EDUC 103Y
EDUC 103Y/ WGST 102Y - FYS: Lessons of Childhood

From Disney films to Nickelodeon cartoons to Newberry award-winning texts, popular children's media offers us the opportunity to analyze how complex issues of identity are represented in cultural productions aimed at a young audience. This course takes as a site of analysis media aimed at children to investigate the lessons imparted and ideologies circulate in popular films and books. How is class drawn in Lady and the Tramp? What are politics of language at play in Moana? What are the sounds of masculinity in Beauty and the Beast? How does Mulan construct gender, race, and militarism? Using an intersectional frame of analysis, we will trace popular tropes, identify images of resistance, and map out the more popular messages children receive about difference in our world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 10 3Y

Prerequisites: None. Open to First-Years only.

Instructor: Mata

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course. Registration in this section is restricted to students selected for the Wellesley Plus Program. Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

EDUC 200
EDUC 200 - Early Childhood Education

Starting with a broad, historical overview of child development and developmental theories, we will connect ideas about children's learning with teaching practices and current perspectives on early childhood education. We will focus on recognizing changing needs and developmental differences in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers as they grow in all skill areas-motor, cognitive, social emotional, and language and communication. Through readings, observations, writing assignments, and reflective discussion, students will learn to integrate developmental understanding and appropriate curriculum planning in an Early Childhood setting.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Morgan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Meets one of the course requirements toward Department of Education and Care Teacher Certification.

EDUC 201
EDUC 201 - Young Children w/ Spec. Needs

We will study characteristics of young children with disabilities and examine supportive programs, practices, and services. We will focus on theoretical and applied knowledge about disabilities, including communication disorders, sensory impairments, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders, autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, giftedness, and physical and health related disabilities. We will discuss screening, assessment, early intervention, individualized education programs, inclusive education, community resources, family issues, and the requirements of various state and federal laws that impact children and students with disabilities. Students will learn how programs make accommodations, structure modifications, and differentiate instruction based on young children's needs.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Some coursework in child development or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Morgan

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

EDUC 206
AMST 206/ EDUC 206 - Prison Ed in the U.S.

In this class, we will look at several forms of “school” that have historically emerged behind the walls of U.S. prisons. These have included formal university-funded humanities education, trade training, high school and high school equivalency classes and, most importantly, self-organized political education and study groups. Moments of the latter have caused some political and politicized prisoners to refer to prisons as “universities of revolution.” In today’s prison abolitionist movement, inside-outside study groups serve as social hubs, political workshops and cultural anchors. By looking closely at how imprisoned people and their supporters both organize and navigate institutional education programs, we will build a historical and theoretical overview of prison education, with important insights for understanding both prisons and education in general.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 20 6

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Alexander

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 207
EDUC 207/ PEAC 207/ SOC 207 - Schools and Society

Does education in the United States encourage social mobility or help to reproduce the socioeconomic hierarchy? What is the hidden curriculum—the ideas, values, and skills that students learn at school that are not in the textbook? Who determines what gets taught in school? How do schools in the US compare to school systems in other countries?  What makes school reform so hard to do?

Questions like these drive this course. It offers students an introduction to the sociology of education by broadly exploring the role of education in American society. The course covers key sociological perspectives on education, including conflict theory, functionalism, and human and cultural capital. Other topics include schools and communities; the role of teachers, students, parents, mentors, and peers in educational inequalities (including tracking and measures of achievement), school violence, school reform, and knowledge production. We also look comparatively at education systems across the world.
 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 20 7,EDUC 20 7

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Levitt

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 213
EDUC 213 - Social & Emotional Learning & Dev

This course engages students in a series of explorations that illuminate the field of social and emotional learning, which is fast becoming one of the most exciting areas of teaching and learning in U.S. schools. Students explore how social, emotional, and academic learning can be interwoven with what we understand about child and youth development, and how these ideas can inform the pedagogy and practices of caring in schools. Students also uncover how social and emotional learning is bound together with the struggle for civic participation and issues around structural oppression. Making use of a great variety of sources from articles to podcasts, novels, and films, students debate the critical role educators play in the development of emotional intelligence and resilience in K-12 students. Through their engagement with many different activities and learning structures, students make the connection between social-emotional skills and school climate, and explore the distinguishing features of positive cognitive, social, and emotional development at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Students debate historic and contemporary cases of evidence-based social-emotional practices and programs in a range of urban and suburban schools. Students also have multiple opportunities to explore their own social emotional educations and design their own initiatives to act on their learning.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Rubin

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Summer

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Summer 2020 is the last term this course will be taught. The course will become a 300-level seminar.

EDUC 214
EDUC 214 - Youth, Family and Community

School-age children and youth are often understood through the complex lives they lead in schools--academic achievers, behavioral misfits, and rebellious adolescents. Beyond the routine analyses of behavior, test scores and curriculum, what else can the lives of youth tell us about educational change? This course seeks to explore education by looking outside of schools: What are the experiences of students’ families and how does family life shape definitions of success? How do relationships with peers influence motivation in school? How do historical, political, social and cultural contexts shape interactions with formal schooling? Through an exploration of research, memoir, children’s literature and film, this course seeks to understand children and youth through their complex relationships and encounters within families, peer groups and community institutions, all the while interrogating the ways schools can integrate the holistic lived experiences of children and youth into theories of educational change.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 215
EDUC 215/ PEAC 215 - Understanding & Improving Schools

In this course students will engage with a spectrum of historic and contemporary school reform efforts across different contexts in the United States. Making use of a diverse array of texts from articles to podcasts and videos, students will struggle with both the promise of education as a tool for remedying inequalities and the stubborn reality that too often schools reflect and reproduce injustice. The structure of the course session and activities prompts students to learn about and experience alternative educational possibilities. Working in groups, pairs, and as individuals, students will explore scholarship and cases in educational anthropology, sociology, history, and critical theory, while questioning the purposes, processes, and products of schooling. Central to the course is the community students create with the instructor for mutual learning support and debate. All members of the course are engaged in a learning stance that centers a discipline of hope and engages with the proposition that communities can organize their own struggle to define and demand a humanizing and liberatory education. Students also have multiple opportunities to explore their own educational experiences and design their own research or educational initiatives to act on their learning.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 22

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 215

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Intended for First-Years and Sophomores, and Juniors/Seniors fulfilling major or minor requirements.

Instructor: Vasudevan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

EDUC 216
EDUC 216 - Education and Social Policy

This course is an examination of education policy in the 20th and 21st century and the social, political, and economic forces that have shaped these policies over the years. We will analyze the different-and sometimes conflicting-goals, motivations, and outcomes of educational policies at the national, local, and school level. Central questions to this course are: who designs educational policy and for whom? Whose interests are served and whose interests are unmet? Using an interdisciplinary approach and case exploration, we examine the ways education policies and practices have responded to or been shaped by social issues such as immigration, poverty, racism and urban development. We will integrate theoretical and conceptual learning with an understanding of cases through both group and individual analysis. In doing so, students will develop critical skills of policy analysis that can allow them to better understand current trends and develop alternative solutions to questions of educational dilemmas and practices.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 22

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Intended for Firstyears and Sophomores, and Juniors/Seniors fulfilling major or minor requirements.

Instructor: Vasudevan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

EDUC 217
EDUC 217/ WGST 217 - Growing Up Gendered

This course focuses on childhood and the teen years in the United States. How is gender socially constructed in childhood and adolescence? What are the experiences of children and teens in families, schools, and peer groups that contribute to that process? What is the relationship between pop culture and the gendered lives of children and teens? How does gendering vary by race/ethnicity and social class? We will explore the core issues in the field, including the importance of including the voices of children and teens, the ways in which gender is constructed in social interactions, and the intersections of gender, sexuality and peer status.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 217

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

EDUC 226
ECON 226/ EDUC 226 - Economics of Education Policy

Uses a microeconomic framework to analyze important questions in education policy about school finance, organization, efficiency, and equity. Is education a private good? What are the costs and benefits of expanded education for individuals, communities, and countries? What are the consequences of more widespread early childhood education and college attendance? What is the role of teachers, peers, and families in education? Does school choice promote student achievement? Applies concepts such as comparative statics, subsidies, externalities, perfect and imperfect competition, cost-benefit analysis, and welfare analysis to these and other questions. Each semester includes one or two policy discussions on contemporary issues in education.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 226

Prerequisites: ECON 101. ECON 102 and ECON 103 recommended.

Instructor: Werkema

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 227
AFR 227/ EDUC 227 - Black Girlhood

This course is designed to examine interdisciplinary theories, methods, and analytical approaches to define and study of Black girlhood. We will explore Black girlhood as a developmental period, a public and private performance, and a source of identity and agency. Students will discuss the duality of Black girlhood, risk versus resilience, to understand how Black girlhood is enacted and evaluated in families, schools, communities, mass media, and the larger society. The cultural, social, psychological, and political constructions of Black girlhood in the U.S. context will be interrogated by analyzing academic texts, film, media, poetry, novels, art, and music focused on Black girls.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 227

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Lindsay-Dennis

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

EDUC 250
EDUC 250 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 5

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

EDUC 250H
EDUC 250H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 3

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

EDUC 299H
EDUC 299H - Ed Practicum in Youth Dev

This half-unit course course aims to engage students in the practice of bridging their field-based experience in an afterschool program with research and theory on community-based educational spaces and youth development. To take this class, students must be volunteering or working in an afterschool or youth program setting 3-4 hours per week throughout the semester. Students will begin the first half of the semester with 3 seminar-style group supervision meetings (set for 2/6, 2/13, and 2/20). In these seminars, students will share puzzles of practice from their afterschool settings, connecting their experiences to a discussion about assigned readings. Throughout the semester, student will write reflective journal entries guided by prompts. On a final presentation day (tentatively set for May 7), students will present findings from their inquiry into their field-based experience –– on topics such as their experience of relationship-building with youth within a program, their learning about a new community, youth population, or afterschool activity, or exploration of a key dilemma of practice that emerged from their volunteer experience.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Vasudevan

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This class is designed for students who are already working and/or plan to work at an afterschool program or youth program for the duration of the Spring semester. Students who are volunteering or working in a program through Wellesley's Civic Engagement partnerships are encouraged to take this course. Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

EDUC 300
EDUC 300 - Teaching & Curriculum Mid & High School

This seminar engages students with the work of curriculum development and teaching in middle and high school classrooms, joined with discussion of important contemporary issues in education.  We will focus especially on classrooms as learning environments and on teacher understanding of student academic, social, and emotional development. Additional laboratory periods for teaching presentations and an accompanying field placement are required.  This course is designed for seniors in the Wellesley Secondary Teacher Education Program, and for others who do not plan to complete teacher training at Wellesley, but who want to teach after graduation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One of EDUC 102, EDUC 117, EDUC 212, EDUC 213, EDUC 214, EDUC 215, EDUC 216, PSYC 248, PSYC 321, or MIT 11.124, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hawes, Rubin

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Open to all students, mandatory for those seeking middle school or high school certification; students should contact the instructor either before or soon after registration to plan their field placement.

EDUC 303
EDUC 303 - Pract: Curriculum & Supv Teaching

This course is supervised student teaching, and curriculum development in students' teaching fields throughout the semester. Attendance at an appropriate school placement is required, with regular observations and conferencing. Students interested in working with middle or high school students should enroll in section EDUC 303-01; students interested in working with elementary or preschool students should enroll in section EDUC 303-02.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Students seeking teacher certification must apply to the department for admission to this course in the semester before it is taken; other students should contact the instructor either before or soon after registration to plan their field placement.

Instructor: Rubin, Tutin

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Open to students seeking substantial observation and teaching experience in a school, mandatory for students seeking teacher certification. Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

EDUC 304
EDUC 304 - Curric & Instr Elementary Educ

In this seminar taught by a team of expert teachers and guided by experienced faculty, students will engage with the work of curriculum development, planning instruction, and assessment in elementary school classrooms through investigations on various topics highly relevant to current teaching practices. Recent studies have included: Methods for Ethnic Studies with children, Social Justice and Antiracist Pedagogy, Science across elementary grades, Classroom Community building, Trauma Informed practice, Design Thinking, Museum Education, Family/School Connections, and the Reading/Writing Connection. Additional laboratory periods for the presentations of lessons engage students in practice teaching and a limited accompanying field placement are required. Remote options will be offered as necessary should COVID interfere. This course is designed for seniors in the Wellesley Elementary Teacher Scholars Program and other juniors and seniors who do not plan to complete teacher training at Wellesley, but want to teach after graduation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Pre/Co-requisite - EDUC 310 or EDUC 314 or by permission of the instructor. Open to all Juniors and Seniors. It is recommended that students who take this course have at least one previous education course. Students should contact Professor Noah Rubin and/or Professor Diane Tutin for registration permission and to plan a field placement.

Instructor: Rubin, Tutin

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory only for Seniors seeking elementary education certification through the Wellesley Elementary Scholars Program.

EDUC 305
EDUC 305 - Curriculum, Instruction & Special Needs

This seminar is taught by a team of expert teachers and guided by experienced faculty, A continuation of EDUC 304, this course engages students in curriculum materials and instructional methods used in elementary school classrooms. Students will learn about Relationship Building and Classroom Management, Special Needs and Disability, Family/School Connections, Social Studies, English Learners and Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies, and Classroom Design. An accompanying field placement is required. This course is designed for seniors in the Wellesley Elementary Teacher Education Program and other juniors and seniors who do not plan to complete teacher training at Wellesley, but want to teach after graduation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: EDUC 304 or by permission of the instructor. Open to Juniors, Seniors and post-baccalaureate students. It is recommended that students who take this course have at least one previous education course. Students should contact Professor Noah Rubin and/or Professor Diane Tutin for registration permission and to plan a field placement.

Instructor: Rubin, Tutin

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory only for Seniors seeking elementary education certification through the Wellesley Elementary Program.

EDUC 308
EDUC 308/ SOC 308 - Seminar: Children in Society

This seminar will focus upon children and youth as both objects and subjects within societies. Beginning with consideration of the social construction of childhood, the course will examine the images, ideas, and expectations that constitute childhoods in various historical and cultural contexts. We will also consider the roles of children as social actors who contribute to and construct social worlds of their own. Specific topics to be covered include the historical development of childhood as a distinct phase of life, children's peer cultures, children and work, children's use of public spaces, children's intersectional experiences of inequality, and the effects of consumer culture upon children. Considerable attention will be given to the dynamics of the social institutions most directly affecting childhood today: the family, education, and the state.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 30 8

Prerequisites: Open to Juniors and Seniors with one 100- or 200-level sociology course, or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Rutherford

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course

EDUC 310
EDUC 310 - Sem: Child Literacy & Reading

Students will examine how children acquire reading, writing, listening, and oral language skills, and how this relates to cognition, with a focus on current research and practice in literacy development for elementary-age children. Oral language and reading processes, assessment using a variety of techniques, phonics, and comprehension strategies are addressed and lessons are constructed. Integrated throughout this learning is an exploration of culturally diverse and relevant children's literature. Teaching strategies that address the needs of a diverse population of learners, including at-risk students, English Language Learners, and students with special needs will be studied. A weekly 1.5-hour field placement experience at a nearby elementary school is required. An online option will be available if COVID protocols interfere. This course is structured to support students pursuing elementary education certification, but is open to all students and also highly applicable to students considering teaching abroad or in urban schools. Offered during the spring semester and required for elementary teaching certification, it is strongly recommended that the course be completed before student teaching begins.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to students who have taken at least one education course or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Tutin

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

EDUC 313
EDUC 313 - Social Emotional & Development

This seminar engages students in a series of explorations that illuminate the field of Social and Emotional Learning (SEL), which is fast becoming one of the most exciting areas of teaching and learning in U.S. schools. Students explore how social, emotional, and academic learning can be interwoven with what we understand about child and youth development, and how these ideas can inform pedagogy (teaching) in k-12 settings. Students also uncover how social and emotional learning is bound together with struggles for civic participation, social justice, and efforts to dismantle structural oppression in a range of educational sites and in society. Through many different activities and learning structures the course provides students with multiple opportunities to explore their own social emotional educations and participate in the creation of new ways to engage young people and adults in joyful learning, celebrating identities, emotional and physical thriving, and justice.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One 200 level education course or permission of instructor. Not open to students who have taken EDUC 213.

Instructor: Rubin

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 314
EDUC 314 - Learning & Teaching Mathematics

Students in this course will strengthen their own understanding of the principles and concepts underlying fundamental mathematical content, specifically number and operations, functions and algebra, geometry and measurement, and statistics and probability. At the same time, students will learn to develop meaningful and inviting approaches to teaching mathematics classroom settings, with an emphasis on student-centered learning. This course is team taught by Wellesley College faculty with a background in mathematics and quantitative reasoning and an elementary school teacher and mathematics specialist. Weekly fieldwork of 60 minutes in an elementary classroom is required. This course is structured to support students pursuing elementary education certification, but is open to all students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One education course or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBD, Haskell

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition; MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 317
CHEM 302/ EDUC 317 - Sem. Communicating Chemistry

Making scientific discoveries is clearly important, but it is also vital to be able to communicate science effectively to non-expert audiences. How do people learn? And in particular, how do inquiry-based learning techniques improve the learning experience? This course provides students the opportunities to explore and apply current research on learning and instructional strategies by developing a series of hands-on in-class chemistry activities. Students will read primary literature on pedagogical approaches from a range of sources, including chemical education journals. Students will synthesize and apply numerous chemical concepts that they have learned in-depth in previous chemistry classes in order to design and teach a chemistry lesson at a local elementary school. Additionally, students will communicate and teach chemistry to non-expert audiences at a museum or science cafe. This class will be useful to students considering careers in the medical profession, so that they can clearly explain science to their patients; careers in research science, so they can inform the public of their discoveries; and careers in education, so they can teach science in an exciting and meaningful fashion.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 317

Prerequisites: CHEM 205 or CHEM 120.

Instructor: Stanley

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

EDUC 320
EDUC 320 - Observation and Fieldwork

Observation and fieldwork in educational settings. This course may serve to complete the requirement of documented introductory field experiences of satisfactory quality and duration necessary for teacher certification. Arrangements may be made for observation and tutoring in various types of educational programs; at least one urban field experience is required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: EDUC 300 or EDUC 304. Open only to students who plan to student teach. Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Hawes, Rubin

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit

EDUC 321
EDUC 321/ PEAC 312/ SOC 312 - Sem: Global Social Theory

Cultural and intellectual life is still dominated by the West. Although we recognize the importance of globalizing scholarship, our research and teaching still prioritizes western canons and frameworks. Cultural and intellectual inequality are part and parcel of socioeconomic inequality. If we don’t do better at one, we will not do better at the other. We need to master a broader range of methods, tools, and ways of knowing. In this class, Wellesley College students work with students and faculty from Latin America, Asia, and Africa to explore what it means to produce, disseminate, teach about, and act upon knowledge more equitably in different parts of the world. Our goals are to (1) learn to read power in physical, intellectual, virtual, and cultural spaces by witnessing, evaluating, and then acting, (2) gain exposure to ways of asking and answering questions outside the West, (3) reread classical theories in context to explore how we can reinterpret their usefulness and meaning, (4) understand and develop new engaged and critical pedagogies and forms of education, and (5) promote a Southern attitude, that charts more equitable and inclusive forms of intellectual engagement and collaboration. 

This course may serve as a capstone seminar for Peace and Justice majors and minors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 312,EDUC 321

Prerequisites: At least two 200-level or above courses in the social sciences including Peace and Justice Studies.

Instructor: Levitt

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 325
EDUC 325 - Sem: Educating Eng Lang Learners

Students will examine current research and practice in the teaching of English Language Learners, with a focus on secondary education. Students will explore challenges facing this diverse group of learners and how to build on the assets they bring to their classroom communities. Students will develop skills necessary to plan and promote discussion, engagement, and content mastery while supporting continued language development. Lesson planning will prioritize culturally relevant and responsive teaching while acquiring skills to analyze and adapt required teaching materials. Limited fieldwork observations are required either online or in person; more extensive fieldwork can be arranged. The course is structured to support students pursuing middle school and high school teacher licensure and meets requirements for a MA Department of Education endorsement in Sheltered English Immersion when MA Secondary Education certification requirements are completed. It is also applicable to students considering teaching abroad, in urban schools, or pursuing any other work with emerging bilingual youth.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to students who have taken at least one education course or permission of instructor. Spring semester course taught at MIT.

Instructor: Tutin (Fall) Palaia (Spring)

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

EDUC 328
EDUC 328 - CSPW: Social Tech & Adol Dev

Adolescents are developing socially, cognitively, and civically in their online and offline worlds, transforming how formal and informal learning takes place. Students in this course will be digesting research findings pertaining to how social technologies (e.g., Instagram, YouTube, mobile phones) can influence social/emotional, cognitive, academic, and identity development during the tween and teen years. It is critical to develop strategies to inform adolescents, educators, families, youth workers, and policymakers since they are most affected by the implications of these findings. This interdisciplinary writing-intensive course spanning education, psychology, media studies, and health communication fields will involve transforming research into pieces that appeal to the general public. Students work closely to collaborate on drafting and editing pieces each week, including educational policy briefs, op-eds, e-newsletters, social media messaging campaigns, and a researcher interview profile.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to Juniors and Seniors. EDUC 213, EDUC 214, EDUC 215, or EDUC 216 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Charmaraman

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 332
EDUC 332 - Sem: Out-of-School Programs

From early settlement houses and freedom schools to the creation of YMCAs, 4H clubs, and 21st Century Community Learning Centers, community-based afterschool and youth programs have an important history in the United States and are part of the fabric of childhood and adolescent experiences. In this seminar, students will learn about the history, policies, theories, and practices that have shaped youth work practice and the out-of-school (OST) time field. Students will be introduced to the diverse landscape of OST programs, engage in research on issues of equity and access to program opportunities, examine relevant youth development theories, and wrestle with key promises and dilemmas of policy and practice that these educational contexts pose for children, youth, families, and educators.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: One 200 level Education course.

Instructor: Vasudevan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

EDUC 334
EDUC 334 - Sem: Race, Migration, Borders

This seminar examines narratives of immigrant youth and families to understand ways in which race, culture, and migration shape educational experiences. Using ethnography as a methodological lens, we will develop in-depth analyses of research on global migration and immigration to the U.S, examining the influence of policy, public perception, and racism. We wlll explore the role of borders—physical, symbolic, or ideological—to understand how our conceptions of the border and our cultural and physical policing of these borders impact the everyday lives of immigrant families as well as the formation of self, identity, and community. Central to these narratives will be the forms of refusal and resistance that have historically shaped immigrants’ encounters with exclusion and marginalization. Students will also design inquiry-based research projects informed by our study of ethnography in education and that contributes to our understanding of the interplay between race, culture, ethnicity, and migration. Instructor permission required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required. Intended for EDUC majors or minors in Junior or Senior year.

Instructor: Hong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 335
EDUC 335 - Sem: Urban Ed & Emancipatory Research

First and foremost, this seminar explores urban schools through an examination of research and practice. We study the educational experiences of students, families, and educators shaped by the social, political and economic contexts of urban communities. Students investigate recent educational policies such as school closures and school desegregation through the political and cultural forces that shape policy creation, implementation, and community impact. Students examine policy and practice as distinct forces that profoundly shape the other and yet often exist in conflict and tension. Voices of traditionally marginalized yet profoundly impacted communities frame course discussion of urban education, and students learn to discuss education policies and practices dynamically through an analysis of power, race, and agency. To complement their study of urban education, students will explore the role of emancipatory educational research and decolonizing research methodologies and will demonstrate their learning through the implementation of an original field-based research project.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required. Intended for EDUC majors or minors in Junior or Senior year.

Instructor: Hong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

EDUC 338
EDUC 338 - Sem: Qualitative Inquiry

In education, research plays an important role in identifying problems, understanding how those problems and issues play out in schools, and exploring the possibilities for change. In this course, students will understand the process of qualitative research and explore different approaches to qualitative inquiry in education: narrative inquiry, phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, and case study. Students will also examine the ways in which qualitative research can be designed to interact with communities of practice through action-oriented, community-engaged, and participatory models of inquiry that lead to educational change. Students will design a qualitative research proposal that explores a question in education--from the conceptualization of a problem to the development of research questions and on to the processes of data collection. They will incorporate their learning of key methods such as interviewing, participant observation, document analysis as well as their examination of key dilemmas such as researcher positionality.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: One course in education.

Instructor: Hong

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

EDUC 339
EDUC 339 - Sem: Perspectives in Teaching

This small seminar engages students in the study and observation of teaching in all its dimensions, including the role of the teacher, the nuances of classroom interactions, and individual and group learning. Careful examination of curriculum materials and classroom practice in specific teaching fields in order to guide practice and to develop students’ diverse perspectives. Students also learn about teacher research and the process of gathering data and acting to improve learning.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: EDUC 300 or EDUC 304, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Rubin, Hawes

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Open to students seeking substantial observation and teaching experience in a school, mandatory for students seeking teacher certification; students should contact the instructor either before or soon after registration to plan their field placement.

EDUC 350
EDUC 350 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

EDUC 350H
EDUC 350H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

EDUC 360
EDUC 360 - Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Instructor:

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

EDUC 370
EDUC 370 - Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: EDUC 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

EDUC 380
EDUC 380 - Sem: Adv Research Methods

In this course, students will pursue a research question that addresses an issue in education. The course is designed for education studies majors in their senior year who have previously completed one of the education studies capstone courses (EDUC 332, 334, 335, or 338) and are familiar with research methodologies in education such as ethnography, portraiture, participatory/action research, and case study. Students will design and implement an original research project that builds upon previous research in a capstone course or that addresses a new question. The course offers more sophisticated training for data collection methods such as interviewing, participant observation, child study, and narrative inquiry while also introducing students to data analysis skills such as coding through the use of qualitative data analysis software. Students will present their research in a senior symposium at the conclusion of the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: One of the following education capstone courses - EDUC 332, EDUC 334, EDUC 335 or EDUC 338. Education Majors and Minors only.

Instructor: Hong

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: