AFR 105
AFR 105 - Intro to Black Experience

This course serves as the introductory offering in Africana Studies. It explores, in an interdisciplinary fashion, salient aspects of the Black experience, both ancient and modern, and at the local, national and international levels. This course provides an overview of many related themes, including slavery, Africanisms, gender, colonialism, civil rights, and pan-African exchange.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 46

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Carter-Jackson

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 115
AFR 115/ PHIL 115 - Intro to Afr Amer Philosophy

This course serves as an introduction to key themes and debates in African American philosophy. With an emphasis on concepts, arguments, and intellectual traditions, the course focuses on issues of resistance, liberation, and freedom. Drawing on history, literature, and film, we will consider questions such as: How do we define freedom in light of experiences of enslavement? Where does agency come from? How does resistance emerge within a context of oppression? How does gender inform our judgments regarding what counts as resistance? Authors covered include W. E. B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Anna Julia Cooper, Angela Davis, Lewis Gordon, and Jose Medina.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 115

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Mandatory Credit/Non Credit.

AFR 201
AFR 201/ ENG 260 - African-Amer Lit Tradition

A survey of the Afro-American experience as depicted in literature from the eighteenth century through the present. Study of various forms of literary expression including the short story, autobiography, literary criticism, poetry, drama, and essays as they have been used as vehicles of expression for Black writers during and since the slave experience.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 260

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 206
AFR 206 - African Amer Hist 1500-present

An introductory survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of African Americans from their African origins to the present. This course examines the foundations of the discipline of African American history, slavery, Africans in colonial America, migration, Reconstruction, and Harlem Renaissance artistry and scholarship.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Jackson

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 209
AFR 209 - Af Am History: Slavery to Civil War

This course is a survey of the first half of African American History and Culture and traces the historical, political, social, and cultural contexts of black Americans from the slave trade to the American Civil War. Thematically, we explore the meaning of freedom, the dynamic between black struggle and white resistance, and the ways in which factors such as gender and geography complicate any notions of a single black experience. Each week we will focus on different events, writings, narratives, debates, and political ideologies. This course combines discussion, lecture, and multimedia. It presents a narrative, interpretation, and analysis of African American history.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Carter-Jackson

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 210
AFR 210 - Af Am History: Reconstruction to Present

This course is a survey of the second half of African American History and Culture and traces the historical, political, social, and cultural experiences of black Americans from Reconstruction to the modern freedom movement for Black Lives. This course will focus upon a number of specific movements in the history of black Americans. Thematically, we explore the meaning of freedom, the dynamic between black struggle and white resistance, and the ways in which factors such as gender and geography complicate any notions of a single black experience. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Carter-Jackson

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 211
AFR 211 - Intro African Literature

The development of African literature in English and in translation. Although special attention will be paid to the novels of Chinua Achebe, writers such as Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Camara Laye, Wole Soynika, Miriama Ba, Nawal El Saadawi, and Buchi Emecheta will also be considered. The influence of oral tradition on these writers' styles as well as the thematic links between them and writers of the Black awakening in America and the West Indies will be discussed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 212
AFR 212/ ENG 279 - Black Women Writers

The Black woman writer's efforts to shape images of herself as Black, as women, and as an artist. The problem of literary authority for the Black woman writer, criteria for a Black woman's literary tradition, and the relation of Black feminism or "womanism" to the articulation of a distinctively Black and female literary aesthetic.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 279

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 215
AFR 215 - Unpacking Blackness

This course is designed to examine the meaning of race and ethnicity and the determinants and fluidity of membership in a particular racial or ethnic group. We will also explore different ways to measure ethnic and racial identification and how ethnicity affects attitudes, economic development, social mobilization and migration. We will seek to assess to what extent ethnic and racial identities shape trust and prejudice, and examine the impact of ethnic diversity on development and the provision of public goods. Analyses will be made of ethnic and racial electoral politics and the varying extent and impact of ethnic voting patterns in relation to democratic governance and ethnic conflict.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Dendere

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 225
AFR 225/ PSYC 225 - Intro Black Psychology

This course is designed to provide an overview of Black psychology as a field of study. Both conceptual frameworks and empirical research related to the psychology of individuals of African descent will be presented, with appropriate historical and sociopolitical context. Topics include the Black child, Black youth, achievement and schooling, kinship and family, identity development and socialization, gender norms and behaviors, sexuality, religion and spirituality, wellness, and mental health. The course will also look at the psychology of Black people through the lenses of gender, ethnicity/nationality/culture, and religion. Additionally, this course will explore the legacies of enslavement, racism, discrimination, and racial violence as factors in Black psychology, as well as the role of the Black social movement in the psychology of Black people. The course will incorporate current topics and controversies related to Black psychology, as well as recent advances in the field of Black psychology.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: PSYC 225

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 227
AFR 227/ EDUC 227 - Black Girlhood

This course is designed to examine interdisciplinary theories, methods, and analytical approaches to define and study of Black girlhood. We will explore Black girlhood as a developmental period, a public and private performance, and a source of identity and agency. Students will discuss the duality of Black girlhood, risk versus resilience, to understand how Black girlhood is enacted and evaluated in families, schools, communities, mass media, and the larger society. The cultural, social, psychological, and political constructions of Black girlhood in the U.S. context will be interrogated by analyzing academic texts, film, media, poetry, novels, art, and music focused on Black girls.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 227

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Lindsay-Dennis

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 228
AFR 228/ PHIL 228 - Black Feminist Philosophy

Focusing on representations of black women in popular culture (including Beyonce's Lemonade), this course analyzes patterns of thought that define feminist African American culture today. Our focus will be how black women choose to represent, invent, and define themselves. The course will emphasize the intersection of sexuality and spirituality, employing the hoodoo woman, blues woman, diva, and fixer as categories of analysis. We will analyze how each of these figures demonstrate both agency and vulnerability, what function they serve in advancing black feminist ideals, and how they address or signal tensions within black communities. Authors studied include: Angela Davis, Alice Walker, Patricia Hill Collins, Zora Neale Hurston, bell hooks, Kristie Dotson, and Joy James.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 228

Prerequisites: Open to First-Years who have taken one course in philosophy and to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors without prerequisite.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 236
AFR 236/ POL2 231 - Intro to African Politics

This course offers an introduction to contemporary African politics. The primary goal is to introduce students to the diversity of challenges and development issues facing African countries since independence. Questions motivating the course include: (1) Why state institutions weaker in African than in other developing regions? (2) What explains Africa's slow economic growth? (3) What can be done to improve political accountability on the continent? (4) Why have some African countries been plagued by high levels of political violence while others have not? 


In answering these questions, we will examine Africa’s historical experiences, its economic heritage, and the international context in which it is embedded.  At the same time, we will explore how Africans have responded to unique circumstances to shape their own political and economic situations.  


As we address the core themes of the course, we will draw on a wide range of academic disciplines, including political science, history, economics and anthropology. We will study particular events in particular African countries, but we will also examine broad patterns across countries and use social science concepts and methods to try to explain them. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: POL 2231

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Dendere

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 239
AFR 239 - Sem: African Civilizations

This course explores the historical landscape of Ancient Africa, with specific emphasis on its founding civilizations, politics, trade & commerce, culture and cosmologies. It serves to dispel the myth that the African continent was ahistorical, “dark” and primitive before European invasion in the 1400s. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the course encourages students to critically engage Africa from an Afro-centric perspective by examining its ancient kingdoms such as Egypt, Ghana, Mali, Songhay and Great Zimbabwe. It is anticipated that by studying these early civilizations and cultural formations, students will see Africa’s contribution and engagement in the global exchange of ideas and goods. Major themes include the political, economic and social impacts of European imperialism; the Atlantic Slave Trade; ‘Legitimate Trade’ and prelude to colonialism.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Fitzpatrick

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 242
AFR 242/ REL 214 - New World Afro-Atlantic Religions

With readings, documentary films, discussions, and lectures, this course will examine the complex spiritual beliefs and expressions of peoples of African descent in Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, and North America. The course surveys African diasporic religions such as Candomble, Santeria, Voodoo, Shango, and African American religions. Attention will be paid to how diasporic Africans practice religion for self-definition, community building, and sociocultural critique, and for reshaping the religious and cultural landscapes of the Americas.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: REL 214

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Fitzpatrick

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 243
AFR 243/ PEAC 243 - The Black Church

This course examines the development of the Black Church and the complexities of black religious life in the United States. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores the religious life of African Americans from twin perspectives: 1) historical, theological dimensions, and 2) the cultural expression, particularly music and art. Special emphasis will be placed on gospel music, Womanist and Black Liberation theologies as forms of political action and responses to interpretations of race in the context of American religious pluralism.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 243

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Fitzpatrick

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 245
AFR 245/ POL3 245 - The Impact of Globalization

This course is designed to offer an inside look into the processes of globalization in Sub Saharan Africa and the Caribbean. This course will focus on the ways that international forces, the political economy and new technologies are affecting citizens and countries on the continent, as well as the way that African and Caribbean countries and actors are influencing the rest of the world.  We will explore a diverse set of topics including changing political landscapes,  digital & technological change and development, immigration, art and culture, foreign aid, and China’s role in Africa and the Caribbean. The course will attempt to highlight the new opportunities for citizens as well as the challenges that remain for African and Caribbean countries in the globalized world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: POL 3245

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Dendere

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

AFR 249
AFR 249 - Black Women's History

This course focuses on African American Women's history in the United States with certain aspects of black women's activism and leadership covered within the African Diaspora. The course is intended explore the ways in which these women engaged in local, national, and international freedom struggles while simultaneously defining their identities as wives, mothers, leaders, citizens, and workers. The course will pay special attention to the diversity of black women’s experiences and to the dominant images of black women in America from Mumbet (the first enslaved black woman to sue for her freedom and win) to contemporary issues of race, sex, and class in the Age of Obama. We will explore such questions as: What is black Women’s History? How does black women’s history add to our understanding of American history? Where should black women’s history go from here?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Carter-Jackson

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 250
AFR 250 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

AFR 256
AFR 256/ PORT 256 - The Portuguese-Speaking World

This course is conducted in English and will introduce students to the cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world through selected films, music and readings. In this interdisciplinary course, we will explore how filmmakers, musicians and writers respond to social and political changes in Angola, Brazil, Cabo Verde, Mozambique and Portugal. Topics covered include colonialism; postcolonialism; wars of independence in Africa; Brazil’s military dictatorship; Portugal´s New State dictatorship; evolving national identities; and representations of trauma and memory. Readings are in English and films have subtitles.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 256

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Igrejas

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 264
AFR 264/ ARTH 264 - African Art

As an introduction to the arts and architecture of Africa, this course explores the meaning and the contexts of production within a variety of religious and political systems found throughout the continent, from Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Mali, to name a few. We will consider important topics such as the ancient art outside the Nile Valley sphere, symbols of the power of royalty, and the aesthetic and spiritual differences in masquerade traditions. We will pay special attention to traditional visual representations in relation to contemporary African artists and art institutions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 264

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Greene

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 265
AFR 265/ ENG 265 - African American Autobiographies

This course traces the life stories of prominent African Americans, which, in their telling, have led to dramatic changes in the lives of African American people. Some were slaves; some were investigative journalists; some were novelists; and one is the president of the United States. We will examine the complex relationship between the community and the individual, the personal and the political and how these elements interact to form a unique African American person. The course also draws on related video presentations to dramatize these life stories. Authors include Linda Brent, Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells, Richard Wright, Maya Angelou, Malcolm X, and Barack Obama.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 265

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 271
AFR 271/ CAMS 271 - History of Slavery Thru Film

This course will examine the history of cinema through the lens of American slavery. Outside of the classroom much of what we know, or think about slavery derives often from popular media-particularly through film and television. Can Hollywood do the work of historians? Does historical interpretation through film serve as useful, beneficial, or detrimental? Can we make an argument for the historical efficacy of films? What is the difference between historical accuracy and historical authenticity? In examining these films, we will take into account the time period, location, and the political and social context in which they were created. We will see how much film tells us about slavery and, most importantly, what film might tell us about ourselves. Through a critical reading of a range of historical works, cultural critiques and primary sources, students will have a better comprehension of how historians and filmmakers both differ or find mutual agreement in their understanding of the past.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 271

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Jackson

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 292
AFR 292/ ARTH 292 - African Art & the Diaspora

We will investigate the transmission and transformation of African art and culture and their ongoing significant impact on the continent, in Europe, and in the Americas. This course explores the arts of primarily western and central Africa, including the communities of the Bakongo, Yoruba, and Mande, among many others. The influences of early European contact, the Middle Passage, colonialism, and postcolonialism have affected art production and modes of representation in Africa and the African Diaspora for centuries. Documentary and commercial films will assist in framing these representations. The study of contemporary art and artists throughout the African Diaspora will allow for a particularly intriguing examination of postmodern constructions of African identity.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 292

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Greene

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 295
AFR 295/ ENG 295 - The Harlem Renaissance

This is an exploration of the Harlem Renaissance, a movement of African American literature and culture of the early twentieth century, which encompassed all major art forms, including poetry, fiction, and drama, as well as music, the visual arts, cabaret, and political commentary. This movement corresponds with the publication of The New Negro anthology (1925). Literary authors we will study may include Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Wallace Thurman, and Richard Bruce Nugent. We will also enter into contemporary debates about “the color line” in this period of American history, reading some earlier work by W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, or James Weldon Johnson, in the context of early Jim Crow, the Great Migration, the Jazz Age, and transatlantic Modernism. Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 295

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 299
AFR 299 - Sem: Caribbean Culture

This course exposes students to the dynamic forms of Caribbean cultural expressions and the demographic diversity of its peoples.  Through a multidisciplinary lens, students shall explore major themes including identity, migration, language, religious expression, cultural expression including festivals, music and cuisine, the role of women, and Caribbean traditions of intellectualism. We will engage in critical examination of the history of slavery, colonialism and emancipation, as well as regional movements toward independence and unification and the contribution of the region to global development.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Fitzpatrick

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 302
AFR 302 - Caribbean Intellectual Thought

During the twentieth century the Anglophone Caribbean produced a rich body of ideas that had an enormous impact upon the colonial and postcolonial worlds. These ideas cover fields such as history, politics, economics, and culture. This course traces the development of these ideas, examines their applicability to the specific circumstances in the Caribbean, and analyzes how they resonated in the larger world of ideas. We will look at the works of writers and thinkers that could include: A.R.F. Webber, Marcus Garvey, Arthur Lewis, Eric Williams, C.L.R James, Amy Ashwood Garvey, Jamaica Kincaid, Patricia Mohammed, Erna Brodber, Cheddi Jagan, Walter Rodney, Maurice Bishop, and Michael Manley.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: One 200-level course of relevance to Africana Studies or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 303
AFR 303 - Seminar: Slavery and Film

This course will examine the history of black cinema through the lens of American slavery. The institution of slavery has had a profound impact on the United States and Atlantic World. Yet, it has not always been the easiest topic for public discussion. Outside of the classroom much of what we know, or think about American slavery derives often from popular media—particularly through film and television. Classics like Gone with the Wind, the television miniseries Roots, and even lesser known films such as Langston Hughes’ (screenwriter) Way Down South have done much to shape our perspective regarding how we remember and understand the slave system, the enslaved, its participants and politics. This course poses the following question: Can Hollywood do the work of historians?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: AFR 105 or AFR 206. Not open to students who have taken AFR 271.

Instructor: Carter-Jackson

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 304
AFR 304/ POL3 302 - Sem: Politics of Chocolates

Why is it that although the majority of cocoa is grown in Africa the most expensive chocolate is made in Europe? Why is it that the average cocoa farmer lives in poverty or earns just $2,000/year when the wealthiest chocolate and candy families are worth more than $10 billion? During the course of this semester, we will study the supply chain from natural resource extraction to final project and investigate the politics that allow for inequalities as well as the progress that has been made. Therefore, this course will examine the sociohistorical legacy of chocolate, with a delicious emphasis on the eating and appreciation of the so-called “food of the gods.” Interdisciplinary course readings will introduce the history of cacao cultivation, the present-day state of the global chocolate industry, the diverse cultural constructions surrounding chocolate, and the implications for chocolate’s future in terms of scientific study, international politics, alternative trade models, and the food movement. Assignments will address pressing real-world questions related to chocolate consumption, social justice, responsible development, honesty and the politics of representation in production and marketing, hierarchies of quality, and myths of purity.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: POL 330 2

Prerequisites: At least one Africana Studies or Political Science course.

Instructor: Dendere

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 306
AFR 306 - Urban Development & Underclass

Throughout the African Diaspora, economic change has resulted in the migration of large numbers of people to urban centers. This course explores the causes and consequences of urban growth and development, with special focus on the most disadvantaged cities. The course will draw on examples from the United States, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: One 200-level course of relevance to Africana Studies or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 310
AFR 310/ SOC 310 - Sem: Reading DuBois

This seminar examines various works of W.E.B. Du Bois within their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Although this course will pay special attention to Du Bois's literary endeavors, it will also examine his concept of race and color and his approaches to colonialism, civil rights, and politics. This seminar will examine The Souls of Black Folk, Darkwater, John Brown, The Autobiography of W.E.B. Du Bois, and The Suppression of the African Slave-Trade as well as some of his poems and other fiction.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: SOC 310

Prerequisites: One 200-level course of relevance to Africana Studies or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 312
AFR 312 - Sem: Natural Resources in Africa

This course examines key themes on the political economy of natural resources and development in sub-Saharan Africa. It considers the following questions: Why are resource-rich African countries often poor? Is the ‘paradox of plenty” real, or there are other alternative explanations that account for this phenomenon? What is the agency of African communities and governments in shaping outcomes with resource endowment? What are the antidotes to the resource curse? The course uses historical and theoretical analyses in African political economy to answer these questions in a holistic, multipronged manner, focusing on themes such as colonialism, post-colonial state-building, the ‘decade of development’, and Africa in the global system. It combines this with analyses of the governance of oil and diamonds, and case studies on how resource endowment has affected producer countries in different ways.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: AFR 263 or POL2 204, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Shingirai Taodzera

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 316
AFR 316/ ARTH 316 - Sem: Race & Gender Contemporary Art

This course charts past and present artistic mediations of racial, ethnic, and gendered experiences throughout the world, using the rubric of the body. In the struggle to understand the relation between self and other, artists have critically engaged with the images that define our common sense of belonging, ranging from a rejection of stereotypes to their appropriations, from the discovery of alternative histories to the rewriting of dominant narratives, from the concepts of difference to theories of diversity. The ultimate goal of the course is to find ways of adequately imagining and imaging various identities today. We will discuss socio-political discourses, including essentialism, structuralism, postmodernism, and post-colonialism and we will question the validity of such concepts as diaspora, nationalism, transnationalism, and identity in an era of global politics that celebrates the hybrid self.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 316

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or a 200-level ARTH course or a 200-level AFR course or a visual culture course.

Instructor: Greene

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

AFR 319
AFR 319/ PHIL 319 - Black Aesthetics

This course will explore how Black film (and Black art in general) raise questions about issues in Black political and Black feminist thought. For instance, what is the role of Black art in Black liberation? How do gender, race, class, and region affect portrayals of Black agency? How does colorism (or certain beauty ideals) affect Black women's lives? In what ways do Black spiritual traditions inform representations of Black life? To answer the questions, we will also revisit historical debates (such as those between W.E.B. De Bois and Alain Locke, and Zora Neale Hurston and Richard Wright) as well as analyze current work on representations of Black women in film such as Bessie, 12 Years A Slave, Hoodoo in America, Hidden Figures, and Fences. This course will also analyze and discuss concepts in philosophy of race, African American philosophy, and Black Feminist Philosophy that are relevant to those films.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 319

Prerequisites: At least one course in Philosophy, Africana Studies, or Women's and Gender Studies.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 330
AFR 330 - CSPW: Black Diaspora & Pandemic

The ongoing global pandemic and elections have revived conversations on race and the marginalization of the Black Diaspora. In this course, we will engage with the various ways in which black people practice politics in Africa and elsewhere in the diaspora. We will pay special attention to the ongoing impact of national politics on the global pandemic. Scholars taking the course will each week respond to a reading by writing public facing work such as blogs, editorials and/or opinion pieces, and other forms of public writing. A primary goal in this course is to learn how to bring academic arguments to the general public.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: At least one Africana Studies or Political Science course.

Instructor: Dendere

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 341
AFR 341 - Africans of the Diaspora

This course explores the nature and composition of the African Diaspora and its changing meanings. We will examine the sociocultural connections among diasporic Africans such as the forced migrations of enslaved Africans and voluntary emigration of Africans out of continental Africa. The seminar also explores the historical, religious, and cultural factors that foster distinctive diasporic African identities and how these people constitute and contribute to global citizenry.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One 200-level course of relevance to Africana Studies or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Fitzpatrick

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 345
AFR 345 - Enslaved Women in the Atlantic World

This course is intended to explore ways in which enslaved women engaged in local, national and international freedom struggles while simultaneously defining their identities as slaves, mothers, leaders, and workers. This course will pay special attention to the diversity of black women’s experiences and to the dominant images of black women in North America, the Caribbean and Brazil, but greater emphasis will be placed on the American experience. The course asks: What role did gender play in the establishment of slavery and racial hierarchy in the trans-Atlantic World? How did gender shape the experience of slavery for enslaved women and men and their masters?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: AFR 209 or AFR 105

Instructor: Carter-Jackson

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 350
AFR 350 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

AFR 350H
AFR 350H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

AFR 360
AFR 360 - Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

AFR 370
AFR 370 - Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: AFR 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

AFR 380
AFR 380 - Violence in the Black Atlantic

This course will examine the role of political violence in the form of riots, rebellions, and revolutions in the black Atlantic world. Together, we grapple with black liberation in the face of chattel slavery and white supremacy. We will spend considerable time examining the unfinished work of the American Revolution, the success of the Haitian Revolution, and the failed rebellions of the French Antilles. From there, we will examine how equality is obtained in post-emancipation societies. This course asks: What is a revolution? What makes revolutions revolutionary? What does failure mean? Is progressive change possible without the tools of war? In the last part of the course, we will focus on some recent and contemporary events that involve political violence and carry the potential to turn into a revolutionary process. In sum, this course reckons with the inseparable ideas of race, violence, and political power.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One 200-level course of relevance to Africana Studies or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Carter-Jackson

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 390
AFR 390 - Sem: Racism in the North

American slavery was a national crime. Every state in colonial America enslaved black people. However, the North’s profit from—indeed, dependence on—slavery has mostly been a shameful and well-kept secret. This course reveals the history of the slave trade and slavery in the American North. We grapple with New England in particular as we examine the lives of the enslaved people in places that feel incredibly “close to home.” From there, we will explore how after the Civil War, structural racism and white supremacy manifested in the policy, housing, education, and policing systems of northern cities and states. This course covers the false promises of the Great Migration and the myth of an equal North in the face of Jim Crow South. Ultimately, this class uses history to combat the idea that slavery and racism are regional.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. A course in African American History recommended (AFR 209 or AFR 210).

Instructor: Carter-Jackson

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: