CAMS 101
CAMS 101 - Intro Cinema & Media Studies

This course introduces students to the study of audio-visual media, including oral, print, photographic, cinematic, broadcast, and digital media forms and practices. Using a case study approach, we will explore the nature of audio-visual communication/representation in historical, cultural, disciplinary, and media-specific contexts, and examine different theoretical and critical perspectives on the role and power of media to influence our social values, political beliefs, identities, and behaviors. We'll also consider how consumers of media representations can and do contest and unsettle their embedded messages. Our emphasis will be on developing the research and analytical tools, modes of reading, and forms of critical practice that can help us to negotiate the increasingly mediated world in which we live.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Prabhu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Required weekly film screening.

CAMS 135
ARTS 165/ CAMS 135 - Intro to Moving Image

This introductory course explores video as an art form. Organized around a series of assignments designed to survey a range of production strategies, the course is a primer to the technical and conceptual aspects of video production and to its historical, critical, and technical discourse. Relationships between video and television, film, installation, and performance art are investigated emphasizing video as a critical intervention in social and visual arts contexts. Weekly readings, screenings, discussions and critique, explore contemporary issues in video and help students develop individual aesthetic and critical skills. Practical knowledge is integrated through lighting, video/sound production and editing workshops.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 135

Prerequisites: Open to First years, Sophomores, and Juniors. Seniors by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Rinland (Spring 2022)

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Meets the Production requirement for CAMS majors.

CAMS 138
ARTS 108/ CAMS 138 - Photography I

Photo I is a foundational studio course exploring key methods and concepts in photography. Technical skills will be addressed through camera work, lighting, and the discussion of photographic images. Studio assignments, readings, discussions, lectures, virtual gallery visits, and critiques will help students build the conceptual, aesthetic, and critical skills essential to understanding photography's broader role in contemporary art, history, and society. Aimed for first year and sophomore students, and those pursuing majors in Studio Art, MAS, or CAMS.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 138

Prerequisites: None. Open to Firstyears and Sophomores. Juniors and Seniors by permission of the instructor and should add themselves to the waitlist.

Instructor: Landeros

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Meets Production requirement for CAMS major.

CAMS 201
CAMS 201 - Technologies of Film & Media

This course investigates the technological, economic, and cultural determinants behind forms of media from the last 150 years, including the telephone, the telegraph, photography, and film, as well as new media like virtual reality and interactive media. If photography realized the desire to transcend mortality and early cinema fulfilled the dream to depict the world, their missions have been extended by technologies that seek to invent new worlds as well as material and virtual realities. Relying on a material theory of film and audio-visual media, the course examines both technologies of making and of circulation, exploring the commercial potential of the entertainment industry. The course will employ relevant texts, films, and other audio-visual artifacts.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CAMS 101, CAMS 105, ARTS 165/CAMS 135, ARTS 108/CAMS 138, ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 202
CAMS 202 - Aesthetics of Film & Media

Examining cinematic forms and styles, this course retraces film's emergence and development as an art and its relations to other artistic, cultural, technological, and socio-economic practices. Analysis of representative films will help understand cinema's relationship to reality, including its reproduction and construction of the "real," the changing terms of spectatorship, and the ways in which film aesthetics have been employed to build ideology and interrogate it. Understanding form as inextricably bound to content, we will appreciate the aesthetic significance of formal choices and innovations within particular films, directorial oeuvres, periods and movements, from classical Hollywood cinema to European New Waves of the 60s and 70s, to the contemporary cinemas of Asia and Latin America.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CAMS 101, CAMS 105, ARTS 165/CAMS 135, ARTS 108/CAMS 138, ARTH 100, WRIT 107, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Morari

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CAMS 203
CAMS 203/ CHIN 243 - Chinese Cinema (in Eng)

This course explores the cinematic conventions and experiments employed by Chinese filmmakers over the past hundred years. Unique Chinese film genres such as left-wing melodrama, martial arts films and model play adaptations, as well as the three "new waves" in China's recent avant-garde cinema, will be examined and discussed. Individual filmic visions and techniques experimented with by important directors such as Fei Mu, Hou Hsiao-hsien, Zhang Yimou, and Jia Zhangke will be closely analyzed. Class discussions will aim to help students understand the history, politics, and aesthetics of Chinese cinema. Theoretical aspects of film studies will also be incorporated into class readings and discussions. No prior knowledge of China or film studies is required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 20 3

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Mingwei Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 207
ARTH 226/ CAMS 207 - History of Photography

Photography is so much a part of our private and public lives, and it plays such an influential role in our environment, that we often forget to examine its aesthetics, meanings, and histories. This course provides an introduction to these analyses by examining the history of photography from the 1830s to the present. Considering fine arts and mass media practices, the class will examine the works of individual practitioners as well as the emergence of technologies, aesthetic directions, markets, and meanings.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 20 7

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 strongly recommended.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 208
CAMS 208/ ENG 208 - Writing for Television

An introduction to writing for television. We’ll read, watch, and discuss pilot episodes of network and cable comedies and dramas. We'll study and practice the basics: script format, episode structure, story and character development, visual description. Each student will develop and write their own original TV pilot, and students will give and receive feedback through the workshop process.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 20 8

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Holmes

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit. This course is repeatable one time for an additional unit of credit.

CAMS 210
CAMS 210 - Critical Computing History

The standard narrative of digital technologies is that they change the world for the better: they facilitate access to information and create new efficiencies in labor and entertainment. But does this story accurately reflect the impact of technology on global society? In this course, we will undertake a critical investigation of the seminal moments and objects in the history of computing, from cybernetics to social media. Along the way, we will work to focus on perspectives that have too often remained invisible in this history, for instance the gendered role of labor in computer programming and production and the prevalence of social bias in the design and function of technologies like Artificial Intelligence (AI).

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Nicholaus Gutierrez

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CAMS 212
CAMS 212 - Global Hollywood & World Cinema

How has Hollywood been altering its product to appeal to overseas audiences, particularly the vast and growing Chinese market? And how have local and regional cinemas pushed back? In this class, we take a critical approach to two terms used to describe these processes: “Global Hollywood,” on the one hand, and “World Cinema,” on the other. We examine how Hollywood has been drawing on foreign cultures, increasingly embracing narrative and aesthetic hybridity while at the same time foreign filmmakers have been repackaging their cultures for the international art cinema market. We will examine aesthetic and marketing strategies that define both the place of Hollywood in our contemporary society, as well as how we think about “national cinemas” in the era of globalization. Finally, we consider how the rise of streaming platforms and new producers like Netflix and Amazon has disrupted this media landscape, leading to new forms, genres, and styles.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CAMS 101 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 217
CAMS 217 - Viral Media

Modern media pass on information with great rapidity. News, fake news, and rumors spread and assume the characteristics of a virus, and their social impact can potentially foster public and even global contagion. This course probes viral media at moments of crisis, from the Spanish-American War that popularized the circulation of cinematographic footage, to the challenges posed recently by the Covid-19. We will employ a comparative approach sensitive to both the dangers (technical glitches, the political abuse of audiovisual machinery, computer viruses, and software security threats) and the possible benefits of media contagion. The course will devote particular attention to the use of film, television, social platforms, and communication technologies during World War II, the Vietnam War, 9/11, the 2016 elections, and the Coronavirus pandemic.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 218
CAMS 218 - Theories of Media

Considering media as diverse as photography, film, radio, television, video, sound recording, and the Internet, this course is an introduction to the major theoretical works of media theory through a close attention to both texts and media artifacts. Topics include theories of ideology, spectatorship and reception, structuralism and poststructuralism, modernism and postmodernism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, postcolonialism, feminism, and queer theory. Through class discussions and writing assignments, students will consider both prevailing conceptual currents as well as alternative formulations in order to question the various forces that work to shape media as material and discursive systems. Readings will be structured so that media works are paired with historical and contemporary texts in order to draw out the connections between the theory, history, and practice of media.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 219
CAMS 219/ ES 219 - Eco Cinema and Media

This course examines ecology’s intersection with cinema and media studies. Amidst climate change, ecological theorists have complicated boundaries between nature and technology and between humans and nonhumans. We will focus on the intersection of these ecological conversations with cinema and media studies. This course will consider a range of media, from mushrooms to cyborgs; explore cinematic innovations aimed at depicting nonhuman actors; discuss how media create their own environments; and cover topics like digital waste. Course readings will include a range of contemporary ecological perspectives, including texts from Feminist Science and Technology Studies, Black Studies, and Indigenous Critical Theory. We will apply these ideas in discussions of recent films.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: ES 219

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:  

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 220
CAMS 220 - Decolonizing Film History

Why is it that only a limited number of filmmakers and national cinemas figure prominently in histories of cinema? Why do film scholars tend to prioritize artistic direction and ignore the labor of technicians or seasonal employees? Why is Alice Guy-Blaché overshadowed by the “great men” who, it is claimed, “invented” cinema? With such questions in mind, we will re-scan conventional film historiography and claim places for previously overlooked individuals and practices. We seek to create an inclusive canon that acknowledges the work of women, minor cinemas, and indigenous communities. In an endeavor to decolonize film history, this course will take a global approach to cinema’s rich and vastly unsurveyed legacy of more than a century.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Bardsley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 221
CAMS 221 - 21st Century Documentary

This course will consider how documentary film and media have responded to the expansion of digital technology, the birth of social media, and a rapidly evolving media environment to engage with contemporary global concerns like climate change, migration, and rising authoritarian politics. Students will gain a familiarity with issues central to documentary studies like voice, authority, authenticity, and evidence and analyze a variety of non-fiction texts from the past twenty years, in media forms ranging from theatrical film and broadcast television to podcasts and documentary games. Assignments will include response papers, an analytical essay, and a class presentation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 222
CAMS 222 - Documentary Film and Media

This course surveys the history, theory, and practice of documentary film, considering the ways its forms and ethics have changed since the beginning of cinema. We study the major modes of the documentary, including cinema verité, direct cinema, investigative documentary, ethnographic film, agit-prop and activist media, and the personal essay, as well as recent forms such as the docudrama, the archival film, “mockumentary,” and Web-based forms. We will examine the “reality effects” of these works, focusing on the ways in which they create their authority. We will ask: How do these films shape notions of truth, reality, and point of view? What are the ethics and politics of representation and who speaks for whom when we watch a documentary? What do documentaries make visible or conceal?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 224
CAMS 224/ ITAS 212 - Italian Women Directors (Eng)

This course examines the films of a number of major Italian women directors across two artistic generations: Cavani and Wertmüller from the 1960s to the 1970s; Archibugi, Comencini, and others from the 1990s to the 2010s. Neither fascist cinema nor neorealism fostered female talents, so it was only with the emergence of feminism and the women's movement of the 1960s and 1970s that a space for female voices in Italian cinema was created. The course will explore how women directors give form to their directorial signatures in film, focusing on their films' formal features and narrative themes in the light of their socio-historical context.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 224

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Laviosa

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 225
CAMS 225 - Cinema in the Public Sphere

How did cinema, originally hailed as a popular entertainment, achieve the social legitimacy that elevated it to the rank of an art form and an industrial force? This course examines the development of cinema as an institution from its origins to its present digital extensions, with a particular focus on the United States and its dominance in the domestic and global markets. Relying on academic scholarship, film criticism, and a selection of films, we will examine the historical, social, and aesthetic conditions that led to the creation of the movie theater, art houses, and multiplexes, as well as cinema's relationship to television and online streaming. The study of the screening technologies and physical spaces will be accompanied by an analysis of how race, gender, and class played in drawing in or keeping out moviegoers.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Morari

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CAMS 227
CAMS 227 - Television

What does subscribing to a channel on YouTube have in common with tuning into the live broadcast of Kraft Television Theatre? Despite major technological, industrial and cultural change since television’s first golden age in the 1950s, televisual concepts and metaphors remain central to our understanding of media. This course will seek to understand both television history and the contemporary new media context by unpacking these concepts. We will think about television’s ontology, viewership, and transnational reach, in order to understand how television has shaped and continues to shape our identities and our perspectives on the world around us. We will watch shows ranging from I Love Lucy and Hill Street Blues to The Real World and Atlanta.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 230
ARTS 260/ CAMS 230 - Moving Image Studio

Creative exploration of the moving image as it relates to digital methods of animation, video, and motion graphics. Hands-on production of audio, image, text, and time-based media synthesis, with a conceptual emphasis on nonlinear narrative, communication design, and visual expression. Screenings and lectures on historical and contemporary practices, coupled with readings and discussions of the theoretical, artistic, and cultural issues in the moving image.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 230

Prerequisites: ARTS 108/CAMS 138, ARTS 165/CAMS 135, or ARTS 221/CAMS 239.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Wendy Judge Paulson '69 Ecology of Place Living Laboratory course. This course does not satisfy the Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory requirement.

CAMS 232
ANTH 232/ CAMS 232 - Anthropology of Media

This course introduces students to key analytic frameworks through which media and the mediation of culture have been examined. Using an anthropological approach, students will explore how media as representation and as cultural practice have been fundamental to the (trans)formation of modern sensibilities and social relations. We will examine various technologies of mediation-from the Maussian body as “Man's first technical instrument” to print capitalism, radio and cassette cultures, cinematic and televisual publics, war journalism, the digital revolution, and the political milieu of spin and public relations. Themes in this course include: media in the transformation of the senses; media in the production of cultural subjectivities and publics; and the social worlds and cultural logics of media institutions and sites of production.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 232

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Karakasidou

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 233
CAMS 233/ JWST 233 - American Jews and the Media

This course examines Jews’ roles in the development of the American mass media and popular culture, as well as representations of Jewishness in a range of media from the turn of the 20th century to the present. We will focus on print, recorded, and broadcast media—including magazines, newspapers, pamphlets, record albums, radio, film, and television—and study some of the crucial figures in the histories of these cultural forms, while considering how Jewishness has been packaged for and presented to American audiences. Cultural productions studied will include Abie the Agent, The Jazz Singer, The Goldbergs, MAD Magazine, Annie Hall, Seinfeld, the New Yorker, and This American Life.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 233

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Josh Lambert

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 234
CAMS 234/ ENG 204 - The Art of Screenwriting

A creative writing course in a workshop setting for those interested in the theory and practice of writing for film. This course focuses on the full-length feature film, both original screenplays and screen adaptations of literary work. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 234

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cezair-Thompson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit. This course can be repeated once for credit.

CAMS 235
ARTS 265/ CAMS 235 - Intermed Video Production

An intermediate level studio that guides students through different approaches to experimental video production while challenging linear narrative and documentary conventions. Students experiment with non-narrative approaches to content, structure, and technique. Investigations of space and performance are informed by poetry, literature, sound, color, fragmentation, and abstraction. Building upon the historical legacy of the moving image, students incorporate self-exploration, social critique, and manipulation of raw experience into an aesthetic form. This course explores the independent media and video fields as students develop independent video projects and articulate their artistic process through a series of presentations and critiques.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 235

Prerequisites: ARTS 165/CAMS 135 and CAMS 101 or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CAMS 238
ARTS 208/ CAMS 238 - Photo II: Digital/Analog Rift

Building on the foundation of Photo I, this intermediate course aims to strengthen students' conceptual photographic acumen while introducing advanced studio and location lighting, digital retouching, inkjet printing, and basic multimedia production. Assignments address contemporary and historic theories of photography as contemporary art and the aesthetic and cultural implications of the ubiquity of digital photography. Emphasis is on developing project-based photography through cultivating research, planning, conceptual, and production skills.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 238

Prerequisites: ARTS 108/CAMS 138, or ARTS 221, or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Landeros

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CAMS 239
ARTS 221/ CAMS 239 - Digital Imaging

Introduction to artistic production through electronic imaging, manipulation, and output. Emphasis on expression, continuity, and sequential structuring of visuals through the integration of image, text, and motion. Image output for print, screen, and adaptive surfaces are explored in conjunction with production techniques of image capture, lighting, and processing. Lectures and screenings of historic and contemporary uses of technology for artistic and social application of electronic imaging.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 239

Prerequisites: Any 100-level ARTS course.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CAMS 240
CAMS 240/ WGST 223 - Gendering the Bronze Screen

The history of Chicanxs and Latinxs on the big screen is a long and complicated one. To understand the changes that have occurred in the representation of Chicanxs/Latinxs, this course proposes an analysis of films that traces various stereotypes to examine how those images have been perpetuated, altered, and ultimately resisted. From the Anglicizing of names to the erasure of racial backgrounds, the ways in which Chicanxs and Latinxs are represented has been contingent on ideologies of race, gender, class, and sexuality. We will be examining how films have typecast Chicanas/Latinas as criminals or as "exotic" based on their status as women of color, and how Chicano/Latino filmmakers continue the practice of casting Chicanas/Latinas solely as supporting characters to male protagonists.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 240

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Mata

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 241
CAMS 241/ WGST 249 - Asian/American Women in Film

This course will serve as an introduction to representations of Asian/American women in film beginning with silent classics and ending with contemporary social media. In the first half of the course, we examine the legacy of Orientalism, the politics of interracial romance, the phenomenon of "yellow face", and the different constructions of Asian American femininity, masculinity, and sexuality. In the second half of the course, we look at "Asian American cinema" where our focus will be on contemporary works, drawing upon critical materials from film theory, feminist studies, Asian American studies, history, and cultural studies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 241

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Creef

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 243
CAMS 243/ SAS 243 - Love in Indian Cinema

This course explores the treatment of various types of love-for the beloved, the family, the community, the motherland or the divine-in Indian cinema, the largest and one of the oldest film industries in the world. Beginning with Indian cinema's early phase in the colonial milieu, the course continues with an examination of its flourishing in popular and art films in the later part of the twentieth century and films made by diaspora Indians. We will watch films by prominent directors like Bimal Roy, Guru Dutt, Raj Kapoor, Mani Ratnam, and Meera Nayar that have “love” as a core theme. With particular attention to the distinctive grammar of song, dance and intense drama, we will consider how Indian cinema offers a mirror to the society and culture of India, reworking its long conventions of narratives and performance in a medium imported from Europe.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 243

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Shukla-Bhatt

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 250
CAMS 250 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and director of Cinema and Media Studies required.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

CAMS 250H
CAMS 250H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and director of Cinema and Media Studies required.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

CAMS 255
ARTS 255/ CAMS 255 - Dynamic Interface Design

Critical examination of the expanding field of information and interface design for interactive media. Emphasis will be on effective visual communication, information design, and creative content creation for online and digital platforms. Hands-on production will focus on design methods, theory, limitations leading to innovative approaches. Screenings and discussions on contemporary practices, theoretical, artistic, and cultural issues.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 255

Prerequisites: ARTS 108 /CAMS 138, ARTS 109 and CS 110 or CS 111.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 261
CAMS 261 - African Cinema

This course focuses on cinematic productions made by African filmmakers and shot in Africa. We will critically examine the stakes of a "pan-African" approach to the study of African cinema. We will focus on the way contemporary African filmmakers use innovative experiments in the cinematic medium to create a dynamic and provocative dialogue with important aspects of African reality: on one hand, urbanization, migration, religious extremism, economic disparity, patriarchy; on the other, strong collectivities, indigenous solutions, gender fluidity, traditional and modern environmental awareness. We will follow how the video boom of the 80s and 90s that established Nollywood of Nigeria and Gollywood of Ghana consolidated a robust and faithful spectatorship in Africa and amongst the vast African diaspora. Through the study of specific techniques, we will track the ambition of contemporary African filmmakers to create and expand African cinematic aesthetics, target world audiences, and sustain a local spectatorship.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Anjali Prabhu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 271
AFR 271/ CAMS 271 - History of Slavery Thru Film

This course will examine the history of cinema through the lens of American slavery. Outside of the classroom much of what we know, or think about slavery derives often from popular media-particularly through film and television. Can Hollywood do the work of historians? Does historical interpretation through film serve as useful, beneficial, or detrimental? Can we make an argument for the historical efficacy of films? What is the difference between historical accuracy and historical authenticity? In examining these films, we will take into account the time period, location, and the political and social context in which they were created. We will see how much film tells us about slavery and, most importantly, what film might tell us about ourselves. Through a critical reading of a range of historical works, cultural critiques and primary sources, students will have a better comprehension of how historians and filmmakers both differ or find mutual agreement in their understanding of the past.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 271

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Jackson

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 277
CAMS 277 - Film Noir

A journey through the dark side of the American cinematic imagination. Emerging during World War II and its aftermath, Film Noir presents a pessimistic, morally ambiguous inversion of Hollywood uplift, delivered in glamorous visual style. This course will explore Film Noir from its origins, through the revival of the genre in the early 1970s, to its ongoing influence in contemporary cinema, as noir has expanded beyond Hollywood to become a global form. We'll pay particular attention to noir's transformation of cinematic style, and to its representations of masculinity and femininity. Films that may be studied include Howard Hawks's The Big Sleep, Billy Wilder's Double Indemnity, Robert Altman's The Long Goodbye, Roman Polanski's Chinatown, and David Lynch's Mulholland Drive.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Vernon Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 286
CAMS 286/ GER 286 - Film& Propag Nazi Germ(in Eng)

This course examines the cinematic output of Nazi Germany as a test case for the development of film as propaganda. We consider the cinematic medium as entertainment and as a cultural event with the potential to influence a population. We trace the forebears of Nazi film, including WWI propaganda produced in Britain, France and Germany and Soviet films made to serve the revolutionary agenda. We examine the ways in which Goebbels' Ministry of Propaganda deployed both overtly propagandist films and films that couched Nazi ideals in narratives from melodrama to fantasy, and examine whether films could exceed their official aims and become subversive. And we consider post-WWII developments: the continuing careers of producers of propaganda and the ways that modern media shapes new forms of propaganda.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 286

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 301
CAMS 301 - Sem: Surveillance Media

In 1895, the first movie camera filmed workers leaving a factory.  That movie camera has been replaced by a security camera that both protects and monitors those workers.  From the early cameras to the latest technologies, the history of cinema and media can be understood as a recurrent series of surveillance techniques.  This course examines surveillance technologies and monitoring practices to explore how technology and ideology came to play together in audio-visual forms.  We will examine the politics and ethics of security and surveillance, stretching from the first manifestations of voyeuristic photography  to such modern forms as drones, GPS and user security on social media.  Course materials will include readings as well as features, documentaries and video installations.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Either CAMS 201 or CAMS 202, plus another CAMS-200 level course

Instructor: Codru?a Morari

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 302
CAMS 302 - Sem: Media Archaeology

This course will familiarize students with media archaeology as an alternative methodology to the study of film and media. Three major events occurred in 21st-century media that make classical methodologies obsolete: the proliferation of digital technologies; the emergence of new media industries in Asia, Latin America, and Africa; and the loss of cachet of European art film. Instead of insisting on cinema’s uniqueness as an art form, media archaeology examines how cinema’s past has been embedded in other media practices, other technologies and social uses. By foregrounding a media archaeology approach, this course will examine cinema history in interaction and competition with other forms of entertainment, scientific pursuits, practical applications and military uses.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: CAMS 201 or CAMS 202.

Instructor: Bardsley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 304
CAMS 304 - Sem: Posthumanism

What does it mean to be human in the digital age? Where do modern Western ideas of humanity or subjectivity come from, and how are they changing in an age of global commerce and digital technology? In this course, we will explore these questions under the broad rubric of posthumanism, a multi-disciplinary body of literature which is concerned with the ways that the concepts of humanism and identity are manifest with and through modern technology. We will investigate posthumanism and related concepts from multiple perspectives: cultural, historical, philosophical, and aesthetic, with a particular emphasis on representations of identity and labor in popular culture, from film and television to digital media.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: CAMS 201 or CAMS 202 or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Nicholaus Gutierrez

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CAMS 305
ANTH 305/ CAMS 305 - Ethnographic Film

This seminar explores ethnographic film as a genre for representing "reality," anthropological knowledge and cultural lives. We will examine how ethnographic film emerged in a particular intellectual and political economic context as well as how subsequent conceptual and formal innovations have shaped the genre. We will also consider social responses to ethnographic film in terms of the contexts for producing and circulating these works; the ethical and political concerns raised by cross-cultural representation; and the development of indigenous media and other practices in conversation with ethnographic film. Throughout the course, we will situate ethnographic film within the larger project for representing "culture," addressing the status of ethnographic film in relation to other documentary practices, including written ethnography, museum exhibitions, and documentary film.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 30 5

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or two 200-level units in anthropology, cinema and media studies, economics, history, political science, or sociology or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 308
CAMS 308/ ENG 308 - Advanced Writing for TV

In Advanced Writing for Television, we’ll pick up where Writing for Television left off. Students will continue to practice the skills of writing teleplays—character and story development; structure and arc; tension and conflict; audience, premise, and tone; scenes, description, action, and dialogue; and voice and clarity. We’ll start by studying a range of TV shows: comedies, dramas, web series, and others. Through reading scripts, watching shows, and discussing both in class, students will develop a more advanced and specific understanding of what makes a show work. Through their own writing, students will practice applying the lessons they’ve learned. In the workshop process, we’ll discuss everything that comes up in students’ scripts—what’s working, what’s not, and what we can all learn about TV writing from each example.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 30 8

Prerequisites: ENG 208/CAMS 208

Instructor: Holmes

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 310
CAMS 310 - Film Festivals

This course examines how the over 4,000 annual film festivals impact the economics, circulation, and aesthetics of cinema. Events like Cannes, Berlin, and Venice may be known for glitzy red carpet premieres but are also important nodes in the global film market; less well-known, local, or niche festivals bring communities together and raise awareness about social issues. Students will learn the history of major A-level festivals and examine their global geopolitical implications. Furthermore, academic texts from the new and burgeoning subfield of festival studies will help us consider film’s role in conversations about human rights, environmentalism, and LGBTQ+ identity. Students will compare festival histories, objectives, and programming to construct arguments about how festivals have impacted global film circulation. Students will also plan a hypothetical festival to think through the practical concerns of programming.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Either CAMS 201 or CAMS 202, plus another CAMS-200 level course.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 312
CAMS 312 - Media and Social Movements

The environmental crisis, Black Lives Matter, #MeToo: it often feels like we are living in exceptional times, amidst social movements accelerated by the rise of new technologies. This class explores major social movements throughout the twentieth and into the twenty-first century, with special attention to case studies from Latin America, the U.S., Europe, and the Middle East. Throughout the semester, we ask two distinct, but interrelated questions. First, how have different media sought to capture social movements in their unfolding, giving permanent form to something essentially ephemeral and dynamic? Second, what artistic practices, ideologies, and methods of social organizing have been particularly effective in the past, and which continue to inform contemporary calls for social justice? Small, creative assignments will supplement two papers built around the case studies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Either CAMS 201 or CAMS 202 plus another CAMS-200 level course.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 313
ARTS 313/ CAMS 313 - Virtual Form

Introduction to the design and production of three-dimensional objects and spaces using industry-standard modeling software. Overview of basic modeling, surface design, and camera techniques. Emphasis on creative application of the media, in relation to architectural, experimental, and time-based forms. Screenings and lectures on traditional and contemporary practices, coupled with readings and discussions of the theoretical, artistic, and cultural issues in the virtual world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 313

Prerequisites: Any ARTS course. Strong computer familiarity needed.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CAMS 321
ARTS 321/ CAMS 321 - Advanced New Media

Various topics in New Media are explored through research, creative activity, and theoretical discussion. Topics address historical as well as contemporary issues that bridge art and technology. This is an advanced level New Media course giving students the opportunity to focus on personal projects, explore contemporary and historical new media concepts as well as receive critiques from other students. Topics covered will focus on media history and research, contemporary intermedia artists, designers, thinkers and scientists, along with readings and discussions. Collaboration will be encouraged between Studio Art, Architecture, Music, CAMS, Media Arts, Theater and Computer Science.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 321

Prerequisites: Two 200-level courses in ARTS, CAMS, or MAS.

Instructor: Joskowicz

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: ARTS 321/CAMS 321 may be repeated once for credit.

CAMS 324
CAMS 324 - Film Genre, Genre Films

We constantly describe films with labels like action, horror, rom-com, sci-fi, musical, western, but where do those categories come from, and how do we decide what belongs within them? This course will explore the concept of film genre in terms both theoretical and practical. We’ll examine the antecedents of cinema’s genre system in literary criticism, read key works of film genre theory, and watch films in a wide range of genres. Among the questions we’ll address are: How do ideas about genre help us understand the cinematic experience? How do genre categories influence the production and marketing of films, and the discourse around them? How do ideas about genre connect to social identities, such as race and gender, to create categories like “chick flick” or “Blaxploitation”? What criteria differentiate the genres we value from those we don’t?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Either CAMS 201 or CAMS 202, and an additional 200-level CAMS course.

Instructor: Vernon Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 327
CAMS 327 - CSPW: Pub. Writing Film & TV

This course will explore a wide range of writing on current film and television, thinking about the forms of contemporary discourse on the moving image and ways our own writing can join the conversation. We will read and write reviews, trend pieces, and star studies, bringing our specialized knowledge as moving image enthusiasts to bear on pieces intended to speak to and engage a broad reading public. Students will develop and present their writing in workshop discussions, and serve as editors to their peers. Readings from classic and contemporary writers on film and television will help us refine our sense of what makes writing on media illuminating, accessible, and compelling.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: CAMS 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 335
ARTS 365/ CAMS 335 - Advanced Video Production

This advanced-level class centers on the production and critique of individual film and video work, along with an ongoing schedule of screenings, readings, and discussions that investigate various positions from artists and directors on the dynamics of space on screen. Our focus will be on the construction of cinematic space as a formal and conceptual component of storytelling. Using poetry, film, and literature as guides to navigating both constructed and conceptual landscapes, student projects will oscillate between portraiture and social documentary. Formally, this class explores advanced strategies of image and sound manipulation, both technical and conceptual. It covers pre-production planning (storyboards and scripting), refinement of digital editing techniques, visual effects, post-production, as well as audio and sonic components. Students will develop semester-long video/film projects and will articulate their artistic process through a series of presentations and critiques over the semester.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 335

Prerequisites: ARTS 165/CAMS 135 and CAMS 101 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 338
ARTS 308/ CAMS 338 - Photography III

Advanced explorations of aesthetic and content issues through the use of both traditional light-sensitive and digital methodologies. Advanced photographic techniques and equipment will be presented in response to each student's work. Continued emphasis is placed on research into the content and context of the photographic image in contemporary practice through visiting artist events as well as virtual gallery and museum visits.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 338

Prerequisites: ARTS 108/CAMS 138, and either ARTS 208/CAMS 238 or ARTS 221/CAMS 239, or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Landeros

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 350
CAMS 350 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CAMS 350H
CAMS 350H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CAMS 360
CAMS 360 - Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the director.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CAMS 366
ARTS 366/ CAMS 366 - Advanced Digital Projects

This intensive virtual studio class is for advanced students interested in exploring the relationship between architecture and narrative. The class will begin with research into filmic environments that utilize place, architecture and objects as narrative tools. We will look at the use of interiors and exteriors, circulation between spaces, and the use of props and/or computer generated imagery to "make diagetic space". The first half of the course will focus on research in cinema, art installations, architectural projects and visiting lecturers who will expand on their work in either film or architecture.
In the second half of the course, students will focus on a design project requiring comprehensive and integrative study to create their own narrative space.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 366

Prerequisites: CAMS 101 and ARTS165/ CAMS 135, or ARTS 265/ CAMS 235, or an equivalent MIT Architecture Studio. Note that knowledge of some, if not all, of the following software is essential - Photoshop, AutoCad, Sketchup, 3D Studio Max, and/or Rhino.

Instructor: Claudia Joskowicz

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 370
CAMS 370 - Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: CAMS 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.