SPAN 101
SPAN 101 - Elementary Spanish I

Introduction to spoken and written Spanish; stress on interactive approach. Extensive and varied activities, including oral presentations, cultural readings and recordings, and video program.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Arraiza Rivera, Hall, Staff

Typical Periods Offered: Summer; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Each semester of SPAN 101-SPAN 102 earns one unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

SPAN 102
SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II

Introduction to spoken and written Spanish; stress on interactive approach. Extensive and varied activities, including oral presentations, cultural readings and recordings, and video program.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: SPAN 101

Instructor: Arraiza Rivera, Hall, Staff

Typical Periods Offered: Summer; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Each semester of SPAN 101-SPAN 102 earns one unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

SPAN 201
SPAN 201 - Intermediate Spanish I

Intensive review of all language skills and introduction to the art, literature, and cultures of Spain and Latin America. Emphasis on oral and written expression and critical analysis.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: Two admission units in Spanish, SPAN 101-SPAN 102 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Bassa Vanrell (Coordinator), Hagimoto, Ramos, Selimovic, Vega

Typical Periods Offered: Summer; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Each semester of SPAN 201 and SPAN 202 earns one unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

SPAN 202
SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II

Intensive review of all language skills and introduction to the art, literature, and cultures of Spain and Latin America. Emphasis on oral and written expression and critical analysis.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: SPAN 201

Instructor: Bassa Vanrell (Coordinator), Hagimoto, Ramos, Vega

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Summer; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Each semester of SPAN 201 and SPAN 202 earns one unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

SPAN 241
SPAN 241 - Spanish Around the World

Practice in oral and written Spanish at the advanced level. Designed to enhance communicative competence, this course will provide an intensive review of advanced grammatical structures within cultural contexts of the Spanish-speaking world. Each section will explore a specific theme through the examination of Hispanic literary texts and the arts, as well as other cultural phenomena. Varied oral interactions, technological applications, and critical writing will be stressed.

Topics for Fall 2021:

Section 1:

Repression/Revolution and the Arts; Instructor: Renjilian-Burgy

In this course, short selections in prose and poetry manifest popular revolutionary responses to repressive regimes throughout the ages, in Hispanic nations. We will examine issues of race and ethnicity, gender, and socio-political/ economic conditions that have resulted in social change. Cinematographic, musical and artistic creations complement and corroborate themes of dictatorial governments, military violence, religious self-righteousness, and families fragmented by civil war.

We will study evolving national identities in Argentina, Chile, Cuba, El Salvador, Mexico and Spain. Particular focus will highlight deleterious discrimination towards Indigenous peoples. In addition to written responses, grammar review, exams and daily participation in class discussions, students will engage in collaborative projects.

Section 2: Latin American Culture and the Arts. Contemporary Perspectives; Instructor: Agosin

This course explores literary texts as well as visual images from Contemporary Latin America. We will study the interactions between these texts and the role they play in culture, politics, and society. Our goal will be to decipher, analyze and contextualize their enigmas and their messages to better understand the importance of Latin American culture in a globalized context. Special attention will be paid to the improvement of linguistic abilities and to the acquisition of fluidity in written and oral expression.

Section 3: Literature, Society and Politics; Instructor:Hall

Close readings of brief, groundbreaking fiction and essays that explore various forms of social injustice. We will study six authors from Spain, Argentina, Cuba, Colombia, Guatemala and Mexico who wrote during different historical periods, from the XVII century to the present. The selected texts feature  young protagonists and/ or narrators facing formidable obstacles while dreaming of a better society for themselves and others. Class discussions focus on the readings as well as current events from around the Spanish-speaking world. Students will visit Special Collections, complete an on-line review of grammar, and write several short essays.  

Topics for Spring 2022:

Section 1: Art with a Cause in Modern Spain: Ramos

Artists in Spain have a long tradition of confronting violence and injustice as well as raising awareness about pressing issues from the effect of wars in civilians to domestic abuse. This class will explore how modern Spanish artists have used their work to comment on and change minds about the thorniest matters of their time. Our analysis will range through many different forms of art, including painting, performance art, photography, graphic novels, film, and popular music.

Section 2: Repression, Revolution and the Arts; Instructor: Renjilian-Burgy

In this course, short selections in prose and poetry manifest popular revolutionary responses to repressive regimes throughout the ages, in Hispanic nations. We will examine issues of race and ethnicity, gender, and socio-political/ economic conditions that have resulted in social change. Cinematographic, musical and artistic creations complement and corroborate themes of dictatorial governments, military violence, religious self-righteousness, and families fragmented by civil war.

We will study evolving national identities in Argentina, Chile, Cuba, El Salvador, Mexico and Spain. Particular focus will highlight deleterious discrimination towards Indigenous peoples. In addition to written responses, grammar review, exams and daily participation in class discussions, students will engage in collaborative projects.

Section 3: Culture, Politics, and Creativity; Instructor: Selimovic

This course studies cultural expressions as invigorating glimpses into socio-political realities of Latin America and Spain. We will explore how writers, film directors, poets, and artists respond to social demands, political changes, and cultural shifts in particular times, places, and communities. Selected works engage students with diverse cultural repertoires of the Hispanic world in interdisciplinary ways. We will spotlight the relationship between political violence and literature in Argentina and Chile; displacement and photography in Spain and Uruguay; domestic workers and film in Mexico and Peru; education and artistic activism in El Salvador and Nicaragua; and exile and poetry in Cuba and Paraguay.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: SPAN 201, SPAN 202 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Agosin, Hall, Ramos,Renjilian-Burgy, Selimovic,

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

SPAN 243
SPAN 243 - Spanish for Heritage Learners

This course is for Heritage Learners of Spanish. Heritage Speakers have learned Spanish primarily as an immersion experience at home. Participants will improve their written and oral Spanish through the examination of cultural assumptions and values. Content is based on a variety of topics such as legends, differing historical perspectives, traditions, and others. The review of language structures and grammar will emerge from students’ language levels. Participants will read novels, short stories, plays, and essays. Students will examine multimedia illustrating experiences of Latinos/Hispanics in the United States. By the end of the semester, students will gain an understanding of how their culture influences language learning and how language learning affects their perspective of Latino/Hispanic culture. The course is conducted entirely in Spanish.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: For students who have learned Spanish primarily through an immersion experience abroad or at home.

Instructor: Arraiza Rivera

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

SPAN 244
SPAN 244 - Spain in the US: Past & Future

The legacy of Spain in the US is a complicated one. On the one hand, Spanish conquest and colonization had devastating effects on indigenous peoples of North America. On the other, Spain has had an extensive and lasting influence on American and Hispanic cultures, especially in the areas of language, religion, art, and architecture. Through a multidisciplinary approach, this class will explore the space that Spain has occupied in shaping America, from the early 16th century to today. It will also look ahead, as we try to envision what impact Spain will have on the US in the years to come. In order to understand the past, assess the present, and imagine the future, we will read chronicles from early Spanish explorers of North America, investigate Mission/Spanish revival architecture and painting, examine the testimonies of American travelers to Spain, and learn about social justice interventions of contemporary indigenous activists, including  attacks on statues linked to colonialism and slavery in the United States depicting prominent figures from Spain’s past.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242 or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Carlos Ramos

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course is also offered at the 300 level as SPAN 344 with additional assignments.

SPAN 245
SPAN 245 - Inventing the Americas

This course explores the mapping of the Americas from the pre-Columbian times until today through the study of the making of maps, both visual and conceptual, as well as of mapping space in literary works. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of the history of cartography and the notion of mapping in literature. Visual materials will range from maps drawn on sand, trees, cloth, and pottery from pre-Columbian societies, such as the Inca, the Aztec, and the Nazca; medieval, Renaissance, and contemporary maps and map art; and the most recent examples of mapping in scientifically "accurate" maps and Latin American city subway maps. We will read works by Christopher Columbus, Jorge Luis Borges, and Belén Gopegui, and view The Motorcycle Diaries.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: SPAN 241 or SPAN 242 or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Guzauskyte

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 246
SPAN 246 - Spanish Through Theatre

This class integrates the reading, studying and performing of some of the most important plays in Spanish Theatre. Students will learn about the Spanish theatrical tradition while developing their language and critical skills. In Spanish.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: SPAN 241 or SPAN 242 or functional equivalent. Not open to students who have taken THST 246.

Instructor: Ramos

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 248
MER 248/ SPAN 248 - Cordoba: City and Myth

Few cities are as imbued with history, culture and myth as is Cordoba in the south of Spain. As of 2018 it can boast even more UNESCO World Heritage Sites than any other city in the world. As “City of Three Cultures” it witnessed the convergence over centuries of the three main monotheistic religions, a commingling that, while unique in medieval civilization, was rarely completely harmonious and may have oftentimes been overly idealized. Print materials (including philosophical and literary production), recent educational media (including digital architectural reconstructions) and samples of dance and music will offer students the opportunity to see how cultural cross pollination resulted in significant and lasting contributions to the world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Crosslisted Courses: MER 248

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Carlos Vega

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

SPAN 250
SPAN 250 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

SPAN 250H
SPAN 250H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

SPAN 251
SPAN 251 - Youth in Argentine Fiction & Film

This course explores the construction of the child and adolescent voices in Argentine contemporary fiction and film. We will consider how young protagonists’ curiosities, trepidations, and transgressions in adult-regimented worlds have critical implications for class, gender, sexual and racial politics. Our discussions will center on diverse portrayals of children and adolescents as navigators of their settings, which range from shantytowns to country clubs, rural provinces to urban centers, homeless shelters to sheltered existences. Short stories, films, novels, and flash fiction by Ariel Magnus, Lucrecia Martel, Mariana Enríquez, Daniela Seggiaro, Paula Markovitch, Andrés Neuman, and Agustina Bazterrica will be considered.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Instructor: Inela Selimovic 

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

SPAN 252
SPAN 252 - The Making of Spain

A study of selected works, creators and historical events that shaped Spain's multiethnic and linguistically diverse identity from the 10th to the 17th centuries. Authors and topics explored in this class include El Cantar de Mío Cid, Alfonso X el Sabio and the Spain of the "three cultures", the poetry of Hebrew and Arabic Spain, the Reconquista, and the writing of American Chronicles, as well as some examples of the work of Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa, San Juan de la Cruz, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, and Calderón de la Barca.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242 or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Ramos, Vega

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 253
SPAN 253 - Latin American Short Story

A survey of the genre with in-depth analysis of works in Spanish by foundational writers Ricardo Palma, Rubén Darío, and Horacio Quiroga, as well as twentieth-century masters Jorge Luis Borges, Clarice Lispector, Julio Cortázar, Juan Rulfo, Carlos Fuentes, and Gabriel García Márquez, among others. Special attention to voices that have emerged since 2000, such as Mayra Santos (Puerto Rico), Rita Indiana Hernández (Dominican Republic), Edmundo Paz Soldán (Bolivia), and Roberto Bolaño (Chile/Mexico). Contemporary texts published in indigenous languages will be read in Spanish translation. We will explore themes of identity, memory, class, freedom, creative expression, myth-making, violence, mass media, race, education, women, children, and urban and rural life.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hall

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

SPAN 254
SPAN 254 - Spanish Literature Since 1936

A study of the struggle for self-expression in Franco's Spain and the transition from dictatorship to democracy. Special attention will be devoted to the literature of the Civil War and exile. The readings will include more recent explorations of the Spanish Civil War in literature, cinema and politics. Authors include Mercè Rodoreda, Carmen Laforet, Manuel Rivas, Alberto Méndez, Adelaida García Morales, and Víctor Erice.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Ramos

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 255
SPAN 255 - Chicano Literature

A survey of the major works of Chicano literature in the United States in the context of the Hispanic and American literary traditions. A study of the chronicles from Cabeza de Vaca to Padre Junípero Serra and musical forms such as corridos. A critical analysis of the themes and styles of contemporary writing. Works by Luis Valdez, Rodolfo Anaya, Tomás Rivera, Gloria Anzaldúa, Américo Paredes, Rosaura Sánchez, Jorge Ramos, and Rodolfo Gonzales.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Renjilian-Burgy

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 256
SPAN 256 - Culture & Conflict 19c. Spain

An exploration of nineteenth-century Spanish cultural production in correlation with the main struggles of the nation at the time. Works by Bécquer, Clarín, Goya, Jovellanos, Larra, Pardo Bazán, Pérez Galdós, and Unamuno, among others, are studied in their changing and sometimes turbulent aesthetic, social, and historical contexts. Some of the topics explored in this class include the tensions between tradition and reform, the Romantic versus Realist approach in art, how art confronted the frequent wars in the period, the role of the church in society, or the loss of empire and its effect on the intellectual life of the country.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Ramos

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 257
SPAN 257 - Contemporary Latin Amer Poetry

A study of the major twentieth-century poets of Latin America, focusing on literary movements and aesthetic representation. Poets to be examined include Vicente Huidobro, Gabriela Mistral, Octavio Paz, and César Vallejo.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Agosin

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 258
SPAN 258 - Barcelona and Modernity

The city of Barcelona offers a unique site to study Modernity, in both the Spanish and the global contexts. In the historical arena, the city has gone from political upheaval and anarchistic rebellions early in the century, to the fight against fascism, and finally to the struggle for democracy, nationhood, and more recently, independence. Students will learn about modernity and modernization in Spain in general and Barcelona in particular with special attention to Gaudí, Picasso, Miró, Mies van der Rohe, Sert, and Dalí in the historical, aesthetic, and philosophical context that inspired their works. Local reactions to the massive arrival of global tourists in recent years, as well as the current social and political tensions around the independence movement will also be explored. In Spain.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: One course above SPAN 241/SPAN 242. Application required.

Instructor: Ramos

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Winter

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Winter

Notes: This Wintersession trip course is not offered every year. Subject to Provost's Office approval.

SPAN 262
SPAN 262 - Intro to Spanish Poetry

An introductory overview of poetry written in Spain, focusing on how sentiment is expressed in language from the 15th to the 20th centuries. Traditional forms such as the copla, romance/ballad, the sonnet, and others evolve over time within the Iberian Peninsula. An ongoing theme will be the description and communication of desire and the enactment of gender. Together with anonymous traditional lyric from the Middle Ages and Renaissance, individual poets include Garcilaso de la Vega, Santa Teresa de Ávila, Francisco de Quevedo, Federico García Lorca, Concha Méndez, Luis Cernuda, Gloria Fuertes and Ana Merino.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Vega

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 263
SPAN 263 - Women's Art & Activism,LatinAm

Since the early 1970s, women in Latin America have been at the forefront of social justice initiatives and have held important leadership positions. Artistic expression has both informed and driven much of this activist engagement. Literature, film, textile arts, and painting are only a few dimensions of this dual agenda of artistic expression and insuring human rights. The course will examine key movements in Latin America-from the rejection of dictatorial regimes to a call for greater indigenous rights-paying particular attention to the role of women, both as individuals and as a group, in these movements.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Agosin

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 265
SPAN 265 - Latin American Cinema

This course will explore the history of Latin American cinema, from the early 1960s to the present. Different forms of cinematic expression will be explored: narrative film, the documentary, the cinema of exile, and others. Issues of national culture and identity, as well as cultural exchanges of films between Latin America and abroad, will be addressed. In addition to the films themselves, students will be required to read selected works on film criticism and several literary texts that have been made into films. Films to be examined may include Angelitos negros, México:Agua para chocolate,  Rojo amanecer, Novia que te vea, Roma; Argentina: Camila, Kamchatka, La historia oficial; Chile: El último traje, Machuca, Una mujer fantástica: El Salvador:  Voces inocentes: Colombia: María llena de gracia, Cuba: Memorias del subdesarrollo, Azúcar amarga,  Miel para Oshún. Documentary films may include Reportero, Cartas del otro lado, 911, Pedro Pan: Del otro lado del cristal, 90 Millas; La República Dominicana: Trópico de la sangre.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Renjilian-Burgy, Selimovic

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

SPAN 266
PORT 266/ SPAN 266 - Early Modern Iberian Lit & Culture

How did authors find new ways to think about the self in the Iberian Peninsula? How do their lives and works relate to the transformation of Spanish and Portuguese into global languages? This course constitutes an introduction to the literary and cultural production of Spain and Portugal from 1492 to 1681. We will discuss why the works of this period are considered "classics" and have an enduring impact in the Hispanic world. Analysis of key texts will be accompanied by samples of painting and music. Topics include: the importance of concepts such as love and honor in the private and public spheres, the role of ethnic identities and political processes in the representation of the Iberian modern subject, women writers, and self-representation through writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Crosslisted Courses: PORT 266

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Arraiza Rivera

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 267
SPAN 267 - Writer&Human Rights in Lat-Am

The role of the Latin American writer as witness and voice for the persecuted. Through key works of poetry and prose from the 1970s to the present, we will explore the ways in which literature depicts issues such as censorship and self-censorship; the writer as journalist; disappearances; exile; testimonial writing; gender and human rights; and testimonial narratives. The works of Benedetti, Timmerman, Alegría, and others will be studied.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Agosin

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not open to students who have taken SPAN 261.

SPAN 268
SPAN 268 - Contemporary Spanish Cinema

A survey of Spanish cinema. Themes of history and society as depicted by major directors since the Spanish Civil War of 1936. We will analyze films of important directors such as Pedro Almodóvar, Luis García Berlanga, Víctor Erice, Bigas Luna, Pilar Miró, and Itziar Bollaín.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Selimovic

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 269
SPAN 269 - The Caribbean Experience

An introduction to the major literary, historical, artistic and cultural traditions of the Caribbean. Attention will focus on the Spanish-speaking island countries: Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico. We will discuss such topics as slavery, independence, nation-building, race, gender, dictatorship, and immigration. We will use a variety of texts, films and artworks. Authors may include Juan Francisco Manzano, José Martí, Julia de Burgos, Alejo Carpentier, Nicolás Guillén, Nancy Morejón, Luis Palés Matos, Mayra Santos Febres and Junot Díaz.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hagimoto, Renjilian-Burgy

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

SPAN 271
SPAN 271 - Afro-Hisp & Indigenous Writrs

A close reading of selected texts that illustrate the intersection of African, Spanish, and indigenous oral and literary traditions. Readings include autobiographies, novels, and poetry. Authors to be studied may include Inca Garcilaso de la Vega, Rigoberta Menchú, Esteban Montejo, Luis Palés Matos, Nicolás Guillén, and Nancy Morejón. Topics include the emergence of non-elite voices, the relationship between identities and aesthetics, the marginal and the canonical, literature and the affirmation of the nation-state, and the uses of contemporary race and gender theory in literary analysis.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Guzauskyte

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 272
SPAN 272 - Understanding Modern Spain

A multidisciplinary introduction to contemporary Spain’s life and culture. Literary, historical, artistic, and anthropological readings will inform our understanding of recurrent themes in the construction and questioning of Spanish national identity and culture: Spain as a nexus of Christian, Jewish, and Islamic thought; centripetal vs. centrifugal forces; religion and class; long-term economic and cultural consequences of global empire; dictatorship and democracy. Attention will be paid to Portugal and to the diversity of languages and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Ramos

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

SPAN 273
LAST 273/ SPAN 273 - Latin American Civilization

An introduction to the multiple elements constituting Latin American culture. An examination of the principal characteristics of Spanish colonialism and Creole nationalism will inform our general understanding of Latin American culture today. Readings and class discussions will cover such topics as military and spiritual conquest, the Indian and African contributions, the emergence of criollo and mestizo discourses, and gender and race relations. Readings will include the works of Latin American writers, filmmakers, and historians.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: LAST 273

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Guzauskyte

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 274
SPAN 274 - Cervantes in Africa

Returning to Spain after military service in 1575, Miguel de Cervantes, author of Don Quixote, was captured by Barbary pirates and held in Algiers for five years. The resulting encounter with the multilingual, multicultural, and multifaith territories of North Africa-the theatre of two warring empires, the Ottoman and the Spanish-provided both challenge and opportunity for the writer. Against the backdrop of the Maghrib, this course will examine Cervantes' portrayals of the captives, clerics, corsairs, and émigrés that populated this fascinating frontier world. Cervantine texts in several genres-as well as cultural artifacts-will inform our inquiry into the mind and manner of this soldier/eyewitness turned writer, as we examine the religious, political, ethnic, and economic issues of Cervantes' Age.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Arraiza Rivera

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 275
LAST 275/ SPAN 275 - Making of Modern Lat Am Culture

An examination of the principal characteristics of the search for identity and independence of the emerging Latin American nations as expressed in literary, historical, and anthropological writing. We will examine the experience of each of four distinct regions: Mexico and Central America, the Caribbean, the Andean countries, and the Southern Cone. Readings will include the works of contemporary Latin American writers, filmmakers, and historians. Special attention will be given to the relationship between social issues and the evolution of literary form.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: LAST 275

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hagimoto, Selimovic

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 277
JWST 277/ SPAN 277 - Jewish Women Writers of Lat Am

This course will explore the vibrant literary culture of Jewish women writers of Latin America from the 1920s to the present. We will examine selected works by these authors, daughters of immigrants, whose various literary genres reveal the struggle with issues of identity, acculturation, and diasporic imagination. Writers include Alicia Steimberg of Argentina, Clarice Lispector of Brazil, and Margo Glantz of Mexico, as well as a new generation of writers who explore issues of multiculturalism and ethnicity.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: JWST 277

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242 or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Agosin

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 278
SPAN 278 - Writing Women: Earl-Mod. Spain

This course offers an introduction to the works of Spanish women authors ranging from the fifteenth century to the seventeenth. Topics include: the links between gender constructs and literary genres, representations of women's voices in early poetry, novels, letters and autobiography, rhetorical and artistic self-fashioning, and the analysis of women's access to writing, education, and socio-political institutions in early modern Spain. Texts by, among others, Teresa de Cartagena, Florencia Pinar, Teresa of Ávila, María de Zayas, Ana Caro, Hipólita de Narváez, Sor María de Ágreda and Sor Marcela de san Félix along artworks by Sofonisba Anguissola and Lavinia Fontana will be read and discussed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242 or equivalent (AP 5); Or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Antonio J. Arraiza-Rivera

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 279
SPAN 279 - Female Fashion Colonial Lat Am

In this interdisciplinary course, students will acquire a deep understanding of the colonial Latin American period, while learning to identify and interpret textiles, clothing items, and fashion movements. Focus on female garb in the 17th and 18th centuries Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia, and Mexico. Topics will include dress as a form of language, representation, and performance; morality, and sexuality; dress and politics. Materials will include primary and secondary sources; illustrations of clothing in printed and manuscript texts; textiles and clothing in museums, Special Collections, and digital collections; films and webcasts; and representations of clothing in various art forms and digital sources. Students will undertake a digital humanities project. Museum and Wellesley College Special Collections.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241, or placement by the department.

Instructor: Guzauskyte

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

SPAN 291
SPAN 291 - Women in Pre-Hisp & Colonial Lat Am

The course focuses on women’s literary expression and the roles women played in the societies of pre-Hispanic and colonial Latin America, ranging from serving as concubines and slaves to being recognized as key figures of leadership and prominent literary voices. The course will integrate writing by women with the ways in which women are depicted in visual and material culture, historical sources, and film. Authors to be studied may include Anacaona, la Malinche, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda, among others. In Spanish.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Guzauskyte

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

SPAN 293
SPAN 293 - 19th Century Latin America

An examination of the interweaving relationship between race and gender in the framework of nation building during Latin America's era of independence. Through literary, cultural, and historical studies, we will explore how the ideological trends that defined the fundamental characteristics of the nineteenth century continue to shape Latin American identities today.  A wide range of literary genres will be discussed (essays, novels, poems, and chronicles), as well as other cultural products, such as art, music, and film.  Topics covered include wars of independence, art and nationalism, anti-imperialism, the role of gender and sexuality in the national imagination, slavery and violence, and popular culture (e.g. folkloric music, dance, visual arts). Readings may cover texts by Simón Bolívar, Andrés Bello, Domingo F. Sarmiento, José Martí, José Enrique Rodó, Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, Clorinda Matto de Turner, and José de Alencar.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open to students who have completed SPAN 241 or SPAN 242  or equivalent (AP 5) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hagimoto

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

SPAN 299
SPAN 299 - Affect and Emotions

This course focuses on the tensions between affect and emotions in contemporary Latin American films and literary texts as terrains of sociopolitical and cultural critique. Focus on the works of Quiroga, Borges, Cortázar, Enríquez, Zambra, Bizzio, Valenzuela, Eltit, Valdés, Jodorowsky, Puenzo, Martel, Llosa, and Markovitch.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: SPAN 241/SPAN 242 and/or instructor's permission.

Instructor: Inela Selimovic

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 301
SPAN 301 - Sem: New Argentine Cinema

This course focuses on a burst of creative expression across different cinematic genres in Argentina from 1995 to the present. Renowned as the New Argentine Cinema (NAC), which continues to regenerate imaginatively, this aesthetic tendency has evolved and propagated its founders’ inimitable artistic and thematic explorations in unexpected ways. We will illuminate distinctive contributions to the formation and evolution of NAC, including those of Lucrecia Martel, Lisandro Alonso, Albertina Carri, Adrián Caetano, Martín Rejtman, and Pablo Trapero.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to junior and senior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Selimovic

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

SPAN 302
SPAN 302 - Don Quijote in the 21st Century

A close reading of the Quixote with particular emphasis on Cervantes' invention of the novel form: creation of character, comic genius, hero versus anti-hero, levels of reality and fantasy, and history versus fiction.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Arraiza Rivera

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

SPAN 303
SPAN 303 - Sem: Argentine Women Filmmakers

This course focuses on fundamental films by prominent contemporary Argentine women filmmakers. The course will highlight topics such as the construction and representation of gender in an industry primarily populated by males, gendered filmic storytelling, and the heretofore unheralded influence of women filmmakers on the New Argentine Cinema (NAC). Students will examine the inherent heterogeneity that informed changing sociopolitical and cultural contexts from 1995 onwards and how these realities were both represented in new media and, in turn, shaped and rendered more nuanced the social, political, economic and cultural realities of the period both in Argentina and other parts of Latin America.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Open to junior and senior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Selimovic

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

SPAN 305
SPAN 305 - Sem: Hispanic Lit in US

A study of U.S. Hispanic writers of the Southwest and East Coast from the Spanish colonial period to the present. Political, social, racial, and intellectual contexts of their times and shared inheritance will be explored. Consideration of the literary origins and methods of their craft. Authors may include: Cabeza de Vaca, Gaspar de Villagrá, José Villarreal, Lorna Dee Cervantes, José Martí, Uva Clavijo, Pedro Juan Soto, Miguel Algarín, and Edward Rivera.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Renjilian-Burgy

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

SPAN 307
SPAN 307 - Sem: Clthed/Naked Col Lat Amer

In this seminar, we will study the colonial period of Latin America, focusing on the cultural notions of “clothing” and “nakedness.” The course will be divided into three parts dedicated to Native American texts and art (mythologies, codices, maps); European texts (Bible, Aristotle, Montaigne); and accounts of the conquest told from various points of view (Columbus, Ixtlilxochitl, Cabeza de Vaca, Catalina de Erauso). We will analyze how clothing and nakedness were used to symbolize changing power relationships between various protagonists: indigenous/white, female/male, and colonized/colonizer. Topics will include: notions of dress in distinct cosmological systems, clothing and gender in early colonial chronicles, clothing and its absence in the construction of the individual, and collective notions of the Self and the Other.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Guzauskyte

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 308
SPAN 308 - Masculinities Med/Ren Spain

Analysis of how masculinity is constructed in key Spanish canonical texts of the period. Together with the “Don Juan” and the “rogue/trickster” (“el pícaro”)—two literary archetypes bequeathed by Spain to the world, models for defining aspects of manhood will include the battling hero, the saint, the villain, the “average guy,” and the philosopher. Emphasis will be placed on how these figures interact with and defined by interaction with women and how the un-enunciated queer is ever present. Together with examining how masculinity reflects notions of honor, virility, social order, religion, and misogyny, the course will consider medical and biological models of manhood and how those framed gender.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: SPAN 241 or higher, or by permission of instructor.

Instructor: Vega

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 309
SPAN 309 - Sem: Cuban Lit and Cul

This seminar examines Cuban literature and culture from the nineteenth century to the present. As a tropical island in the Caribbean ruled by numerous imperial powers and domestic tyrants, Cuba has often been perceived as a paradise and/or a prison. We will study both the literal and metaphorical meanings of these two symbols through various modes of cultural expression, including prose, poetry, art, music, and film. We will discuss such topics as colonialism, slavery, the independence movement, the Cuban Revolution, socialism, race and gender, immigration, and the changing relationship between Cuba and the United States. Readings may include texts by Juan Franciscano Manzano, José Martí, Cristina García, Fidel Castro, Ernesto “Che” Guevara, José Lezama Lima, Reinaldo Arenas, Yoani Sanchéz, and Sonia Rivera-Valdés.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hagimoto

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 310
PORT 310/ SPAN 310 - Sem:Foreign Affairs- Spain & Portugal

This course explores how early modern Spanish literature and other forms of cultural production (such as music, paintings and engravings), depict peoples and places perceived as foreign or other in relation to Spain's political dimension as a world power in sixteenth and seventeenth century Europe. Places like Italy and England or social groups such as Spain's moriscos appear in Golden Age literature in complex, often surprising ways. We will analyze the historical and cultural processes that inform such representations and also read how is Spain, and its dwellers, represented in contrast to people viewed as culturally and ethnically different in major works. Novels by Cervantes and María Zayas, plays by Calderón de la Barca, and poetry by Garcilaso and Camões will be discussed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Crosslisted Courses: PORT 310

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Arraiza Rivera

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 315
SPAN 315 - Sem: Luis Buñuel

Students will read the scripts and view the films most representative of alternative possibilities of freedom expressed by Luis Buñuel. The course will focus on the moral issues posed in his films and will start with a review of the historical motivations of the Buñuel perspective: Marxism, Freudianism, and Surrealism, as depicted in selected films of Buñuel, from his first, An Andalusian Dog (1928), to his last, That Obscure Object of Desire (1977).

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 318
SPAN 318 - Sem: Love & Desire Early Span Lit

Medieval Spain, at the nexus of the Christian, Jewish, and Islamic cultures, witnessed a flowering of literature dealing with the nature and depiction of love. This course will examine works from all three traditions, stressing the uses of symbolic language in the linguistic representation of physical desire. Texts will include Ibn Hazm, The Dove's Neck-Ring; the poetry of Yehuda Ha-Levi and Ben Sahl of Seville; the Mozarabic kharjas; the Galician cantigas de amigo; Juan Ruiz, The Book of Good Love; Diego de San Pedro, Cárcel de Amor; and Fernando de Rojas, La Celestina.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Vega

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 319
SPAN 319 - Sem:Creative Writng in Spanish

This course focuses on fundamental films by prominent contemporary Argentine women filmmakers. The course will highlight topics such as the construction and representation of gender in an industry primarily populated by males, gendered filmic storytelling, and the heretofore unheralded influence of women filmmakers on the New Argentine Cinema (NAC). Students will examine the inherent heterogeneity that informed changing sociopolitical and cultural contexts from 1995 onwards and how these realities were both represented in new media and, in turn, shaped and rendered more nuanced the social, political, economic and cultural realities of the period both in Argentina and other parts of Latin America.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites:

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Notes:

SPAN 321
SPAN 321 - Migr,Ident: LatAm&EastEur(Eng)

What do Pablo Neruda, Julio Cortázar, and Elena Poniatowska have in common, aside from being celebrated Latin American writers? All three were intimately connected to Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union: Neruda took his pen-name after the Czech writer Jan Neruda; Cortázar's lover, translator, and companion was the Lithuanian writer and diplomat Ugn? Karvelis; and Poniatowska's family heritage was Polish. This course explores themes such as displacement, belonging, heritage, memory, and identity, in the work of Latin American writers who negotiated their place in-between these two seemingly distant regions: Latin America and Eastern Europe. Readings by Neruda, Cortázar, Karvelis, Alejandra Pizarnik, Marjorie Agosin, Clarice and Elisa Lispector. In addition to writing a traditional final paper, students will present their research findings in the format of a digital humanities project.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to junior and senior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Guzauskyte

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 322
SPAN 322 - Sem: True Stories of Spain

This seminar will explore how contemporary Spanish writers, artists, and activists use various non-fiction forms to document personal experiences of love, loss, and identity, as well as important political, cultural, and social issues. We will investigate their creative uses of the personal essay, biography, memoir, autofiction, profiles, blogs, and longform journalism. In addition, we will examine visual, audio, and multi-media forms such as documentaries, podcasts, photography, and graphic novels. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which these examples of Creative nonfiction use the tools and techniques of fiction to develop material based on real personal experiences, public events, and cultural phenomena.  Students will have the opportunity to produce analytical as well as creative responses to the texts and topics covered in the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Carlos Ramos

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

SPAN 323
SPAN 323 - Sem: Modern Mexico

A study of post-Revolutionary Mexico through works by novelists, poets, essayists, artists, filmmakers, political leaders and public intellectuals who explore what it means to be modern. Topics include the history of one-party rule, the student movement of 1968, the 1985 earthquake, Zapatismo, women’s voices, the era of Insecurity, and migration. Special attention to issues around poverty and economic growth, the criminal justice system and public safety, climate change and sustainable development, the fight against racism and exclusion, political innovation, and US bilateral relations.  

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to junior and senior majors or by permission of the instructor. Not open to students who completed SPAN 281.

Instructor: Hall

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 324
SPAN 324 - Sem:Avantgard &Mdrnty in Spain

Using a wide variety of literary texts, paintings, movies, and architectural examples, this course will explore various forms of Modernity and Modernization in Spain, with a particular focus on its urban dimensions. Emphasis will be placed on the connections between Spanish and mainstream European Avant-Garde, as well as the marginalization of women's contributions. Main figures will include Federico García Lorca, Gómez de la Serna, Maruja Mallo, Vicente Huidobro, Gaudí, Rafael Alberti, Luis Buñuel, Concha Méndez, Ortega y Gasset, Clara Campoamor, Salvador Dalí, and Pablo Picasso. The connections between modernity and postmodernity will also be explored.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Ramos

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 325
SPAN 325 - Sem: Food in Latin Am Lit & Culture

An in-depth study of food in Latin American literature and culture, with a particular focus on its functions and symbolism in indigenous cultures and in the context of the transatlantic exchanges of food products, plants, animals, and recipes among the Americas, Europe, and Africa after 1492. We will also study the role of food and cuisine in the search for new literary forms of expression during the Latin American independence era and contemporary food times. Notions of food, kitchens, and hunger will be vehicles to explore issues of gender, race, power relations, slavery, and the emergence of new hybrid cultures. Readings will include Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo's Historia, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz' Respuesta, Francisco de Paula García Peláez' Libro del Chocolate, Fernando Ortiz' Contrapunteo cubano, and Laura Esquivel's Como agua para chocolate.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Guzauskyte

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

SPAN 326
SPAN 326 - Sem: García Lorca, 1898-1936

Federico García Lorca (1898-1936) embodies Spanish Modernity. While his innovative poetry and drama established him as a crucial figure in the twentieth-century Spanish cultural landscape, his brutal murder by Fascist supporters during the Civil War made of him a symbol of freedom lost. This seminar will study his artistic evolution: from his youth in Granada, and his studies in Madrid­-where he met and befriended filmmaker Luis Buñuel and painter Salvador Dalí-to his trip to New York and Latin America. The class will study his poetry, theatre, and essays, and also explore both the construction of the Lorca myth, and the period of cultural splendor that is encapsulated in his biographical dates: from the loss of the empire in 1898, to the beginning of the Civil War in the summer of 1936.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Ramos

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 327
SPAN 327 - Sem:Latin Amer. Women Writers

An examination of twentieth-century women writers from Latin America. Perspectives for analyses will include questions of identity (national, ethnic/racial, religious, sexual, gender), the extent to which Afro-Hispanic, Indigenous, and non-Christian writers constitute distinct, marginalized groups in Latin American literature, and a comparison of issues regarding identity in selected canonical and noncanonical works by Gabriela Mistral, Remedios Varo, Elena Poniatowska, Nancy Morejón, Rosario Aguilar, Gioconda Belli, and Victoria Ocampo.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Agosin

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

SPAN 328
SPAN 328 - Sem: 1000 Years of Dawn Poetry

An exploration of the symbolic uses of dawn songs - poetry composed to mark the arrival of the new day - in the Spanish poetic tradition, since its first manifestations in medieval times to its contemporary uses. From its origins, dawn poetry dramatizes the parting of lovers at daybreak, and by illuminating the conflict between private and public spheres, offers a privileged window into the fluid nature of poetic subjectivity. Modern dawn poems mark dawn as the juncture between night-and the world of private pleasures, dreams and desires-, and the arrival of the new day, with its routines, compromises and social pressures. This seminar will examine dawn poetry diachronically from two perspectives: literary criticism and cultural history.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to students in all classes who have completed SPAN 241.

Instructor: Ramos

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 329
SPAN 329 - Sem: Chile, Lit & the Arts

From 1971 to 2003, Chile, one of South America's longest democracies, has experienced traumatic cultural, political, and social change. From the election of Salvador Allende (1971—1973) through the Pinochet dictatorship, during these turbulent times an unprecedented cultural life was manifested in literature, theatre, and the visual arts. In this seminar, we will explore the cultural changes experienced in Chile during three decades, the ways in which writers understood the complex web of creativity, as well as the specter of censorship. We will analyze how historical figures were revived through writers such as Gabriela Mistral, Rosamel del Valle, Pablo Neruda, and Salvador Allende. Narratives, journalistic essays, and theatrical and visual productions will be examined vis-à-vis the social and political history in which the topics were created.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Agosin

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 335
SPAN 335 - Sem: Asia in Latin America

Connections between two geographically remote areas (Asia and Latin America) that would seem to have little in common will be studied. By analyzing prose, poetry, art, and music, we will examine diverse Asian influences in Latin American literature and culture from the nineteenth century to the present. We will explore how various images of the “exotic” Orient are represented in Latin America during the periods of “modernismo” and “vanguardia.” We will also examine contemporary Asian-Latin American writers and artists with an emphasis on the multicultural experience of immigration and assimilation. Authors may include Edward Said, José Martí, José Rizal, Rubén Darío, José Juan Tablada, Enrique Gómez Carrillo, Octavio Paz, Jorge Luis Borges, Cristina García, Anna Kazumi Stahl, José Watanabe, Siu Kam Wen, and Seiichi Higashide.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Open to senior and junior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hagimoto

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

SPAN 340
SPAN 340 - CSPW: Hisp Unity & Diversity

The Calderwood Seminar in Spanish prepares a Hispanist to articulate the unity and diversity of Hispanic cultures. Together with encouraging a reflective synthesis of the Spanish major itself, the seminar will hone public writing and speaking skills. Students will analyze traditional unifying concepts of identity including “Hispanic,” "Hispanicity," "Latino," and "La Raza," and the ideologies that underlie these terms. Participants will probe into how differences in race, ethnicity, geography, class, sexuality, religion, politics, and language do or do not favor pan-national identities.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Open to Junior or senior majors who have studied in a Spanish-speaking country (including experiential learning projects) or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Vega

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

SPAN 344
SPAN 344 - Spain in the US: Past & Future

The legacy of Spain in the US is a complicated one. On the one hand, Spanish conquest and colonization had devastating effects on indigenous peoples of North America. On the other, Spain has had an extensive and lasting influence on American and Hispanic cultures, especially in the areas of language, religion, art, and architecture. Through a multidisciplinary approach, this class will explore the space that Spain has occupied in shaping America, from the early 16th century to today. It will also look ahead, as we try to envision what impact Spain will have on the US in the years to come. In order to understand the past, assess the present, and imagine the future, we will read chronicles from early Spanish explorers of North America, investigate Mission/Spanish revival architecture and painting, examine the testimonies of American travelers to Spain, and learn about social justice interventions of contemporary indigenous activists, including  attacks on statues linked to colonialism and slavery in the United States depicting prominent figures from Spain’s past.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Open to junior and senior majors or by permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have taken SPAN 244.

Instructor: Carlos Ramos

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course is also offered at the 200 level as SPAN 244.

SPAN 350
SPAN 350 - Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

SPAN 350H
SPAN 350H - Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

SPAN 360
SPAN 360 - Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

SPAN 370
SPAN 370 - Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: SPAN 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

SPAN 377
JWST 377/ SPAN 377 - Jewish Women Writers of Lat Am

This course will explore the vibrant literary culture of Jewish women writers of Latin America from the 1920s to the present. We will examine selected works by these authors, daughters of immigrants, whose various literary genres reveal the struggle with issues of identity, acculturation, and diasporic imagination. Writers include Alicia Steimberg of Argentina, Clarice Lispector of Brazil, and Margo Glantz of Mexico, as well as a new generation of writers who explore issues of multiculturalism and ethnicity.

Students in SPAN 277/ SPAN 377 will all get the same material, but seminar-level students will have additional assignments, including formal presentations and longer writing and independent work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: JWST 377

Prerequisites: Open to junior and senior majors or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Agosin

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: