; new fashions in painting, sculpture, architecture, poetry, and prose; the politics of the Italian city-states and Europe’s “new monarchies”; religious reform; literacy and printing; the emerging public theater; new modes of representing selfhood; and the contentious history of Renaissance as a concept.  Authors include Petrarch, Vasari, Machiavelli, Erasmus, More, Castiglione, Rabelais, Montaigne, Sidney, Spenser, and Shakespeare.  Lectures and discussions will be enriched by guest speakers and visits to Wellesley’s art and rare book collections.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 221

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Grote and Wall-Randell (English)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 222
ENG 222 - Renaissance Literature

This changing-topics course encourages students and faculty to pursue special interests in the study of major writers and ideas during the Renaissance, the period of European history between the 14th and 17th centuries.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites:

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This is a topics course and can be taken more than once for credit as long as the topic is different each time.

ENG 223
ENG 223 - Shakespeare I: Elizabethan Period

The formative period of Shakespeare's genius: comedies such as A Midsummer Night's Dream and Twelfth Night; histories such as Henry IV (Part I); and tragedies such as Hamlet. We will undertake detailed study of Shakespeare's poetic language and will examine the dramatic form of the plays and the performance practices of Shakespeare's time. We will also explore important themes that inform the plays, from gender relations and identities to social class and nationhood. Viewing and analysis of contemporary performances and films will be integrated into the work of the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Wall-Randell

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 224
ENG 224 - Shakespeare II: Jacobean Period

The great tragedies and the redemptive romances from the second half of Shakespeare's career, which include Troilus and Cressida, Measure for Measure,Othello, King Lear, Coriolanus, Antony and Cleopatra, Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest. While encompassing thematic concerns ranging from gender relations to the meaning of heroism, particular focus will fall on tragic form and its transformation in the romances. Extensive attention will be paid to theatrical practices, Shakespearean and contemporary, aided by the viewing of stage performances and film adaptations.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Ko

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 227
ENG 227 - Milton

Milton helped set the standard of literary power for generations of writers after him. His epic Paradise Lost exemplifies poetic inspiration, sublimity, creativity, originality, and unconventionality, offering a richness of meaning and emotion that seems to provoke violently incompatible interpretations, even radical uncertainty about whether his work is good or bad. This course will focus on how this poem challenges and expands our views of God, evil, heroism, Hell, good, Heaven, pain, bliss, sex, sin, and failure in startling ways. We will consider Milton as the prototype of a new kind of poet who pushes meaning to its limit, from his early writings, to Paradise Lost, to Paradise Regain'd at his career's end, and sample the range of critical responses his poetry has elicited.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Noggle

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 234
ENG 234 - Dark Side of the Enlightenment

The period known as the Enlightenment (roughly 1660-1789) promoted individual rights, attacked superstition and advanced science, dramatically expanded literacy and publishing, brought women as readers and writers into a burgeoning literary marketplace, and created the public sphere. Yet the era also massively increased the trans-Atlantic slave trade, devised new forms of racism and anti-feminism, and established European colonialism as a world system. This course will examine British literature that confronts these complexities. We’ll read novels like Behn’s Oroonoko, Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, and Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels that portray encounters between Europeans and the non-European “Other”; poems by Alexander Pope and Mary Wortley Montagu that explore the nature of women and femininity; and texts that find the limits of Enlightenment reason in uncertainty, strong passions, and madness.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Noggle

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 241
ENG 241 - Romantic Poetry

Essential works of a group of poets unsurpassed in poetic achievement and influence: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, and Keats. Selections from Dorothy Wordsworth and others. We'll explore and interrogate prominent themes of Romanticism, including imagination, memory; creation, childhood, nature, the self, concern for the marginalized and oppressed, sympathy, social critique, encounters with otherness, the lure of the unknown, inspiration as "spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings," dejection and writer's block, bipolar poetry, influence (from opium to "the viewless wings of Poesy"), beauty, truth, fancy, illusion; rebellion, revolution, transgression, exile, the Byronic hero, the femme fatale, the muse, complexity, ambiguity, mystery; mortality, immortality.  Open to majors and non-majors. no poetry background required. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Hickey

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 245
ENG 245 - Victorian Poetry

Victorian poems stand among the most memorable and best-loved in all of English verse: they're evocative, emotionally powerful, idiosyncratic, psychologically loaded, intellectually engaged, daring, inspiring, and bizarre. We'll study Tennyson, the Brownings, Emily Brontë, the Rossettis, Arnold, Hopkins, and Hardy, with attention to their technique and place in literary history. Themes will include the power and limits of language, tradition and originality, love and sexuality, gender roles, the literary expression of personal crisis, religious faith and doubt, evolution, industrialism, and the role of art. Supplementary prose readings and forays into art history will illuminate literary, aesthetic, and social contexts, particularly those surrounding the Woman Question, female authorship, and representations of female figures.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Hickey

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 246
ENG 246 - Victorian, Decadent, Beyond

The Victorian period, spanning roughly eight decades of literary tradition and innovation between Romanticism and Modernism, gave rise to some of the most memorable and best-loved works of literature in the English language: The texts for this course--mostly poems, some essays and short fiction, one play--include writings of Tennyson, Browning, Emily Brontë, the Rossettis and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Arnold, Hopkins, Wilde, Hardy, fin-de-siècle Aesthetes and Decadents, early Yeats, and World War I poet Wilfred Owen. They are evocative, emotionally powerful, idiosyncratic, psychologically loaded, intellectually engaged, sensual, daring, inspiring, harrowing, and bizarre. We'll trace thematic and stylistic connections, analyzing diverse representations of love, longing, loss, the power and limits of words, Medievalism, marriage and its discontents, gender dynamics, the Woman Question, women's authorship, queer eroticism, beauty, art, artifice, aesthetic and sensual pleasures, pain, suffering, sacrifice, the pity of war, repression, depravity, "madness," spiritual crisis, the horrors of war, and fears for the future of civilization. A Book Arts workshop and readings from Pater, Ruskin, Mill, Arnold, and William Morris will further illuminate the role of artists, artisans, and consumers of art.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Hickey

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 247
CPLT 247/ ENG 247/ MER 247 - Arthurian Legends

The legends of King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table, with their themes of chivalry, magic, friendship, war, adventure, corruption, and nostalgia, as well as romantic love and betrayal, make up one of the most influential and enduring mythologies in European culture. This course will examine literary interpretations of the Arthurian legend, in history, epic, and romance, from the sixth century through the sixteenth. We will also consider some later examples of Arthuriana, on page and movie screen, in the Victorian and modern periods.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: CPLT 247,MER 247

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Wall-Randell

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 248
AMST 248/ ENG 248 - Poetics of the Body

Sensual and emotionally powerful, American poetry of the body explores living and knowing through physical, bodily experience. From Walt Whitman’s “I Sing the Body Electric” to contemporary spoken word performances, body poems move us through the strangeness and familiarity of embodiment, voicing the manifold discomforts, pains, pleasures, and ecstasies of living in and through bodies. We’ll trace a number of recurring themes: the relationship between body and mind, female embodiment, queer bodies, race, sexuality, disability, illness and medicine, mortality, appetite, and the poem itself as a body.  Poets include Whitman, Dickinson, Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Frank O’Hara, Frank Bidart, Rita Dove, Thom Gunn, Claudia Rankine, Ocean Vuong, Tyehimba Jess, Jos Charles, Tina Chang, Max Ritvo, Laurie Lambeth, Chen Chen, and Danez Smith.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 248

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Kathleen Brogan

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 249
ENG 249 - Poetry Now

A study of American poetry in the last two years. Emphasis on poets with one or two books. Students will write short review-essays. Authors may include: Sally Wen Mao, Terrance Hayes, Danez Smith, jos charles, AE Stallings, Jenny Xie, Natalie Scenters-Zapico, Shane Macrae, J. Michael Martinez, and Jana Prikryl.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Chiasson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 251
ENG 251 - Modern Poetry

The modernist revolution at the beginning of the twentieth century is one of the most important revolutions in the history of English—writers radically rethought what a poem is, what a novel is, what writing itself is. We are still the heirs of the great innovators who emerged during that time: Yeats, Eliot, Pound, Frost, Moore, Stevens, Williams, Hughes. In this course we will look at what connects their work and the profound divisions among them.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 253
ENG 253 - Contemporary American Poetry

A survey of the great poems and poets of the last 50 years, a period when serious poetry has often had to remind us it even exists. Our poets articulate the inside story of what being an American person feels like in an age of mounting visual spectacle, and in an environment where identities are suddenly, often thrillingly, sometimes distressingly, in question. Poets include: Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, the poets of “The New York School” (John Ashbery, Frank O'Hara, Barbara Guest, James Schuyler), Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, A.R. Ammons, Louise Glück, Robert Pinsky, Anne Carson, Susan Howe, Frank Bidart, Jorie Graham, D.A. Powell, Terrance Hayes, Tracy K. Smith, and others.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 45

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Bidart

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 254
ENG 254 - Louise Glück

Louise Glück is undoubtedly a major poet-not only a great love poet, but a maker of books with enormous and unpredictable ambition. Each new book has been on the expanding frontier of aesthetic discovery. With the publication of her collected Poems 1962-2012, her poems can economically be seen as a whole. Poems 1962-2012 consists of 11 volumes; one volume will be studied each week. This will be supplemented by Faithful and Virtuous Night (her 2014 volume that won the National Book Award). After her first book she achieves, augments, and enlarges her mastery, book after book. The shifts in style and subject matter are never predictable but in retrospect seem inevitable.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Bidart

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit. Not open to students who have taken this course as a topic of ENG 355.

ENG 258
AMST 258/ ENG 258 - Gotham: New York in Lit & Art

This course examines that icon of modernity, New York City, as it appears in literature, art, and film. We'll cross neighborhoods and centuries to consider how Americans have variously envisioned this cultural and financial capital. We'll also consider how each imagining of the city returns us to crucial questions of perspective, identity, and ownership. How does the city become legible to its inhabitants, and how do readings of the city vary according to one's physical, cultural, and social position in it? Authors may include: Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Edith Wharton, Anzia Yezierska, Ralph Ellison, Paule Marshall, Chang-rae Lee, Teju Cole, and Colson Whitehead. Artists include, among others, John Sloan, Helen Levitt and Berenice Abbott; filmmakers Vincente Minnelli, Martin Scorsese, and Spike Lee.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 258

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Brogan

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 260
AFR 201/ ENG 260 - African-Amer Lit Tradition

A survey of the Afro-American experience as depicted in literature from the eighteenth century through the present. Study of various forms of literary expression including the short story, autobiography, literary criticism, poetry, drama, and essays as they have been used as vehicles of expression for Black writers during and since the slave experience.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 260

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 261
AMST 261/ ENG 261 - Hollywood: Vietnam to Reagan

Between the breakdown of the studio system and the advent of the blockbuster era, American filmmaking enjoyed a decade of extraordinary achievement. We'll study a range of great films produced in the late 60s and 70s, such as Bonnie and Clyde, Taxi Driver, The Godfather, Chinatown, Annie Hall, Shampoo, Carrie, and Apocalypse Now, exploring their distinctive combination of American genre and European art-film style, and connecting them to the social and political contexts of this turbulent moment in American history.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 261

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Vernon Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 262
AMST 262/ ENG 262 - American Literature to 1865

This is the greatest, most thrilling and inspiring period in American literary history, and the central theme represented and explored in it is freedom, and its relationship to power. Power and freedom—the charged and complex dynamics of these intersecting terms, ideas, and conflicted realities: we will examine this theme in literature, religion, social reform, sexual and racial liberation, and more. Authors to be studied will include Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Douglass, Stowe, Henry James. We will enrich our work by studying films dealing with the period—for example, Edward Zwick’s Glory (1989), about one of the first regiments of African-American troops, and Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln (2012).; and we also will consider the visual arts—photography and American landscape painting. The literature that we will read and respond to in this course was written 150 years ago, but the issues that these writers engage are totally relevant to who we are and where we are today. In important ways this is really a course in contemporary American literature.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 262

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cain

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 263
ENG 263/ PEAC 263 - Amer Liter & Soc Justice

A study of American fictions, plays, songs, essays, memoirs, and films dealing with questions of justice in the relations between races, ethnic groups, genders, and classes. General discussion of the relations between justice and literature, specific discussion of what particular works suggest about particular social questions. Possible authors and works: Rebecca Harding Davis, Life in the Iron Mills; Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward; Upton Sinclair,The Jungle; Marc Blitzstein, The Cradle Will Rock; John Steinbeck, Grapes of Wrath; poems about the Sacco and Vanzetti case; Lorraine Hansberry's Raisin in the Sun; poems by Langston Hughes, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Muriel Rukeyser, Robert Lowell, Adrienne Rich; memoirs by Jane Addams, Dorothy Day, James Baldwin, Martin Luther King, Barbara Deming, Ta-Nehisi Coates; accounts of the Japanese internment camps plays by the Teatro Campesino and Anna Deveare Smith; songs by Joe Hill, Billie Holiday, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Nina Simone, Janelle Monáe. Opportunity for both critical and creative work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 263

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Rosenwald

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 264
ENG 264/ PEAC 264 - Antiwar Literature

A consideration of antiwar literature, in many of its forms - novels, plays, songs, cantatas, treatises, memoirs, poems, epics - and in many of the times and places in which it has been created, from the Bhagavad-Gita and Homer’s Iliad to Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried and whatever antiwar literature is being created now. Consideration also of more general issues: the definition of antiwar literature, the representation of antiwar activity, the nature of literature made by pacifists, the ethics of war and resistance to war, the nature of personal and collective responsibility in war, the critical controversies over whether explicitly antiwar literature can be of genuine literary excellence.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 264

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Rosenwald

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 265
AFR 265/ ENG 265 - African-American Biographies

This course traces the life stories of prominent African Americans, which, in their telling, have led to dramatic changes in the lives of African American people. Some were slaves; some were investigative journalists; some were novelists; and one is the president of the United States. We will examine the complex relationship between the community and the individual, the personal and the political and how these elements interact to form a unique African American person. The course also draws on related video presentations to dramatize these life stories. Authors include Linda Brent, Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells, Richard Wright, Maya Angelou, Malcolm X, and Barack Obama.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 265

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

ENG 266
AMST 266/ ENG 266 - Am Lit from Civil War to 1930s

Topic for 2020-21: From Page to Screen: American Novels and Films

Topic for 2020-21: From Page to Screen: American Novels and Films

This course will focus on important American novels from the late nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century, and the attempts (sometimes successful, sometimes not, but always interesting) to turn them into movies, translating them from the page to the screen. Authors to be studied will include Henry James, Willa Cather, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Carson McCullers, Edith Wharton, and Patricia Highsmith. Perhaps the main question we will ask is this: Is it possible to turn a great book, especially a great novel, into a great or even a good movie?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 266

Instructor: Cain

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: This is a topics course and can be taken more than once for credit as long as the topic is different each time.

ENG 267
ENG 267 - American Lit: 1940's to 2000

A selection of short novels, essays, short stories, memoirs, poems and films ranging, in this special term, from the 1960s to the present. Authors and directors to be studied include James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Stanley Kubrick, Robert Altman, Maxine Hong Kingston, Philip Roth, Spike Lee, Edward Jones, Denis Johnson, Rachel Kushner and others.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Peltason

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 268
AMST 268/ ENG 268 - American Literature Now

This course will explore the richness and diversity of American (and some Canadian) writing since 2000, focusing primarily on writers who have emerged in the new century.  We’ll read novels and short stories by both established authors, such as Jennifer Egan and Colson Whitehead, and rising talents like Ben Lerner and Jenny Offill.  We’ll also look at the work of some experimental writers, such as Lydia Davis and Percival Everett, and some examples of the genre fiction against which literary writing has defined itself, like Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight, to think about the ways that intellectual and cultural prestige are established in contemporary America.  Given that MFA programs have become a defining feature of the literary landscape in the US, we’ll examine some of the controversies around the spread of these programs through excerpts from recent treatments like Mark McGurl’s The Program Era and Chad Harbach’s MFA vs. NYC.  And we’ll dip into the occasionally bitter rivalries and feuds that have shaped understandings of the contemporary literary scene: Jonathan Franzen vs. Oprah, Franzen vs. Jennifer Weiner, Francine Prose vs. Sadia Shepard.  Studying these conflicts will help illuminate the terrain of literary and cultural values within which contemporary American literature is written, read, and discussed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 268

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Shetley

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 269
AMST 240/ ENG 269 - Rise of an American Empire

An interdisciplinary exploration of the so-called Gilded Age and the Progressive era in the United States between the Civil War and World War I, emphasizing both the conflicts and achievements of the period. Topics will include Reconstruction and African American experience in the South; technological development and industrial expansion; the exploitation of the West and resistance by Native Americans and Latinos; feminism, "New Women," and divorce; tycoons, workers, and the rich-poor divide; immigration from Europe, Asia, and new American overseas possessions; as well as a vibrant period of American art, architecture, literature, music, and material culture, to be studied by means of the rich cultural resources of the Boston area.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 269

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Fisher

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 271
ENG 271 - The Rise of the Novel

Fantasy, romance, “true” crime, experimental absurdity, Gothic-early English fiction originates narrative types that energize the novel throughout its history as literature's most popular form. This course begins with Aphra Behn's New-World slave romance, Oroonoko, and Daniel Defoe's tale of a pickpocket and “whore,” Moll Flanders. Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift has captivated a world readership with its vertiginous mix of fantasy and satire. Henry Fielding laughs at his readers' class and gender anxieties in Joseph Andrews, while Horace Walpole invents a whole new fictional sensibility with the first Gothic novel, The Castle of Otranto. The course concludes with a parody of storytelling itself, Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy, and Frances Burney's Evelina, which anticipates the courtship comedy of Austen and the humorous characterization of Dickens.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Noggle

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 272
ENG 272 - The 19th Century Novel

An exploration of the changing relationships of persons to social worlds in some of the great novels of the nineteenth century. The impact on the novel of imperialism and industrialization, race and inter-ethnic relations both within and outside England, the debate about women's roles, the enfranchisement of the middle and the working classes, the effect on ordinary persons of life in the great cities--these and other themes will be traced in the works of some of the following: Charlotte Brontë, Emily Brontë, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, Thomas Hardy.  

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Meyer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Students interested in receiving Jewish Studies credit for this course should speak to the instructor about focusing their essays on texts by or about Jews

ENG 273
ENG 273 - The Modern British Novel

A consideration of the ways in which modernist writers reimagine the interests of the novel as they experiment with and reshape its traditional subjects and forms. From the frank exploration of sexuality in Lawrence, to the radical subordination of plot in Woolf, modernist writers reconceive our notion of the writer, of story, of the very content of what can be said. A selection of works by E.M. Forster, D.H. Lawrence, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, and Joseph Conrad.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Gonzalez

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 279
AFR 212/ ENG 279 - Black Women Writers

The Black woman writer's efforts to shape images of herself as Black, as women, and as an artist. The problem of literary authority for the Black woman writer, criteria for a Black woman's literary tradition, and the relation of Black feminism or "womanism" to the articulation of a distinctively Black and female literary aesthetic.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 279

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 280
ENG 280 - Poetry of Bidart

A course on the poetry of one of the key figures in American Literature of the past fifty years. Topics include: Bidart as a confessional and post-confessional writer, incorporating the innovations of his mentors, Robert Lowell and Elizabeth Bishop; Bidart as experimental poet, extending the high-Modernist line pioneered by Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams; Bidart as a practitioner of the dramatic monologue as channelled from Shakespeare to Robert Frost; as a regional poet of California and New England; as a poet of queer identity; and, crucially, as a poet of unsurpassed formal and rhetorical inventiveness. We will read Bidart's collected volume, Half-Light: Collected Poems 1965-2016, in its entirety.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Chiasson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 281
AMST 271/ ENG 281 - Amer Drama & Musical Theater

Study of some distinguished twentieth-century American plays, theatre pieces, and musicals. Possible musicals: The Cradle Will Rock, Showboat, West Side Story, A Chorus Line, Into the Woods, Chicago. Possible playwrights and ensembles: Eugene O'Neill, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Lorraine Hansberry, the Bread and Puppet Theatre, the Teatro Campesino, María Irene Fornés, August Wilson, David Henry Hwang, Tony Kushner, Anna Deveare Smith. Focus on close reading, on historical and social context, on realism and the alternatives to realism, on the relations between text and performance. Opportunities both for performance and for critical writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 271

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Rosenwald

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 284
ENG 284 - Ghost Stories

Everyone loves ghost stories, but why? Do we believe in their truth? Do we see ghosts as something that people from other cultures or other times believe? Do we interpret the ghosts as symbols within the literary work? In this course, we will read stories featuring ghosts from across the world and through modern history. We’ll also explore various kinds of literary criticism to see how they can help us become more aware of what we’re doing when we read ghost stories. Stories and plays will include well-known works such as Hamlet, Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw, and Toni Morrison’s Beloved, as well as twentieth-century non-European fiction including the Nigerian writer Amos Tutuola’s The Palm-Wine Drinkard, and South Korean novelist Hwang Sok-Yong’s The Guest. We will read critics such as Elaine Freedgood and Kathleen Brogan, and explore theories about how people read, and how (or whether) literature is supposed to represent existing reality.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Lee

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 286
ENG 286 - The Gay 1990s

Given their slow integration into the social mainstream, queer people have often made do with self-fashioning, a sensibility that identity is a work in progress. Literature and other artistic forms have been integral in sustaining and protecting the stories of queer lives and times. In this course, we will encounter various forms and transformations of queer expression, while focusing on a recent era that saw the dramatic visibility of LGBT folk: the 1990s. But we will not read this period in history in isolation. Instead, we will look backward too, considering early accounts of same-sex longing alongside contemporary representations. The Nineties zeitgeist was self-conscious about the previous “Gay Nineties” (the 1890s) and other queer eras like the Harlem Renaissance. Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Gonzalez

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 289
ENG 289 - London in Literature

London started to become a global, multicultural city in the eighteenth century. How has it changed and how has it remained the same? This course examines how London has been experienced and represented in literary works from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. We will explore how the city has been imagined in terms of disease, crime, power and pleasure. We will consider what types of stories London inspires, and who gets to tells them?. Authors will include Charles Dickens, Arthur Conan Doyle, Virginia Woolf, and Zadie Smith.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Lee

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 290
ENG 290/ JWST 290 - Minorities in U.S. Comics

Comic strips, comic books, and graphic novels have throughout their history in the United States had a complex relationship with members of minority groups, who have often been represented in racist and dehumanizing ways. Meanwhile, though, American Jews played influential roles in the development of the medium, and African-American, Latinx, Asian-American, and LGBTQ artists have more recently found innovative ways to use this medium to tell their stories. In this course, we will survey the history of comics in the U.S., focusing on the problems and opportunities they present for the representation of racial, ethnic, and sexual difference. Comics we may read include Abie the Agent, Krazy Kat, Torchy Brown, Superman, and Love & Rockets, as well as Art Spiegelman’s Maus, Gene Luen Yang’s American Born Chinese, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, and Mira Jacob’s Good Talk.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 290

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Josh Lambert

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 291
ENG 291 - What Is Racial Difference?

Through literary and interdisciplinary methods, this course examines the nature of race. While current debates about race often assume it to be an exclusively modern problem, this course uses classical, medieval, early modern, and modern materials to investigate the long history of race and the means by which thinkers have categorized groups of people and investigated the differences between them through the ages. The course examines the development of race through discourses of linguistic, physical, geographic, and religious difference--from the Tower of Babel to Aristotle, from the Crusades to nineteenth-century racial taxonomies, from Chaucer to Toni Morrison. Considering the roles physical appearance has played in each of these arenas, we will thoughtfully consider the question: What Is Racial Difference? Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Whitaker

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 294
ENG 294 - Writing AIDS

AIDS changed how we live our lives, and this course looks at writings tracing the complex, sweeping ramifications of the biggest sexual-health crisis in world history. This course looks at diverse depictions and genres of H.I.V./AIDS writing, including Pulitzer Prize-winning plays like Angels In America and bestselling popular-science "contagion narratives" like And the Band Played On; independent films like Greg Araki's The Living End and Oscar-winning features and documentaries like Philadelphia, Precious, and How to Survive a Plague. We will read about past controversies and ongoing developments in AIDS history and historiography. These include unyielding stigma and bio-political indifference, met with activism, service, and advocacy; transforming biomedical research to increase access to better treatments, revolutionizing AIDS from death sentence to chronic condition; proliferating "moral panics" about public sex, "barebacking," and "PrEP" (pre-exposure prevention), invoking problematic constructs like "Patient Zero," "being on the Down Low," "party and play" subculture, and the "Truvada whore"; and constructing a global bio-political apparatus ("AIDS Inc.") to control and protect populations. We will look at journal articles, scholarly and popular-science books (excerpts), as well as literary and cinematic texts. Also some archival materials from ACT UP Boston, the activist group.

*Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement.*

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Gonzalez

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 295
AFR 295/ ENG 295 - Harlem Renaissance

This is an exploration of the Harlem Renaissance, a movement of African American literature and culture of the early twentieth century, which encompassed all major art forms, including poetry, fiction, and drama, as well as music, the visual arts, cabaret, and political commentary. This movement corresponds with the publication of The New Negro anthology (1925). Literary authors we will study may include Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Wallace Thurman, and Richard Bruce Nugent. We will also enter into contemporary debates about “the color line” in this period of American history, reading some earlier work by W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, or James Weldon Johnson, in the context of early Jim Crow, the Great Migration, the Jazz Age, and transatlantic Modernism. Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement. Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 295

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Gonzalez

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 296
AMST 296/ ENG 296 - Immigration & Diaspora

This course explores the exciting new literature produced by writers transplanted to the United States or by children of recent immigrants. We’ll consider how the perspectives of immigrants redefine what is American by sustaining linkages across national borders, and we’ll examine issues of hybrid identity and multiple allegiances, collective memory, traumatic history, nation, home and homeland, and globalization. Our course materials include novels, essays, memoirs, short fiction, and visual art. We’ll be looking at writers in the United States with cultural connections to India, Pakistan, Viet Nam, Bosnia, Egypt, Ethiopia, Korea, Japan, and Mexico. Some authors to be included: André Aciman, Catherine Chung, Sandra Cisneros, Mohsin Hamid, Aleksandar Hemon, Jumpa Lahiri, Lê Thi Diem Thúy, Dinaw Mengestu, and Julie Otsuka. Artists include Surendra Lawoti, Priya Kambli, Asma Ahmed Shikoh, and the African American mixed-media artist Radcliffe Bailey.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 296

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Brogan

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 297
AMST 281/ ENG 297 - Rainbow Republic: Am Culture

Transgender rights, gay marriage, and Hollywood and sports figures' media advocacy are only the latest manifestations of the rich queer history of the United States. This course will explore American LGBTQ history and culture from the late nineteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on consequential developments in society, politics, and consciousness since Stonewall in 1969. The course will introduce some elements of gender and queer theory; it will address historical and present-day constructions of sexuality through selected historical readings but primarily through the vibrant cultural forms produced by queer artists and communities. The course will survey significant queer literature, art, film, and popular culture, with an emphasis on the inventive new forms of recent decades. It will also emphasize the rich diversity of queer culture especially through the intersectionality of gender and sexuality with class, ethnicity and race.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 297

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Fisher

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 299
AMST 299/ ENG 299 - Horror Films in America

An exploration of the horror film in America, from 1960 to the present, with particular attention to the ways that imaginary monsters embody real terrors, and the impact of social and technological change on the stories through which we provoke and assuage our fears. We'll study classics of the genre, such as *Psycho*, *Rosemary’s Baby*, and *The Exorcist*, as well as contemporary films like *Get Out* and *Midsommar*, and read some of the most important work in the rich tradition of critical and theoretical
writing on horror.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 299

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 301
ENG 301 - Advanced Fiction Workshop

A workshop in the techniques of fiction writing together with practice in critical evaluation of student work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ENG 203 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Cezair-Thompson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Students who have taken this course once may earn credit for it one additional time. Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 302
ENG 302 - Advanced Writing/Poetry

A workshop in intensive practice in the writing of poetry. Students who have taken this course once may register for it one additional time.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ENG 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Bidart

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit. Students who have taken this course once may earn credit for it one additional time.

ENG 308
CAMS 308/ ENG 308 - Advanced Writing for TV

In Advanced Writing for Television, we’ll pick up where Writing for Television left off. Students will continue to practice the skills of writing teleplays—character and story development; structure and arc; tension and conflict; audience, premise, and tone; scenes, description, action, and dialogue; and voice and clarity. We’ll start by studying a range of TV shows: comedies, dramas, web series, and others. Through reading scripts, watching shows, and discussing both in class, students will develop a more advanced and specific understanding of what makes a show work. Through their own writing, students will practice applying the lessons they’ve learned. In the workshop process, we’ll discuss everything that comes up in students’ scripts—what’s working, what’s not, and what we can all learn about TV writing from each example.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 30 8

Prerequisites: ENG 208/CAMS 208

Instructor: Lauren Holmes

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 311
ENG 311/ MER 311 - Women in Medieval Literature

This course surveys medieval texts written by and about women across medieval England, Europe, and the premodern world. We will look at the medieval world through women’s eyes. How did text written by and about women represent gender and sexuality? How did they address the problem of women’s self-definition in a culture in prestige and creativity that was commonly shaped around masculinity? We will explore key genres such as love poetry, satire, romance, and devotional literature. Authors to be studied will include Marie de France, Christine de Pizan, Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: MER 311

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

Instructor: Laura Ingallinella

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 314
ENG 314/ MER 314 - The Global Middle Ages

This course surveys literary artifacts from the Middle Ages, focusing primarily on case studies that exemplify how medieval men and women constructed, endorsed, or revolutionized their perception of the world. We will explore key genres such as epic poetry, history writing, religious texts, travelogues, lyric, romance, narrative fiction, and theater. For each genre, we will discuss texts written or translated in medieval England side by side with counterparts originating in Africa, and Asia, and Europe. Topics include the Song of Roland, John Mandeville’s Travels, Barlaam and Iosaphat, the Letter of Prester John, and The Thousand and One Nights.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: MER 314

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Ingallinella

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 316
ENG 316 - CSPW: Public Writing on Poetry

This Calderwood seminar in public writing will show that there is no such thing as dead poetry. In a series of weekly writing and editing exercises ranging from movie reviews to op-eds, we will explore the many ways that the great poetry of centuries past speaks directly to modern experience. We will be taught both by the poets themselves (whose eloquence will rub off on us) and each other, as each student will pick a poet whose writing she will become expert at relaying to a lay audience. By the end of the semester, not only will you be able to persuade a newspaper reader that blank verse matters as much as Twitter; you will also learn how to articulate the value of your English major to a prospective employer--and how to transmit your excitement about the latest discoveries in your field to friends and parents.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken at least two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Lynch

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 317
ENG 317 - Medieval Romance & Pol of Race

This course takes its title from Duby’s magisterial history The Knight, the Lady, and the Priest, which studies medieval marriage and its implications for marriage and gender relations in modernity. We will build on Duby’s work by considering how medieval romance literature has constructed not only marriage but also race. We will read medieval romances that depict religious differences as physical differences, especially skin color, and we will consider texts in the theological, philosophical, and historical contexts that informed their creation and reception. We will also consider the afterlives of medieval romance in modern love stories that are concerned with race. We will inquire, what do blackness and whiteness mean in chivalric literature and the history of love? And is modern race actually medieval?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Whitaker

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 324
ENG 324 - Adv Studies in Shakespeare

Topic for 2020-2021: Shakespeare in Performance Around the Globe

Topic for 2020-2021: Shakespeare in Performance Around the Globe

The globalization of Shakespeare has only accelerated in the past quarter century, generating a trove of new stage productions, films and adaptations that continue to re-imagine, challenge and revitalize Shakespeare. This course will explore some of the more striking examples, in both English and other languages, from a Korean stage version of A Midsummer Night's Dream and a Chinese film adaptation of Hamlet (The Banquet) to Spanish and Indian retellings of Othello. In the process, we will also investigate what concepts like authenticity, translation, and adaptation mean in an intercultural context. The reading list will be finalized at a later date so that local productions can be considered, but will most likely include: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, Othello, Macbeth and King Lear.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Ko

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This is a topics course and can be taken more than once for credit as long as the topic is different each time.

ENG 325
ENG 325 - Adv Studies 16th&17th Cent Lit

This changing-topics course provides opportunity to pursue special interests in the study of major writers and ideas in 16th and 17th century literature.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This is a topics course and can be taken more than once for credit as long as the topic is different each time.

ENG 335
ENG 335 - Adv Studies in 18th Cent. Lit

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This is a topics course and can be taken more than once for credit as long as the topic is different each time.

ENG 336
ENG 336 - Jane Austen & Novels of Her Time

This course reads Jane Austen alongside other women writers of her time, and examines her novels in the context of wartime. These wars took place not only on battlefields but in British culture, particularly concerning the importance of authority and the necessity of obedience. Could the role of women in society be reimagined? Other authors will include Frances Burney, Maria Edgeworth, and Mary Hays. Sense and Sensibility, Mansfield Park, Persuasion, and Emma will help us to grasp how Austen shapes a mode of representation responsive to her time.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Lee

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 341
ENG 341 - Siblings in Romantic Lit

How do siblings, sibling relationships, and conceptions of brotherhood and sisterhood figure in Romantic-period authorship and texts? What is particularly Romantic about sisters and brothers? We'll consider such questions from several different angles, looking, for example, at the following: representations of siblings in literary texts; sister-brother writers (but also the importance of non-writing siblings); the relation of genius to genes; the complications of step-siblings, half-siblings, and siblings-in-law; the overlap or conflict of sibling relationships with friendship, marriage, romantic love, and self-love; and brotherhood as metaphor (revolutionary, abolitionist, Christian). Texts: poems, and some prose, by William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Coleridge, Charles and Mary Lamb, DeQuincey, Byron, Austen (Sense and Sensibility), M. Shelley (Frankenstein), P. Shelley, Keats.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Hickey

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 342
ENG 342 - Love, Sex, Romantic Poetry

Study of Romantic poems (and some prose), focusing on the role of eros in Romantic conceptions of imagination. Passion, sympathy, sensibility; the lover as Romantic subject; gendering the sublime and the beautiful; sexual/textual ambiguity; gender and genius; the sublime potential of unutterable or unspeakable love; the beloved as muse; enchantresses and demon lovers as figures of imagination; the attractions, dangers, excesses, and failures of idealizing erotic imagination (sentimentalism, narcissism, solipsism, disenchantment); desire as Romantic quest; sexual politics; marriage (and its discontents); non-normative or transgressive sex (free love, homosexuality, incest, hypersexuality, adultery); (homo)erotics of Romantic literary friendship, rivalry, and collaboration. Texts by Coleridge, the Wordsworths, Hazlitt, Mary Robinson, 'Sapphic' poets, Byron, Caroline Lamb, Felicia Hemans, Shelley, Keats, John Clare.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Alison Hickey

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 345
ENG 345 - Adv Studies in 19th cent. Lit

Spring 2021: John Keats. Lines of Influence from Homer to Gaiman

The subject of this course is Keats and the lines of influence that connect him to his literary predecessors, contemporaries, and successors. We’ll focus on the poet’s life and works, from his youthful poetic experiments to the famous odes; from sonnets and brief lyrics to romances and fragments of
grand works left unfinished on his death. Reading Keats’s letters alongside his poetry, we’ll trace the influence of Homer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, and Wordsworth; examine connections to Shelley and other contemporaries; and explore the poet’s own influence on such diverse successors as Tennyson, Hopkins, Dickinson, Whitman, Hardy, Wilfred Owen, Wallace Stevens, Countee Cullen, James Merrill, Philip Levine, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland, Philip Pullman, Jorie Graham, and Neil Gaiman.

Note: Percentages are difficult to calculate, but my best guess is that we’ll devote about 75% of class time to Keats “himself” and about 25% to other writers. Over the course of the term, every student will read all of Keats’s major poems, many of his letters, and pertinent selections from “among the English poets” (and other English language writers) mentioned above. Student work may focus on Keats alone or on Keats and another writer.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Tim Peltason

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This is a topics course and can be taken more than once for credit as long as the topic is different each time.

ENG 346
ENG 346 - George Eliot & Her Readers

In August 1872, Benjamin Jowett (the head of Oxford's Balliol College and one of the century's most eminent scholars) wrote George Eliot a fan letter. In it, Jowett not only identified Middlemarch, the novel Eliot published earlier that year, as her “great work,” but also reported that “It is a bond of conversation and friendship everywhere.” And so it has been ever since. In this course, we will explore the great novels of the greatest novelist of the Victorian period. In addition to reading Eliot's novels, we will take up critical responses to them, beginning with those of Eliot's contemporaries. In particular, we will consider readers' objections to her representations of religion, female autonomy, and sexuality. As we ourselves become part of Eliot's readership, we will think about her development as a novelist and critic who reimagined the novel as central to the moral and intellectual lives of the reading public. Eliot wanted her novels to make a deep and lasting impression on her readers, as indeed they do. Novels will include Scenes of Clerical Life, Adam Bede, The Mill on the Floss, The Lifted Veil, Middlemarch, and Daniel Deronda.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students. Not open to students who have taken this class as a topic of ENG 345.

Instructor: Rodensky

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 347
ENG 347 - 19th Century Novels

“Reader, I married him,” Jane Eyre tells us as her novel draws to a close. Many nineteenth-century novels end with a marriage. So despite suggestions within the body of the novel that women's traditional role is not a satisfying one, the heroine often seems contented in that role by the novel's end. But what happens if the heroine chooses wrongly? In this course, we will consider novels that look at a heroine's life after a marriage that she comes to regret, as well as some novels in which the bad romantic choices do not result in marriage. What do these novels of romantic mistake have to say about women's lives? Probable authors: Anne Brontë, Charlotte Brontë, James, Austen, Eliot.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken at least two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Meyer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 349
ENG 349 - George Eliot's Novels

George Eliot believed that art could teach us how to be better people, and she wrote novels that she hoped would make a difference in the world. That’s Wellesley’s mission too. In this course, we’ll read five of Eliot’s seven major works (Scenes of Clerical Life, Adam Bede, Mill on the Floss, Middlemarch, Daniel Deronda) and consider the “difference” Eliot wanted to make in her readers and their communities. We will explore not only the novels themselves but also their contemporary reviews as well as Eliot’s letters and essays. In addition, we will take up the wider questions that Eliot raises about the force and function of literature and examine recent essays about how and whether fiction changes its readers.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 350
ENG 350 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ENG 350H
ENG 350H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ENG 351
ENG 351 - The Robert Garis Seminar

An advanced, intensive writing workshop, open to six students, named for a late Wellesley professor who valued good writing. This is a class in writing non-fiction prose, the kind that might someday land a writer in The New Yorker or The Atlantic. Our genre is often called "literary journalism," and here the special skills -- technical precision, ability for physical description, and psychological insight -- necessary for writing fiction are applied to real-life events and personalities. We will read and emulate authors like Joan Didion, Hilton Als, Janet Malcolm, Robert Mcfarlane, and Terry Castle, and each student will produce a 5,000 word-piece of her own.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 6

Prerequisites: Open to qualified students by permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 356
ENG 356 - Ernest Hemingway

This course will survey Hemingway's literary career: his novels, including The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea; his journalism; and his brilliant short stories from In Our Time and other collections. We will give special attention to the young Hemingway, who survived serious wounds in World War I and who worked hard to establish himself as a writer in the 1920s when he was living in Paris with his wife and child-a period that Hemingway evocatively recalls in his memoir, A Moveable Feast. Our goals will be to understand his extraordinary style-its complexity, emotional power, and depth-and his charismatic personality as it is displayed in both his life and his writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Cain

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 357
ENG 357 - World of Dickinson

The poems and letters of Emily Dickinson, arguably the most important American poet of the nineteenth century, provide a window into one of the most thrilling and idiosyncratic minds in literature. Dickinson lived her entire adult life in her family's elegant home on the main street of Amherst, Massachusetts, writing in her spacious bedroom through the night. The house and its views, as well as its gardens and paths, are all vivid presences in her work. Dickinson hand-wrote all of her poems on paper she scavenged around the house; scholars are still debating how to read and interpret her hand-done poems. To study Dickinson is to be confronted with questions that seem sometimes more forensic than literary critical. We will explore Dickinson's online archives and visit, several times, her house and gardens in Amherst. This course should appeal not only to lovers of poetry but to lovers of old houses, scrapbooks, ghost stories, and the material history of the New England region.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Chiasson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Wendy Judge Paulson '69 Ecology of Place Living Laboratory course.

ENG 358
ENG 358 - Sapphic Modernism

This seminar focuses on the rich and strange archive of modern lesbian literature of the twentieth century. We begin with the “mother” of Sapphic Modernism, Sappho herself, and continue through the Interwar Era with the High Modernism of Virginia Woolf, the Black Modernism of Nella Larsen, the Parisian “Lost Generation” of Gertrude Stein, and the Late Modernism of Djuna Barnes. After an interlude during the Second World War, with the poetry of H.D. (Hilda Doolittle), we turn to the 1950s and the beginning of the so-called American Century, with the postwar pulp and noir writings of Ann Bannon and Patricia Highsmith. We continue into the 1960s, with the “toward Stonewall” lesbian novel Desert of the Heart by Jane Rule, and end with Adrienne Rich in the post–“Stonewall” Era.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Gonzalez

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 360
ENG 360 - Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ENG 370
ENG 370 - Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ENG 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ENG 381
ENG 381 - Literature, Truth, Reality

Why do we distinguish between fiction and non-fiction? Should literature reflect reality, criticize it, or imagine it otherwise? Do its representations shape our experiences in helpful or misleading ways? This course will examine how different theorists have condemned literature, tried to defend it, or explained its relation to reality. We will read a wide range of critics ranging from Plato and Aristotle to important twentieth-century theorists including Auerbach, Adorno, Foucault, and Jacques Rancière.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Lee

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 382
ENG 382 - Literary Theory

A survey of major developments in literary theory and criticism. Discussion will focus on important perspectives-including structuralism, post-structuralism, Marxism, and feminism-and crucial individual theorists-including Bakhtin, Empson, Barthes, Derrida, Foucault, Jameson, Sedgwick, and Zizek.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Shetley

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 383
AMST 383/ ENG 383 - Women in Love: Am Lit & Art

Study in depth of two important, challenging American novels: The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James and Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser. Detailed consideration of biographical, historical, and social contexts. Also: film adaptations; works of art by John Singer Sargent, Thomas Eakins, and Georgia O'Keefe; and photographs by Alfred Stieglitz.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 383

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Cain

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 387
ENG 387 - Authors

Topic for 2020-2021: The Poetry of James Merrill


Topic for 2020-2021: Edith Wharton and Willa Cather

Topic for 2020-2021: The Poetry of James Merrill

A study of the poet's work, from his early lyrics to his mature, epic masterpiece, written in consultation with a Ouija board, "The Changing Light at Sandover." Topics include: modern and postmodern forms; gregariousness and lyric compression; poems of travel; poems of queer domesticity; the occult and its influence upon Merrill and some important predecessors, including William Butler Yeats.

Topic for 2020-2021: Edith Wharton and Willa Cather

A study of the fiction of these two very different American women novelists of the early twentieth century. One is best known as the chronicler of life in aristocratic "old New York," the other as the novelist of life on the Nebraska prairie. Yet a number of similar issues arise in both novelists' work: the nature of female sexuality, the problems of marriage, relationships between generations, the nature of the immigrant and the ethnic "other," tensions between the American West and the East and between rural and urban life, the place of art in American culture. Above all, both novelists are preoccupied with the vexed question of the destiny of America.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Chiasson (Fall), Meyer (Spring)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course. This is a topics course and can be taken more than once for credit as long as the topic is different each time.

ENG 388
ENG 388/ PEAC 388 - Trauma, Conflict & Narrative

This team-taught course explores the role of narratives in response to mass trauma, focusing on regions of Africa and African Diaspora societies. Drawing on the emerging fields of trauma narrative and conflict resolution, we will examine the effectiveness of oral, written and cinematic narratives in overcoming legacies of suffering and building peace. Topics include: violence in colonial and postcolonial Central Africa, the Biafran war, South Africa during and after Apartheid and Rwanda’s 1994 genocide. We will also explore the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its impact on African-American and Caribbean societies. Types of narrative include novels, memoirs, films, plays, and data from truth and reconciliation commissions. Students will be exposed to trauma narrative not only as text but as a social and political instrument for post-conflict reconstruction.

This course may serve as a capstone seminar for Peace and Justice majors and minors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 388

Prerequisites: PEAC 104 for PEAC Majors

Instructor: Confortini, Cezair-Thompson (English)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: PEAC Seniors get priority

ENG 390
ENG 390 - CSPW: New York Review

This is a course on the art of the book review. The course is tied to the fiftieth anniversary, in 2013, of The New York Review of Books. We will study The New York Review and what has been written about its history; we will read in the digital archive of the Review and write our own reviews in its prevailing moods and styles. This remarkable periodical has been at the center of intellectual life in America over the past 50 years; in seeing what made, and makes, it “tick,” we will discover the changing nature and function of great reviewing in a changing America.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: By permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Chiasson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 399H
ENG 399H/ PHIL 399H - Race, Justice, and Action

Race and racism have occasioned movements for justice and calls to action globally, now and in the recent as well as distant pasts. In this experience-forward, Albright Global Challenge course, students are asked to, first, become more familiar with conversations and ongoing work about race and justice in their communities, and second, develop a project wherein they work to initiate, enhance, or otherwise engage in those conversations and in that work. This course is offered remotely, which means that we anticipate a virtual classroom composed of students from different communities within the US as well as around the world. Each week, students will read short texts related to a theme that may frame their independent community-based project. Themes include: history, education, health, policing, organizing, and technology. 

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 399H

Prerequisites: Any course at Wellesley College that critically engages with questions of race and/or justice. Students will be asked to submit a short explanation of their interest in the class and list their relevant course experience before being admitted into the class.

Instructor: Julie Walsh, Cord Whitaker

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: