AFR 105
Introduction to the Black Experience

This course serves as the introductory offering in Africana Studies. It explores, in an interdisciplinary fashion, salient aspects of the Black experience, both ancient and modern, and at the local, national and international levels. This course provides an overview of many related themes, including slavery, Africanisms, gender, colonialism, civil rights, and pan-African exchange.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 46

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 115/ PHIL 115
Introduction to African American Philosophy

This course serves as an introduction to key themes and debates in African American philosophy. With an emphasis on concepts, arguments, and intellectual traditions, the course focuses on issues of resistance, liberation, and freedom. Drawing on history, literature, and film, we will consider questions such as: How do we define freedom in light of experiences of enslavement? Where does agency come from? How does resistance emerge within a context of oppression? How does gender inform our judgments regarding what counts as resistance? Authors covered include W. E. B. Du Bois, Zora Neale Hurston, Anna Julia Cooper, Angela Davis, Lewis Gordon, and Jose Medina.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 115

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Mandatory credit/non.

AFR 201
The African American Literary Tradition

A survey of the Afro-American experience as depicted in literature from the eighteenth century through the present. Study of various forms of literary expression including the short story, autobiography, literary criticism, poetry, drama, and essays as they have been used as vehicles of expression for Black writers during and since the slave experience.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 204
African Languages and Cultures

Taught in English, this course introduces students to the diversity and richness of African languages and cultures. The students learn about the historical, cultural, and linguistic contexts of African languages.In addition to providing a solid background to the study of African languages, the course introduces students to a linguistic phenomena not found in European and other non-African world languages.This course will stimulate the students awareness of African languages and show them what makes African languages so unique and fascinating. This is achieved by showing African languages in a relatively neutral manner, and to make the facts about African languages known to learners. Special attention is paid to the relevance of African languages and cultures to the geography, social and political organizations, and the linguistic landscape of the continent.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Geofred Osoro

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 206
African American History -1500 to Present

An introductory survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural development of African Americans from their African origins to the present. This course examines the foundations of the discipline of African American history, slavery, Africans in colonial America, migration, Reconstruction, and Harlem Renaissance artistry and scholarship.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Jackson

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 207
Images of Africana People Through the Cinema

An investigation of the social, political, and cultural aspects of development of Africana people through the viewing and analysis of films from Africa, Afro-America, Brazil, and the Caribbean. The class covers pre-colonial, colonial, and postcolonial experiences and responses of Africana people. Films shown will include Sugar Cane Alley, Zan Boko, and Sankofa.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 211
Introduction to African Literature

The development of African literature in English and in translation. Although special attention will be paid to the novels of Chinua Achebe, writers such as Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Camara Laye, Wole Soynika, Miriama Ba, Nawal El Saadawi, and Buchi Emecheta will also be considered. The influence of oral tradition on these writers' styles as well as the thematic links between them and writers of the Black awakening in America and the West Indies will be discussed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 212/ ENG 279
Black Women Writers

The Black woman writer's efforts to shape images of herself as Black, as women, and as an artist. The problem of literary authority for the Black woman writer, criteria for a Black woman's literary tradition, and the relation of Black feminism or "womanism" to the articulation of a distinctively Black and female literary aesthetic.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 279

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 213
Race Relations and Racial Inequality

This course examines the historical relationship between race and society in America. Through an examination of American's racial history, students will gain an appreciation of the country's evolution from overtly oppressive practices to its move toward social justice for all citizens, with emphasis on the plight of African-Americans. It will also interrogate the post-racial debate within the context of on-going challenges evident in racial profiling and institutionalized racism.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 215
Unpacking Blackness, Ethnicity and Identity in the African Diaspora

This course is designed to examine the meaning of race and ethnicity and the determinants and fluidity of membership in a particular racial or ethnic group. We will also explore different ways to measure ethnic and racial identification and how ethnicity affects attitudes, economic development, social mobilization and migration. We will seek to assess to what extent ethnic and racial identities shape trust and prejudice, and examine the impact of ethnic diversity on development and the provision of public goods. Analyses will be made of ethnic and racial electoral politics and the varying extent and impact of ethnic voting patterns in relation to democratic governance and ethnic conflict.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Chipo Dendere

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Notes:

AFR 217
The Black Family

This course is an overview of the African American family in economic, sociological, psychological, economic, anthropological, and historical perspective. It is an examination of the complex interplay of self-definitions, societal, and community definitions among African American women, men, and children within the context of their families. The course is also an exploration of changing gender roles among African American women and men.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 222
Blacks and Women in American Cinema

A study of the creation of images and their power to influence the reality of race and gender in the American experience. Viewing and analysis of American cinema as an artistic genre and as a vehicle through which cultural and social history are depicted.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 226
Environmental Justice, "Race," and Sustainable Development

An investigation of the extent to which the causes and consequences of environmental degradation are influenced by social inequality. The course will examine how the poor, indigenous peoples and people of color are subjected to environmental hazards. Topics include the link between negative environmental trends and social inequality; the social ecology of slums, ghettos, and shanty towns; the disproportionate exposure of some groups to pollutants, toxic chemicals, and carcinogens; dumping of hazardous waste in Africa and other Third World countries; and industrial threats to the ecology of small island states in the Caribbean. The course will evaluate Agenda 21, the international program of action from the Earth Summit designed to halt environmental degradation and promote sustainable development.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 228/ PHIL 228
Black Feminist Philosophy

Focusing on representations of black women in popular culture (including Beyonce's Lemonade), this course analyzes patterns of thought that define feminist African American culture today. Our focus will be how black women choose to represent, invent, and define themselves. The course will emphasize the intersection of sexuality and spirituality, employing the hoodoo woman, blues woman, diva, and fixer as categories of analysis. We will analyze how each of these figures demonstrate both agency and vulnerability, what function they serve in advancing black feminist ideals, and how they address or signal tensions within black communities. Authors studied include: Angela Davis, Alice Walker, Patricia Hill Collins, Zora Neale Hurston, bell hooks, Kristie Dotson, and Joy James.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 228

Prerequisites: Open to first year students who have taken one course in philosophy and to sophomores, juniors and seniors without prerequisite

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 234
Introduction to West Indian Literature

A survey of contemporary prose and poetry from the English-speaking West Indies. Special attention is paid to the development of this literary tradition in a historical-cultural context and in light of recent literary theories. Authors to include V.S. Naipaul, Derek Walcott, Wilson Harris, Jean Rhys, and others.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 236/ POL2 231
Introduction to African Politics

This course offers an introduction to contemporary African politics. The primary goal is to introduce students to the diversity of challenges and development issues facing African countries since independence. Questions motivating the course include: (1) Why state institutions weaker in African than in other developing regions? (2) What explains Africa's slow economic growth? (3) What can be done to improve political accountability on the continent? (4) Why have some African countries been plagued by high levels of political violence while others have not? 


In answering these questions, we will examine Africa’s historical experiences, its economic heritage, and the international context in which it is embedded.  At the same time, we will explore how Africans have responded to unique circumstances to shape their own political and economic situations.  


As we address the core themes of the course, we will draw on a wide range of academic disciplines, including political science, history, economics and anthropology. We will study particular events in particular African countries, but we will also examine broad patterns across countries and use social science concepts and methods to try to explain them. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: POL 2231

Prerequisites: This course was approved already, just asking for cross-listing.

Instructor: Chipo Dendere

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 239
Seminar: African Civilizations to 1700s

This course explores the historical landscape of Ancient Africa, with specific emphasis on its founding civilizations, politics, trade & commerce, culture and cosmologies. It serves to dispel the myth that the African continent was ahistorical, “dark” and primitive before European invasion in the 1400s. Through an interdisciplinary approach, the course encourages students to critically engage Africa from an Afro-centric perspective by examining its ancient kingdoms such as Egypt, Ghana, Mali, Songhay and Great Zimbabwe. It is anticipated that by studying these early civilizations and cultural formations, students will see Africa’s contribution and engagement in the global exchange of ideas and goods. Major themes include the political, economic and social impacts of European imperialism; the Atlantic Slave Trade; ‘Legitimate Trade’ and prelude to colonialism.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Fitzpatrick

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 242/ REL 214
New World Afro-Atlantic Religions

With readings, documentary films, discussions, and lectures, this course will examine the complex spiritual beliefs and expressions of peoples of African descent in Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica, and North America. The course surveys African diasporic religions such as Candomble, Santeria, Voodoo, Shango, and African American religions. Attention will be paid to how diasporic Africans practice religion for self-definition, community building, and sociocultural critique, and for reshaping the religious and cultural landscapes of the Americas.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: REL 214

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Fitzpatrick

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 243
The Black Church

This course examines the development of the Black Church and the complexities of black religious life in the United States. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course explores the religious life of African Americans from twin perspectives: 1) historical, theological dimensions, and 2) the cultural expression, particularly music and art. Special emphasis will be placed on gospel music, Womanist and Black Liberation theologies as forms of political action and responses to interpretations of race in the context of American religious pluralism.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Fitzpatrick

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 244
Women & Slavery in the Trans-Atlantic World

This course is intended to explore ways in which enslaved women engaged in local, national and international freedom struggles while simultaneously defining their identities as slaves, mothers, leaders and workers. This course will pay special attention to the diversity of Black women's experiences and to the dominant images of Black women in North America, the Caribbean and Brazil. The course asks: ‘What role did gender play in the establishment of slavery and racial hierarchy in the trans-Atlantic World? How did gender shape the experience of slavery for enslaved women and men and their masters?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Jackson

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 245/ POL3 245
The Impact of Globalization on Africa and the Caribbean

This course is designed to offer an inside look into the processes of globalization in Sub Saharan Africa and the Caribbean. This course will focus on the ways that international forces, the political economy and new technologies are affecting citizens and countries on the continent, as well as the way that African and Caribbean countries and actors are influencing the rest of the world.  We will explore a diverse set of topics including changing political landscapes,  digital & technological change and development, immigration, art and culture, foreign aid, and China’s role in Africa and the Caribbean. The course will attempt to highlight the new opportunities for citizens as well as the challenges that remain for African and Caribbean countries in the globalized world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: POL 3245

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Chipo Dendere

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 249
From Mumbet to Michelle Obama: Black Women's History

This course focuses on African American Women's history in the United States with certain aspects of black women's activism and leadership covered within the African Diaspora. The course is intended explore the ways in which these women engaged in local, national, and international freedom struggles while simultaneously defining their identities as wives, mothers, leaders, citizens, and workers. The course will pay special attention to the diversity of black women’s experiences and to the dominant images of black women in America from Mumbet (the first enslaved black woman to sue for her freedom and win) to contemporary issues of race, sex, and class in the Age of Obama. We will explore such questions as: What is black Women’s History? How does black women’s history add to our understanding of American history? Where should black women’s history go from here?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Jackson

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 255
The Black Woman Cross-Culturally: Gender Dynamics in the Africana World

This course uses a multidisciplinary approach to examine theories and socio-cultural analyses of the lives, experiences, challenges and contributions of Black women from a cross-cultural perspective. Case studies will examine gender theories and gender dynamics in North and South America, the Caribbean, Europe, Asia and Africa. The course will interrogate women's evolving positions and gender relations and analyze the legacies of slavery, colonialism, nationalism and liberation struggles within a post-slavery, post-colonial and post-modern context.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 256/ PORT 256
Cultures of the Portuguese-Speaking World through Film, Music and Fiction (In English)

This course is conducted in English and aims to introduce students to the cultures of the Portuguese-Speaking world through selected films, music and readings. By examining how contemporary film makers and writers present key aspects of African, Brazilian, and Portuguese societies, the following topics will be studied: colonialism; wars of independence in Africa; Brazil’s military dictatorship; Portugal´s New State dictatorship; representations of trauma and memory. Readings are in English and Films have subtitles.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 256

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Igrejas

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 261
History of Black American Cinema

This course examines the historical development of filmic representations of African Americans from The Birth of a Nation by Griffith; the first generation of Black American filmmakers such as Micheaux through the Civil Rights Movement and the Black Power Era; the new black culture of the 1970s and "blaxploitation" films; the Roots phenomenon; and the Black film renaissance of the 1980s including Spike Lee, Gordon Parks, and Julie Dash to the present. We explore changing and interlocking relationships of race and representation, class and color, gender and sexuality, and the media. We investigate 1) how media institutions shape and shift notions of race as a social construct and a lived reality, and 2) theorize the future of black American cinema as "post-racial" or otherwise.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Jackson

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 264/ ARTH 264
African Art: Powers, Passages, Performances

As an introduction to the arts and architecture of Africa, this course explores the meaning and the contexts of production within a variety of religious and political systems found throughout the continent, from Ethiopia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Mali, to name a few. We will consider important topics such as the ancient art outside the Nile Valley sphere, symbols of the power of royalty, and the aesthetic and spiritual differences in masquerade traditions. We will pay special attention to traditional visual representations in relation to contemporary African artists and art institutions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 264

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Greene

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 265/ ENG 265
African American Autobiographies

This course traces the life stories of prominent African Americans, which, in their telling, have led to dramatic changes in the lives of African American people. Some were slaves; some were investigative journalists; some were novelists; and one is the president of the United States. We will examine the complex relationship between the community and the individual, the personal and the political and how these elements interact to form a unique African American person. The course also draws on related video presentations to dramatize these life stories. Authors include Linda Brent, Frederick Douglass, Ida B. Wells, Richard Wright, Maya Angelou, Malcolm X, and Barack Obama.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 265

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 266
Black Drama

This course will examine twentieth-century Black drama, with a special emphasis on the period of its efflorescence during the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s. We will also explore the Black theatre as a medium of aesthetic expression and communal ritual as well as an instrument of political consciousness and social change. Playwrights will include Douglass Turner Ward, Alice Childress, Ossie Davis, Lorraine Hansberry, James Baldwin, Ed Bullins, Adrienne Kennedy, LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka), Ntozake Shange, and others.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 271/ CAMS 271
Understanding American Slavery Through Film

This course will examine the history of cinema through the lens of American slavery. Outside of the classroom much of what we know, or think about slavery derives often from popular media-particularly through film and television. Can Hollywood do the work of historians? Does historical interpretation through film serve as useful, beneficial, or detrimental? Can we make an argument for the historical efficacy of films? What is the difference between historical accuracy and historical authenticity? In examining these films, we will take into account the time period, location, and the political and social context in which they were created. We will see how much film tells us about slavery and, most importantly, what film might tell us about ourselves. Through a critical reading of a range of historical works, cultural critiques and primary sources, students will have a better comprehension of how historians and filmmakers both differ or find mutual agreement in their understanding of the past.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 271

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Jackson

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 292/ ARTH 292
African Art and the Diaspora: From Ancient Concepts to Postmodern Identities

We will investigate the transmission and transformation of African art and culture and their ongoing significant impact on the continent, in Europe, and in the Americas. This course explores the arts of primarily western and central Africa, including the communities of the Bakongo, Yoruba, and Mande, among many others. The influences of early European contact, the Middle Passage, colonialism, and postcolonialism have affected art production and modes of representation in Africa and the African Diaspora for centuries. Documentary and commercial films will assist in framing these representations. The study of contemporary art and artists throughout the African Diaspora will allow for a particularly intriguing examination of postmodern constructions of African identity.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 292

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Greene

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 295/ ENG 295
The Harlem Renaissance

This is an exploration of the Harlem Renaissance, a movement of African American literature and culture of the early twentieth century, which encompassed all major art forms, including poetry, fiction, and drama, as well as music, the visual arts, cabaret, and political commentary. This movement corresponds with the publication of The New Negro anthology (1925). Literary authors we will study may include Langston Hughes, Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen, Zora Neale Hurston, Wallace Thurman, and Richard Bruce Nugent. We will also enter into contemporary debates about “the color line” in this period of American history, reading some earlier work by W.E.B. Du Bois, Booker T. Washington, or James Weldon Johnson, in the context of early Jim Crow, the Great Migration, the Jazz Age, and transatlantic Modernism. Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement. Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 295

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Gonzalez

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 297
Medical Anthropology: A Comparative Study of Healing Systems

This course examines alternative healing systems that attempt to treat the whole person as a physical, social, and spiritual being and to promote community participation and healing. It offers new perspectives on the biomedical model as it examines the sociocultural context of the causes, diagnosis, prevention, and cure of disease. Examples of healing systems will be taken from Third World countries, particularly in Africa, the Caribbean, and Latin America, and from industrialized societies, particularly from African American and indigenous communities in the United States. Examination will be made of healing systems that include divination, herbal medicine, folk medicine, and faith healing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 299
Seminar: Caribbean Cultural Expressions and the Diaspora

This course exposes students to the dynamic forms of Caribbean cultural expressions and the demographic diversity of its peoples.  Through a multidisciplinary lens, students shall explore major themes including identity, migration, language, religious expression, cultural expression including festivals, music and cuisine, the role of women, and Caribbean traditions of intellectualism. We will engage in critical examination of the history of slavery, colonialism and emancipation, as well as regional movements toward independence and unification and the contribution of the region to global development.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Liseli Fitzpatrick

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 301
Seminar: South Africa

An examination of the degree of success or failure in social transformation from a racist, centralized, and oppressive apartheid system to a nonracial, democratic, and participatory system that seeks to promote social and economic justice for all its citizens. Topics include the structural challenges to social transformation; socioeconomic development and resource distribution; the persistence of de facto apartheid; the Truth and Reconciliation Commission; increasing poverty among the African population; the HIV/AIDS epidemic; the impact of globalization; and South Africa's place in Africa and the world at large.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: A 200-level course of relevance to Africana studies or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 306
Urban Development and the Underclass: Comparative Case Studies

Throughout the African Diaspora, economic change has resulted in the migration of large numbers of people to urban centers. This course explores the causes and consequences of urban growth and development, with special focus on the most disadvantaged cities. The course will draw on examples from the United States, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: One 200-level course of relevance to Africana Studies or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 310
Seminar: Reading Du Bois

This seminar examines various works of W.E.B. Du Bois within their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Although this course will pay special attention to Du Bois's literary endeavors, it will also examine his concept of race and color and his approaches to colonialism, civil rights, and politics. This seminar will examine The Souls of Black Folk, Darkwater, John Brown, The Autobiography of W.E.B. Du Bois, and The Suppression of the African Slave-Trade as well as some of his poems and other fiction.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: One 200-level course of relevance to Africana Studies or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AFR 316/ ARTH 316
Seminar: The Body: The Race and Gender in Modern and Contemporary Art

This course charts past and present artistic mediations of racial, ethnic, and gendered experiences throughout the world, using the rubric of the body. In the struggle to understand the relation between self and other, artists have critically engaged with the images that define our common sense of belonging, ranging from a rejection of stereotypes to their appropriations, from the discovery of alternative histories to the rewriting of dominant narratives, from the concepts of difference to theories of diversity. The ultimate goal of the course is to find ways of adequately imagining and imaging various identities today. We will discuss socio-political discourses, including essentialism, structuralism, postmodernism, and post-colonialism and we will question the validity of such concepts as diaspora, nationalism, transnationalism, and identity in an era of global politics that celebrates the hybrid self.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 316

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or a 300-level course in ARTH or a 300-level course in AFR or a visual culture course.

Instructor: Greene

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 318
Seminar: African Women, Social Transformation, and Empowerment

A comparative analysis of the role of women in development with emphasis on the struggle within struggle-the movement to achieve political and economic progress for Africa and its people and the struggle within that movement to address problems and issues that directly affect women. We will explore women's participation in social and political movements and ways to improve the status of women.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: One 200-level course of relevance to Africana studies or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AFR 319/ PHIL 319
Black Aesthetics: The Politics of Black Film

This course will explore how Black film (and Black art in general) raise questions about issues in Black political and Black feminist thought. For instance, what is the role of Black art in Black liberation? How do gender, race, class, and region affect portrayals of Black agency? How does colorism (or certain beauty ideals) affect Black women's lives? In what ways do Black spiritual traditions inform representations of Black life? To answer the questions, we will also revisit historical debates (such as those between W.E.B. De Bois and Alain Locke, and Zora Neale Hurston and Richard Wright) as well as analyze current work on representations of Black women in film such as Bessie, 12 Years A Slave, Hoodoo in America, Hidden Figures, and Fences. This course will also analyze and discuss concepts in philosophy of race, African American philosophy, and Black Feminist Philosophy that are relevant to those films.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: AFR 319

Prerequisites: At least one course in Philosophy, Africana Studies, or Women's and Gender Studies.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 320/ AMST 320
Seminar: Blackness in the American Literary Imagination

An examination of how blackness has been represented in the American and Caribbean imagination and how it shaped some of the seminal texts in American and Caribbean literature. Implicitly, the course will also examine the obverse of the question posed by Toni Morrison: "What parts do the invention and development of whiteness play in the construction of what is loosely described as 'American' literature?"

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 320

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Cudjoe

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AFR 341
Africans of the Diaspora

This course explores the nature and composition of the African Diaspora and its changing meanings. We will examine the sociocultural connections among diasporic Africans such as the forced migrations of enslaved Africans and voluntary emigration of Africans out of continental Africa. The seminar also explores the historical, religious, and cultural factors that foster distinctive diasporic African identities and how these people constitute and contribute to global citizenry.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One 200-level course of relevance to Africana studies or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Fitzpatrick

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AFR 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

AFR 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

AFR 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

AFR 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 2

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: AFR 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

AMST 101
Introduction to American Studies

An interdisciplinary examination of some of the varieties of American experience, aimed at developing a functional vocabulary for further work in American Studies or related fields. Along a brief review of American history, the course will direct its focus on important moments in that history, including the present, investigating each of them in relation to selected cultural, historical, artistic, and political events, figures, institutions, and texts. Course topics include intersectional ethnic and gender studies, consumption and popular culture, urban and suburban life, racial formation, and contemporary American culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: This course is required of American Studies majors and should be completed before the end of the junior year.

Instructor: Jeffries (Fall), Fisher (Spring)

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

AMST 116/ ENG 116
Asian American Fiction

At various times over the past century and a half, the American nation has welcomed, expelled, tolerated, interned, ignored, and celebrated immigrants from Asia and their descendants. This course examines the fictions produced in response to these experiences. Irony, humor, history, tragedy and mystery all find a place in Asian American literature. We will see the emergence of a self-conscious Asian American identity, as well as more recent transnational structures of feeling. We will read novels and short stories by writers including Jhumpa Lahiri, Ha Jin, Le Thi Diem Thuy, Maxine Hong Kingston, Chang-rae Lee, and Julie Otsuka. Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 40

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 116

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Lee (English)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AMST 117/ ENG 117
Musical Theater

What is musical theater, what are its boundaries and powers, what conversations are the great musicals having with one another, who creates it and who doesn't? We'll have those questions and others in mind as we look at some distinguished musicals of the last hundred years, most but not all American. Some possible works: The Merry Widow, Show Boat, Porgy and Bess, Threepenny Opera, The Wizard of Oz, Carousel, West Side Story, Candide, Sunday in the Park With George, Evita, Wicked, Once More With Feeling (the musical episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer),Caroline or Change, Fun Home, Hamilton. Opportunity for both critical and creative and performative work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 117

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Rosenwald

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AMST 120
Sport and Society

Commonplace understandings of sport tend to assign either entertainment or recreational value to participation and fandom. A closer look at competitive athletics reveals that sports tell us a great deal about ourselves and our society. Sports impacts the business world, community building and child socialization, and race, gender, and sexual politics. This course introduces the academic study of sport, covering a wide range of topics, including the origins of modern sport, the Olympics, college athletics and the NCAA, and social movements and protests. Students are encouraged to think critically about their own experiences and to follow current events and pop cultural debates about sports, in order to apply methods and theories from the readings to their everyday lives.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Jeffries

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AMST 151
The Asian American Experience

An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Asian Americans, the fastest-growing ethnic group in North America. Critical examination of different stages of their experience from "coolie labor" and the "yellow peril" to the "model minority" and struggles for identity; roots of Asian stereotypes; myth and reality of Asian women; prejudice against, among, and by Asians; and Asian contributions to a more pluralistic, tolerant, and just American society. Readings, films, lectures, and discussions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Clutario

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AMST 152
Race, Ethnicity, and Politics in America

The politics of race and ethnicity in America are constantly shifting, due to demographic, political, and economic transformations. However, fundamental questions about the nature of racial and ethnic divisions in America help frame the investigation of race and ethnicity across historical contexts. Some of the questions that will guide our discussions are: Are racial and ethnic hierarchies built into American political life? Are episodes and regimes of racial injustice the result of economic structure or a shameful absence of political will? How do gender and class influence our understandings of racial and ethnic categorization and inequality? To what extent is racial and ethnic identification a matter of personal choice?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Jeffries

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

AMST 161
Introduction to Latina/o Studies

Latinas/os in the United States have diverse histories, cultures, and identities, yet many people in the U.S. assume a commonality among Latina/o groups. What links exist between various Latina/o groups? What are the main differences or conflicts between them? How do constructions of Latina/o identities contend with the diversity of experiences? In this course, we will examine a variety of topics and theories pertinent to the field of Latina/o Studies, including immigration, language, politics, pan-ethnicity, civil rights, racialization, border studies, media and cultural representation, gender and sexuality, and transnationalism, among other issues.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AMST 212
Korean American Literature and Culture

What is Korean American Literature and what is the justification for setting it apart from the rest of Asian American literature? The course approaches this question by taking up a range of recent fictional writings, all of which were turned out by Korean Americans, between 1995 and 2017. Films on Korean Americans help us to look beyond literature to a wider cultural perspective. As the semester evolves we will continue to keep an eye on the range of styles, issues, and silences that characterize this field. Finally, we will take up the problem of language: the ways in which English is used to evoke a specifically Korean American idiom and the contrary process through which certain Korean American works reach beyond the "ethnic" designation and into the mainstream.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Widmer (East Asian Languages and Cultures)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 217
Latina/o Popular Music and Identity

This course focuses on Latin music in the United States from the 1940s to the present as a way to understand larger social forces that affect Latina/o communities. We will consider how music industries decide what counts as “Latin,” and how these processes intersect or fail to intersect with ideas of Latina/o identity on the ground. We explore social issues such as racial identity, immigration, gender and sexuality, transnationalism, and pan-ethnicity in connection with particular musical genres such as mambo, salsa, reggaetón, bachata, tejana, norteña, and artists including Willie Colón, Selena, Tego Calderón, Los Tigres del Norte, Shakira, and Aventura.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Rivera-Rideau

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 218/ REL 218
Religion in America

A study of the religions of Americans from the colonial period to the present. Special attention to the impact of religious beliefs and practices in the shaping of American culture and society. Representative readings from the spectrum of American religions including Aztecs and Conquistadors in New Spain, the Puritans, Jonathan Edwards and John Wesley, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Isaac Meyer Wise, Mary Baker Eddy, Dorothy Day, Black Elk, Martin Luther King, Jr., and contemporary Fundamentalists.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 218

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Marini

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 220/ SOC 220
Freedom: Great Debates on Liberty and Morality

Among the various challenges that face democratic societies committed to the ideal of pluralism and its representations in both individuals and institutions, is what is meant by the term "liberty". Among those who identify as conservative, the concept of liberty has over time been addressed in ways that seek to impose order on both individual and institutional behavior or what some conservatives refer to as "ordered liberty". Classical liberal views of liberty stress the removal of external constraints on human behavior as the key to maximizing individual agency, autonomy and selfhood. This course examines the historical and sociological debates and tensions surrounding different visions of liberty. Focus on case studies of contentious social issues that are at the center of public debates, including freedom of expression; race and ethnicity; criminality; sexuality; gender; social class, religion, and the war on drugs.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 220

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Cushman, Imber

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 222/ PSYC 222
Asian American Psychology

How can cultural values influence the way we process information, recall memories, or express emotion? What contributes to variations in parenting styles across cultures? How do experiences such as biculturalism, immigration, and racism affect mental health? This course will examine these questions with a specific focus on the cultural experiences of Asian Americans. Our aim is to understand how these experiences interact with basic psychological processes across the lifespan, with attention to both normative and pathological development.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 222

Prerequisites: PSYC 101, AMST 151, a score of 5 on the Psychology AP exam, or a score of 5, 6, or 7 on the Higher Level IB exam, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Chen

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 225/ SOC 225
Life in the Big City: Urban Studies and Policy

This course will introduce students to core readings in the field of urban studies. While the course will focus on cities in the United States, we will also look comparatively at the urban experience in Asia, Africa, and Latin America and cover debates on “global cities.” Topics will include the changing nature of community, social inequality, political power, socio-spatial change, technological change, and the relationship between the built environment and human behavior. We will examine the key theoretical paradigms driving this field since its inception, assess how and why they have changed over time, and discuss the implications of these shifts for urban scholarship and social policy. The course will include fieldwork in Boston and presentations by city government practitioners.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 225

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Kaliner

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AMST 228/ REL 220
Religious Themes in American Fiction

Human nature and destiny, good and evil, love and hate, loyalty and betrayal, tradition and assimilation, salvation and damnation, God and fate in the The Scarlet Letter, Moby-Dick, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and contemporary novels including Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, Rudolfo Anaya’s Bless Me, Ultima, Allegra Goodman’s Kaaterskill Falls, and Tommy Orange’s There There. Reading and discussion of these texts as expressions of the diverse religious cultures of nineteenth- and twentieth-century America.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 228

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Marini

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AMST 231/ FREN 231
Americans in Paris: Race, Gender and Sexuality in the City of Light (in English)

With a spring-break onsite visit to Paris included in the course, students will experience firsthand how, for more than two hundred years, the experiences of Americans in Paris have exerted an outsized influence on American, French, and global culture. These transnational encounters have included writers and artists as well as diplomats, students, filmmakers, jazz musicians, bohemians and tourists. Drawing on a variety of historical and literary documents, among them novels and essays, along with films and music, we will trace the history of American encounters with Paris from the late eighteenth century to the present day. Through our exploration in class and in Paris itself, we will study the city as a long-running site of complex cultural encounters, a creative and dynamic metropolis with special significance to many different groups, among them, African Americans, women, and queer people, who have made this city a hotbed of intellectual innovation and social change.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 231

Prerequisites: None. Permission of instructors. Interview required.

Instructor: Datta, Fisher

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 232
Asian American Popular Culture

This course analyzes the significance of Asian American pop culture. We will investigate cultural constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, class, and sexuality through an examination of various kinds of popular media, including film, music, performance, social media, and art. We will read key works in cultural studies alongside transnational feminist works. Central to this course will be an examination of how popular culture can reproduce and challenge racial, sexual, gender, class, and national identity formations in the United States.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Genevieve Clutario

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AMST 235
From Zumba to Taco Trucks: Consuming Latina/o Cultures

From the Zumba Fitness Program to Jane the Virgin, salsa night to the ubiquitous taco truck, “Latin” culture is popular. But what do we make of the popularity of “Latin” culture at a time when many Latina/o communities face larger systemic inequalities related to issues such as race, ethnicity, or immigration status? How do organizations and industries represent and market Latinidad to the US public, and how do these forms of popular culture and representation influence our perceptions of Latina/o life in the United States? How do Latina/o consumers view these representations? This course explores these questions through a critical examination of the representation and marketing of Latinidad, or Latina/o identities, in US popular culture. We will pay particular attention to the intersections between Latina/o identities, ideas of “Americanness,” immigration, race, gender, and sexuality in the United States.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Rivera-Rideau

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 240/ ENG 269
The Rise of an American Empire: Wealth and Conflict in the Gilded Age

An interdisciplinary exploration of the so-called Gilded Age and the Progressive era in the United States between the Civil War and World War I, emphasizing both the conflicts and achievements of the period. Topics will include Reconstruction and African American experience in the South; technological development and industrial expansion; the exploitation of the West and resistance by Native Americans and Latinos; feminism, "New Women," and divorce; tycoons, workers, and the rich-poor divide; immigration from Europe, Asia, and new American overseas possessions; as well as a vibrant period of American art, architecture, literature, music, and material culture, to be studied by means of the rich cultural resources of the Boston area.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 269

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Fisher

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AMST 241/ SOC 241
A Nation in Therapy

What is therapy? Although historically tied to the values and goals of medicine, the roles that therapy and therapeutic culture play in defining life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness are now ubiquitous. The impact of therapeutic culture on every major social institution, including the family, education, and the law, has created a steady stream of controversy about the ways in which Americans in particular make judgements about right and wrong, about others, and about themselves. Are Americans obsessed with their well being? Is there a type of humor specific to therapeutic culture? This course provides a broad survey of the triumph of the therapeutic and the insights into the character and culture that triumph reveals.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 241

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Imber

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 246/ SOC 246
U.S. Immigration

We live in a world on the move. Nearly one out of every seven people in the world today is an international or internal migrant who moves voluntary or by force. In the United States, immigrants and their children make up nearly 25 percent of the population. This course looks at migration to the United States from a transnational perspective and then looks comparatively at other countries of settlement. We use Framingham as a lab for exploring race and ethnicity, immigration incorporation, and transnational practices. Fieldwork projects will examine how immigrants affect the economy, politics, and religion and how the town is changing in response. We will also track contemporary debates around immigration policy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 246

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Levitt

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AMST 251/ SOC 251
Racial Regimes in the United States and Beyond

How can we understand the mechanisms and effects of racial domination in our society? In this class, we develop a sociological understanding of race through historical study of four racial regimes in the United States: slavery, empire, segregation, and the carceral state. We relate the U.S. experience to racial regimes in other parts of the world, including British colonialism, the Jewish ghetto in Renaissance Venice, and apartheid and post-apartheid states in South Africa, among other contexts. Thus, we develop a comparative, global understanding of race and power. We conclude with a hands-on group media project engaging a relevant contemporary issue.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 251

Prerequisites: At least one social science course required.

Instructor: Radhakrishnan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 258/ ENG 258
Gotham: New York City in Literature, Art, and Film

This course examines that icon of modernity, New York City, as it appears in literature, art, and film. We'll cross neighborhoods and centuries to consider how Americans have variously envisioned this cultural and financial capital. We'll also consider how each imagining of the city returns us to crucial questions of perspective, identity, and ownership. How does the city become legible to its inhabitants, and how do readings of the city vary according to one's physical, cultural, and social position in it? Authors may include: Walt Whitman, Herman Melville, Edith Wharton, Anzia Yezierska, Ralph Ellison, Paule Marshall, Chang-rae Lee, Teju Cole, and Colson Whitehead. Artists include, among others, John Sloan, Helen Levitt and Berenice Abbott; filmmakers Vincente Minnelli, Martin Scorsese, and Spike Lee.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 258

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Brogan

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AMST 261/ ENG 261
Hollywood from Vietnam to Reagan

Between the breakdown of the studio system and the advent of the blockbuster era, American filmmaking enjoyed a decade of extraordinary achievement. We'll study a range of great films produced in the late 60s and 70s, such as Bonnie and Clyde, Taxi Driver, The Godfather, Chinatown, Annie Hall, Shampoo, Carrie, and Apocalypse Now, exploring their distinctive combination of American genre and European art-film style, and connecting them to the social and political contexts of this turbulent moment in American history.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 261

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Vernon Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AMST 262/ ENG 262
American Literature to 1865

This is the greatest, most thrilling and inspiring period in American literary history, and the central theme represented and explored in it is freedom, and its relationship to power. Power and freedom—the charged and complex dynamics of these intersecting terms, ideas, and conflicted realities: we will examine this theme in literature, religion, social reform, sexual and racial liberation, and more. Authors to be studied will include Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Douglass, Stowe, Henry James. We will enrich our work by studying films dealing with the period—for example, Edward Zwick’s Glory (1989), about one of the first regiments of African-American troops, and Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln (2012).; and we also will consider the visual arts—photography and American landscape painting. The literature that we will read and respond to in this course was written 150 years ago, but the issues that these writers engage are totally relevant to who we are and where we are today. In important ways this is really a course in contemporary American literature.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 262

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cain

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 264
Histories of Asian American Labor and Immigration

This course offers an introduction to the history of Asian American labor and immigration from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. Using a range of interdisciplinary frameworks and sources, the course will focus on the flow and movement of people to the United States, we will nonetheless pay special attention to the global, transnational and transpacific networks, issues, events and moments that have historically impacted the movement of peoples around the world. This course also spotlights the ways in which labor played a central role in shaping these migratory flows and experiences. As much as possible, this course will aim to look at historical events and moments from the perspective of ordinary people, or “histories from below,” in order to understand how historical narratives may change when you are not looking at histories from the perspective of those in power.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Genevieve Clutario

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AMST 266/ ENG 266
American Literature from the Civil War to the 1930s

Topic for 2019-20: From Page to Screen: American Novels and Films

Topic for 2019-20: From Page to Screen: American Novels and Films

This course will focus on important Americans novels from the late nineteenth century to the mid-twentieth century, and the attempts (sometimes successful, sometimes not, but always interesting) to turn them into movies, translating them from the page to the screen. Authors to be studied will include Henry James, Willa Cather, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Carson McCullers, and Edith Wharton. For comparison and contrast, we will move beyond the chronology of the course to consider books by two more recent authors, Malcolm X and Patricia Highsmith. Perhaps the main question we will ask is this: Is it possible to turn a great book, especially a great novel, into a great or even a good movie?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 266

Instructor: Cain

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AMST 268/ ENG 268
American Literature Now: The Twenty-First Century

This course will explore the richness and diversity of American (and some Canadian) writing since 2000, focusing primarily on writers who have emerged in the new century.  We’ll read novels and short stories by both established authors, such as Jennifer Egan and Colson Whitehead, and rising talents like Ben Lerner and Jenny Offill.  We’ll also look at the work of some experimental writers, such as Lydia Davis and Percival Everett, and some examples of the genre fiction against which literary writing has defined itself, like Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight, to think about the ways that intellectual and cultural prestige are established in contemporary America.  Given that MFA programs have become a defining feature of the literary landscape in the US, we’ll examine some of the controversies around the spread of these programs through excerpts from recent treatments like Mark McGurl’s The Program Era and Chad Harbach’s MFA vs. NYC.  And we’ll dip into the occasionally bitter rivalries and feuds that have shaped understandings of the contemporary literary scene: Jonathan Franzen vs. Oprah, Franzen vs. Jennifer Weiner, Francine Prose vs. Sadia Shepard.  Studying these conflicts will help illuminate the terrain of literary and cultural values within which contemporary American literature is written, read, and discussed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 268

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Shetley

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 271/ ENG 281
American Drama and Musical Theater

Study of some distinguished twentieth-century American plays, theatre pieces, and musicals. Possible musicals: The Cradle Will Rock, Showboat, West Side Story, A Chorus Line, Into the Woods, Chicago. Possible playwrights and ensembles: Eugene O'Neill, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams, Lorraine Hansberry, the Bread and Puppet Theatre, the Teatro Campesino, María Irene Fornés, August Wilson, David Henry Hwang, Tony Kushner, Anna Deveare Smith. Focus on close reading, on historical and social context, on realism and the alternatives to realism, on the relations between text and performance. Opportunities both for performance and for critical writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 271

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 274/ WGST 274
Rainbow Cowboys (and Girls): Gender, Race, Class, and Sexuality in Westerns

Westerns, a complex category that includes not only films but also novels, photographs, paintings, and many forms of popular culture, have articulated crucial mythologies of American culture from the nineteenth century to the present. From Theodore Roosevelt to the Lone Ranger, myths of the Trans-Mississippi West have asserted iconic definitions of American masculinity and rugged individualism. Yet as a flexible, ever-changing genre, Westerns have challenged, revised, and subverted American concepts of gender and sexuality. Westerns have also struggled to explain a dynamic and conflictive "borderlands" among Native Americans, Anglos, Latinos, Blacks, and Asians. This team-taught, interdisciplinary course will investigate Westerns in multiple forms, studying their representations of the diverse spaces and places of the American West and its rich, complicated, and debated history.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 274

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Creef, Fisher (American Studies)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AMST 281/ ENG 297
Rainbow Republic: American Queer Culture from Walt Whitman to Lady Gaga

Transgender rights, gay marriage, and Hollywood and sports figures' media advocacy are only the latest manifestations of the rich queer history of the United States. This course will explore American LGBTQ history and culture from the late nineteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on consequential developments in society, politics, and consciousness since Stonewall in 1969. The course will introduce some elements of gender and queer theory; it will address historical and present-day constructions of sexuality through selected historical readings but primarily through the vibrant cultural forms produced by queer artists and communities. The course will survey significant queer literature, art, film, and popular culture, with an emphasis on the inventive new forms of recent decades. It will also emphasize the rich diversity of queer culture especially through the intersectionality of gender and sexuality with class, ethnicity and race.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 297

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Fisher

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 290
Afro-Latinas/os in the U.S.

This course examines the experiences and cultures of Afro-Latinas/os, people of both African and Latin American descent, in the United States. We will consider how blackness intersects with Latina/o identity, using social movements, politics, popular culture, and literature as the bases of our analysis. This course addresses these questions transnationally, taking into account not only racial dynamics within the United States, but also the influence of dominant Latin American understandings of race and national identity. We will consider the social constructions of blackness and Latinidad; the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality in the Latina/o community; immigration and racial politics; representations of Afro-Latinas/os in film, music, and literature; and African American-Latino relations.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Rivera-Rideau

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 296/ ENG 296
Diaspora and Immigration in 21st-Century American Literature

This course explores the exciting new literature produced by writers transplanted to the United States or by children of recent immigrants. We'll consider how the perspectives of recent immigrants redefine what is American by sustaining linkages across national borders, and we'll examine issues of hybrid identity and multiple allegiances, collective memory, traumatic history, nation, home and homeland, and globalization. Our course materials include novels, essays, memoirs, and films. We'll be looking at writers in the United States with cultural connections to China, Egypt, Nigeria, Dominican Republic, India, Greece, Viet Nam, Bosnia, Ethiopia, and Japan. Some authors to be included: André Aciman, Chimamanda Adichie, Junot Díaz, Kiran Desai, Jeffrey Eugenides, Aleksandar Hemon, Lê Thi Diem Thúy, Dinaw Mengestu, and Julie Otsuka. Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 296

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Brogan

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AMST 299/ ENG 299
American Nightmares: The Horror Film in America

An exploration of the horror film in America, from the early sound era to the present, with particular attention to the ways that imaginary monsters embody real terrors, and the impact of social and technological change on the stories through which we provoke and assuage our fears. We'll study classics of the genre, such as Frankenstein, Cat People, Night of the Living Dead, and The Exorcist, as well as contemporary films like Get Out, and read some of the most important work in the rich tradition of critical and theoretical writing on horror.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 299

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 310
Asian/American Cultures of Beauty

This course examines historical and contemporary contexts and processes of defining Asian/American beauty as well as the ways in which beauty is used to manage bodies, define social hierarchies, and gain or maintain power. Moreover, this course asks how presentations of beauty, especially “beautiful bodies,” could also be used as forms of subversion and resistance. Looking at sites such beauty pageants, cosmetic consumer cultures, drag performances, cosmetic surgery, and the transnational production and consumption of beauty influencers we will investigate how race, gender, sexuality, and class informs definitions of beauty and how definitions of beauty inform constructions of race, gender, sexuality, and class.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: AMST 101 or AMST 151 recommended.

Instructor: Genevieve Clutario

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AMST 315
Beats, Rhymes, and Life: Hip-Hop Studies

This course offers an intensive exploration of hip-hop studies where students learn about the history of hip-hop as a social movement and art form composed of the following four elements: DJing, MCing, break dancing, and graffiti art. Once a common understanding of hip-hop's genesis and history is established, attention is turned to how hip-hop is studied in the academy. The seminar features a wide range of interdisciplinary studies of hip-hop music and culture in order to demonstrate the different methodological and theoretical frames used in hip-hop scholarship. We focus on hip-hop-related debates and discussions in popular culture, such as racial authenticity, global consumption of hip-hop, sampling and musical technologies, and sexism and gender scripts within hip-hop culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Preference given to American Studies majors and juniors and seniors.

Instructor: Jeffries

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

AMST 317
Seminar: The Real Barack Obama

This course examines Barack Obama, first, as a viable public intellectual who intervenes on discussions of race, religion, and other hot-button topics, and second, as a cultural phenomenon and symbol of significant social import. Students will critically engage Obama's writings and speaking, including his biography, sense of identity, and political philosophy. We will move to the events of his presidential campaign to understand his electoral victory, examining representations of Obama during and after the 2008 and 2012 elections. Instead of only situating President Obama in American history, or giving his supporters a platform to celebrate his ascendance, this seminar will ask students to unpack that ascendancy over the past eight years and to engage the broader discourses that make him a political and cultural lightning rod.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Instructor: Jeffries

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

AMST 318/ REL 318
Seminar: Interning the "Enemy Race": Japanese Americans in World War II

A close examination of the rationale by the U.S. government for the incarceration of American citizens of Japanese ancestry, and Japanese nationals living in the United States and Latin America, after Japan's attack in December 1941 of Pearl Harbor. The course also examines the dynamics of overwhelming popular support for the incarceration, as well as the aftermath of the internment. The topics include Japan's rise as a colonial power, starting in the late nineteenth century; the place of Asian migrant workers and the "yellow peril"; life in the camps; the formation of the Japanese American Citizens League; the valor of the Japanese American soldiers in Europe during World War II; how the United States has since responded to its "enemies," especially after 9/11; changing immigration laws; race and politics in America.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: REL 318

Prerequisites: One course in Asian American Studies, or in Asian Religions, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Kodera

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

AMST 319/ REL 319
Seminar: Religion, Law, and Politics in America

A study of the relationships among religion, fundamental law, and political culture in the American experience. Topics include established religion in the British colonies, religious ideologies in the American Revolution, religion and rebellion in the Civil War crisis, American civil religion, and the New Religious Right. Special attention to the separation of church and state, selected Supreme Court cases on the religion clauses of the First Amendment, and religious and moral issues in current American politics.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 319

Prerequisites: REL 200, REL 217, REL 218, or at least one 200-level unit in American Studies or in American history, sociology, or politics; or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Marini

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 325
Puerto Ricans at Home and Beyond: Popular Culture, Race, and Latino/a Identities in Puerto Rico and the U.S.

Puerto Rico has been a territory of the United States since 1898, and yet it holds a very different view of race relations. Dominant discourses of Puerto Rican identity represent the island as racially mixed and therefore devoid of racism; but many scholars argue that this is not the case. We will use popular culture, memoir, and political histories as lenses through which to examine the construction of race, and blackness in particular, in Puerto Rico and among Puerto Ricans in the US. We will explore topics such as the role of Puerto Rican activists in social movements for racial equality, performances of blackness and Puerto Ricanness in hip-hop and reggaeton, and migration's influence on ideas of blackness and Latinidad in both Puerto Rico and the U.S.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: AMST 101 or permission of the instructor

Instructor: Rivera-Rideau

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 327
New Directions in Black and Latina Feminisms: Beyoncé, J-Lo, and Other Divas?

This course uses Black and Latina feminist theories to critically examine the performances, personas, and representations of Beyoncé Knowles and Jennifer López. We will begin with an overview of classic Black and Latina feminist theory texts by authors such as Audre Lorde, bell hooks, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Cherríe Moraga. We will then read more contemporary Black and Latina feminist academic and popular works that expand, challenge, and complicate these theories. Throughout the course, we will put these texts in conversation with Beyoncé and Jennifer López, as well as other Black and Latina artists. In addition to the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality, topics include performance, fashion and beauty, colorism, motherhood, sex and pleasure, and the politics of representation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Previous experience with feminist or race theory helpful.

Instructor: Rivera-Rideau

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 340/ ARTH 340
Seminar: Disneyland and American Culture

One of the most-visited tourist attractions in the world, subject of thousands of books and articles, adored by millions, yet reviled by many intellectuals, Disneyland has occupied a prominent place in American culture since it opened in 1955. This seminar will examine Disneyland as an expression of middle-class American values, as a locus of corporatism and consumerism, as a postmodern venue, as a utopia, and as an influence upon architecture and urban design. In a broader sense, we will use Disney to explore the ideals, the desires, and the anxieties that have shaped post-World War II American culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 340

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or AMST 101 and a 200-level course in American or modern culture (history, art, literature, economics, etc.). Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Bedell

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternating years.

AMST 348/ SOC 348
Conservatism in America

An examination of conservative movements and ideas in terms of class, gender, and race. Historical survey and social analysis of such major conservative movements and ideas as paleoconservatism, neoconservatism, and compassionate conservatism. The emergence of conservative stances among women, minorities, and media figures. The conservative critique of American life and its shaping of contemporary national discourse on morality, politics, and culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 348

Prerequisites: A 100-level sociology course or permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors only.

Instructor: Imber

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

AMST 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open by the permission of the director to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

AMST 355
Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Critiquing American Popular Culture

What does Riverdale or Instagram say about American society and culture? Do self-publishing and e-books liberate literature or undermine it? How have networks like HBO, Netflix, or Amazon promoted or undercut LGBTQ civil rights or gay marriage? American Studies often focuses on the appraisal, interpretation, and critique of historical and contemporary popular culture. Designed for juniors and seniors, this seminar will explore how American Studies multidisciplinary perspectives can be adapted to reviews, critiques, opinion pieces, and other forms of journalistic, literary, and public writing. Students will consider a variety of historical and contemporary American cultural products, including television, film, books, literature, websites, exhibitions, performances, and consumer products, in order to enter the public conversation about the cultural meanings, political implications, and social content of such culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: AMST 101 or another AMST 100- or 200-level course.

Instructor: Fisher

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

AMST 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the director.

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

AMST 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 2

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: AMST 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

AMST 383/ ENG 383
Women in Love: American Literature, Art, Photography, Film

Study in depth of two important, challenging American novels: The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James and Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser. Detailed consideration of biographical, historical, and social contexts. Also: film adaptations; works of art by John Singer Sargent, Thomas Eakins, and Georgia O'Keefe; and photographs by Alfred Stieglitz.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: AMST 383

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Cain

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 101
Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology

A comparative approach to the concept of culture and an analysis of how culture structures the worlds we live in. The course examines human societies from their tribal beginnings to the postindustrial age. We will consider the development of various types of social organization and their significance based on family and kinship, economics, politics, and religion.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Armstrong, TBD

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Formerly ANTH 104; may not be repeated for credit by students who have successfully completed ANTH 104.

ANTH 102
Introduction to Biological Anthropology

This course will examine the evolutionary foundations of human variability. This theme is approached broadly from the perspectives of anatomy, paleontology, genetics, primatology, and ecology. For this purpose, the course will address the principles of human evolution, fossil evidence, behavior, and morphological characteristics of human and nonhuman primates. Explanation of the interrelationships between biological and sociobehavioral aspects of human evolution, such as the changing social role of sex, are discussed. In addition, human inter-population differences and environmental factors that account for these differences will be evaluated.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Formerly ANTH 204; may not be repeated for credit by students who have successfully completed ANTH 204.

ANTH 103/ CLCV 103
Introduction to Archaeology

A survey of the development of archaeology. The methods and techniques of archaeology are presented through an analysis of excavations and prehistoric remains. Materials studied range from the Bronze Age and classical civilizations of the Old World and the Aztec and Inca empires of the New World to the historical archaeology of New England. Students are introduced to techniques for reconstructing the past from material remains. The course includes a field trip to a neighboring archaeological site.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: ANTH 10 3

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Minor

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Formerly ANTH 206; may not be repeated for credit by students who have successfully completed ANTH 206.

ANTH 205
Anthropology Methods and Project Design

This course is intended to provide a theoretical framework as to how anthropologists construct questions, design research strategies, and produce anthropological knowledge. Students will discuss and explore major framing questions for anthropological methods while pursuing an independent project of their choice. Working with a faculty advisor, students will engage in independent research, while using the class as a workshop and discussion environment to refine their project. Students will be exposed to issues of positionality, ethical obligations in research, mixed qualitative and quantitative methods, and writing for specific audiences. This course is required of all anthropology majors and will provide a bridge between introductory and advanced courses.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Any introductory Anthropology course (ANTH 101, ANTH 102, or ANTH 103), or permission of the instructor

Instructor: Ellison

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ANTH 207
Human Evolution

The hominid fossil record provides direct evidence for the evolution of humans and our ancestors through the past 5 million to 7 million years. This will provide an overview of human evolutionary history from the time of our last common ancestor with the living great apes through the emergence of "modern" humans. Emphasis is placed on evolutionary mechanisms, and context is provided through an understanding of the prehuman primates. The human story begins with origins and the appearance of unique human features such as bipedality, the loss of cutting canines, the appearance of continual sexual receptivity, births requiring midwifery, and the development of complex social interactions. An early adaptive shift sets the stage for the subsequent evolution of intelligence, technology, and the changes in physical form that are the consequences of the unique feedback system involving cultural and biological change.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Van Arsdale

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ANTH 209
Forensic Anthropology

The identification of human remains for criminological and political purposes is widespread. This course explores issues in the identification and interpretation of human bones including methods for determining sex, age, stature, and ancestry as well as for identifying pathologies and anomalies. The course will pay particular attention to those anatomical elements, both soft tissue and bones, that aid in the reconstruction of individuals and their lifestyles. In addition, the course explores search and recovery techniques, crime-scene analysis, the use of DNA in solving crimes, and the role of forensic anthropology in the investigation of mass fatalities from both accidents and human rights violations. It also addresses ballistics and the use of photography in forensic investigation. The course will include a weekly lab component focused on human osteology and skeletal analysis.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 42

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Van Arsdale

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Does not fulfill the laboratory requirement.

ANTH 210
Political Anthropology

This course explores major themes in the subfield of political anthropology. How do anthropologists locate “the political” and study it the ethnographically – that is, through the long-term fieldwork they conduct? Throughout this course, we will delve into anthropological approaches to power, authority, and domination; statecraft and transnational governance; everyday forms of resistance and collective action; violence and disorder; and the politics of care and abandonment, among other themes. We will consider the animating questions that helped consolidate the subfield during the 1940s and 1950s, and trace anthropology’s growing concern with (post)colonialism and global capitalism. Finally, we will explore questions of labor restructuring, activism, caregiving, and life itself in an era that is often characterized as “neoliberal.”

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Ellison

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 214
Race and Human Variation

This is a course about race concepts and human biological variation, viewed from historical and biological perspectives. This course thus has two intertwined emphases. One is placed on the historical connection between science and sociopolitical ideologies and policies. The other is on the evolutionary origin of human biological and cultural diversity. Through lecture and discussion section, topics explored include the role of polygenism, historically and in current scientific thought; biological determinism and scientific racism; the Holocaust and other examples of “applied biology”; and the role of the race concept in current scientific debates, such as those over the place of the Neanderthals in human evolution, as well as those over the book The Bell Curve. The course seeks to guide students through a critical exercise in studying the evolutionary origins of contemporary human biological variation and its close relationship with scientific and popular concepts of race.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Van Arsdale

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 215/ CLCV 215
Bronze Age Greece: Archaeology and the Digital Humanities

The archaeological evidence of Bronze Age settlements, sanctuaries, and cemeteries will be contextualized through the study of administrative records written on clay tablets and artistic representations, especially wall-paintings and luxury arts. This background will enable students to consider how the changing interpretations of fragmentary archaeological evidence are supplemented to produce more recognizable representations of Mycenaean and Minoan civilizations. We will disentangle the elements that characterize systems of power, cultural and religious practices, and interactions with neighboring societies. Students will analyze the archaeological evidence behind restored images, synthetic narratives, cultural geographies, and immersive experiences. Moreover, we will construct our own visualizations of archaeological data through diverse technologies, drawing links to the digital humanities, and will work extensively with digital applications to map and represent the ancient world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 50

Crosslisted Courses: ANTH 215

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Burns

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 217
Peoples, Histories, and Cultures of the Balkans

The Balkan region has been a major trade and cultural crossroads for millennia and encompasses a variety of landscapes, peoples, and cultures. We will read authoritative historical studies and ethnographies as well as short stories, poetry, books of travel, and fiction. We will consider the legacy of the classical world, the impact of Islam, the emergence of European commercial empires, the impact of the European Enlightenment in national movements, the emergence of modernization, and the socialist experiments in the hinterlands. The course offers a critical overview of the politics of historical continuity and the resurgence of Balkan nationalism during the last decade of the twentieth century.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Karakasidou

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ANTH 219
Balkan Cinematic Representations

In the course of Europe's road to modernity, the southeastern corner of the continent became known as the Balkans. The Western imagination rendered the peoples and the rich cultures of the area as backward, violent, and underdeveloped. This course examines the imagery of the area and its people through film. We will explore the use of history by filmmakers and the use of films in understanding a number of issues in the history of the Balkans. The course will trace the adoration of ancient Greek antiquity, the legacy of Byzantium and Orthodox Christianity as well as the Ottoman influence and the appearance of Islam. The historical past is (re)constructed and (re)presented in film, as are the national awakenings and liberation movements. The list of films we will watch and the anthropological and historical readings we will do aspire to cover various aspects of Balkan societies as revealed through visual and cinematic representations. Balkan film is politically, socially, and historically engaged, and we will use film narratives and stories to understand the area's diverse landscapes and cultures, religions and identities, love and hatred.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Karakasidou

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 222
Anthropology of Science

This course will introduce students to the anthropology of science and the use of anthropological methodology to study the making of science and technology. Through the analysis of case studies of biotechnology, energy, computing, lay and activist science, medicine, genetics, bioethics, the environment and conservation around the world, this class will investigate the global dynamics of science and technology. We will compare and contrast the production and use of scientific knowledge around the globe. What happens when science and technology travel and how do new places emerge as centers of knowledge production? How are culture, identity, technology, and science linked?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Karaksidou

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 227
Living in Material Worlds: Archaeological Approaches to Material Culture

Do you ever wonder what your possessions say about you? Our possessions and other things we use lie at the hearts of our everyday lives. We inadvertently generate material culture during our daily activities and interactions. In turn, material culture helps us structure negotiations with one another in our cultured worlds. Archaeology is unique among anthropological endeavors in its reliance on material culture to reconstruct and understand past human behavior. We will learn methodological and theoretical approaches from archaeology and ethnography for understanding material culture. Lecture topics will be explored in hands-on labs. Studying the world of material can help us understand the nature of objects and how humans have interacted with them across time and space. In addition, material culture indicates how humans mobilize objects in their cross-cultural interactions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Minor

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 229/ ES 219
GIS and Spatial Reasoning for Social and Behavioral Analysis

This course introduces students to Geographic Information Systems (GIS), and the use of spatial data in social and behavioral research. Many human behaviors have a spatial component. Space can also provide a common framework to identify and understand patterns within complex relationships. The course will emphasize how to design, execute and present original research through lectures and labs. Students will develop conceptual tools for spatial-reasoning, how to use specific software packages, and how to present interpretations and results in graphic form. The approaches to GIS will be relevant to students from Anthropology, Sociology, Economics, History, and other cognate disciplines. We will cover main concepts and applications of GIS as used in human ecology, planning and development, conflict studies, and epidemiology, for example.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: ES 219

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Does not fulfill the laboratory requirement.

ANTH 231/ PEAC 231
Anthropology In and Of the City

This course serves as an introduction to urban anthropology. There was a time when anthropology was predominately associated with rural settings. In recent decades, however, anthropologists increasingly have turned their attention to emerging global cities, studying everything from squatter movements and gang activity to the gleaming institutions of global capitalism found on Wall Street. The course is organized around four particular places on the cityscape that stand as symbolic markers for larger anthropological questions we will examine throughout the course; the market stall, the gated community, the barricade, and the levee. These symbolic destinations will present the city as a place of ethnographic encounter, uniquely structured along lines of class, race, and gender, as well as a contested space, where imagined and real barriers limit access to social, economic, and political operations.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 231

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Ellison

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ANTH 232/ CAMS 232
Anthropology of Media

This course introduces students to key analytic frameworks through which media and the mediation of culture have been examined. Using an anthropological approach, students will explore how media as representation and as cultural practice have been fundamental to the (trans)formation of modern sensibilities and social relations. We will examine various technologies of mediation-from the Maussian body as “Man's first technical instrument” to print capitalism, radio and cassette cultures, cinematic and televisual publics, war journalism, the digital revolution, and the political milieu of spin and public relations. Themes in this course include: media in the transformation of the senses; media in the production of cultural subjectivities and publics; and the social worlds and cultural logics of media institutions and sites of production.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 232

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Karakasidou

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ANTH 234/ REL 235
Religion, Healing, and Medicine

A study of religion, healing, and medicine in interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective, with a particular focus on traditional religious healing methods and their relationships to contemporary clinical medical practice.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: ANTH 234

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ANTH 235/ MUS 245
Doing Ethnomusicology: Critical Music Studies "Out in the Field"

This course has three primary aims: (1) to give students the experience of doing ethnographic research in a local community; (2) to introduce key concepts pertaining to ethnomusicology, or the study of music in cultural context; (3) to create a good working atmosphere in which students can share research with each other. Students will gain experience doing fieldwork as participant/observers; taking scratch notes and writing up field journals; recording and transcribing interviews; and doing library and online research. Each student will conduct weekly visits to a local musical group or community of her choice. Past projects have focused on Senegalese drumming, Balinese gamelan, and hip-hop dance. The semester will culminate in a final presentation and paper (8-10 pages) based on the student's research.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: ANTH 235

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Goldschmitt

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 236/ REL 236
Divine Madness: Dreams, Visions, Hallucinations

What constitutes “madness” and why do some societies give it particular religious meanings and designated roles? This course considers these links and their historical development over time and across cultures. We trace, in particular, how madness transitioned from a spiritual problem to a biomedical one. As part of this discourse, students will debate the hotly contested question of whether people with mental illness in Western cultures might be recognized as shamans, mystics, or visionaries elsewhere. The latter half of the course will be devoted to investigating clinical dilemmas related to mental illness and religiosity in global context. Students will also curate a “madness lab” each week where we analyze film, music, scientific texts, and other cultural artifacts depicting dreams, visions, and hallucinations.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: ANTH 236

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 237
Ethnography in/of South Asia

Anthropology has a fraught and complex history within South Asia. Many of its techniques of knowledge production were honed within the colonial context. In the postcolonial period, these techniques have been taken up by scholars within the region and beyond to update and challenge long-standing understandings of the region. Much historical and recent scholarship grapples with how one ought to understand the unique nature of the region's forms of culture and social organization, and to place them in relation to modernity and the West. South Asia proves an insistently fruitful case for assessing the universality or provincial nature of Western social theory and to consider the connections between knowledge and power. In this course, students will come to comprehend and assess the history of ethnography and anthropology in India, Pakistan, and other parts of South Asia. Through contemporary ethnographic texts, they will also gain insight into the major social and cultural categories and phenomena that have come to define South Asia today such as caste, kinship and gender, class, nationalism, and popular culture. Throughout, we will consider the politics of representation and knowledge production that are particularly fraught in this postcolonial context.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Armstrong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ANTH 238
The Vulnerable Body: Anthropological Understandings

This course begins with the assumption that the human body is a unit upon which collective categories are engraved. These categories can vary from social values, to religious beliefs, to feelings of national belonging, to standards of sexuality and beauty. Readings in this course will concentrate on the classic and recent attempts in the social and historical sciences to develop ways of understanding this phenomenon of "embodiment." We will begin with an overview of what is considered to be the "construction" of the human body in various societies and investigate how the body has been observed, experienced, classified, modified, and sacralized in different social formations.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Karakasidou

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 239
Visual Culture of South Asia

The Indian subcontinent is iconic for its rich and varied visual traditions-from Mughal miniatures to calendar art, monumental architecture to television soap operas. With the spread of "Bollywood" films beyond the subcontinent, and with American television now representing Indian culture during prime time, an anthropological perspective on South Asian visual culture is particularly timely. In this course, we will examine many of the diverse visual forms and practices of the region from an anthropological perspective-that is, focusing on the social practices and cultural formations that arise around and shape them. We will learn how anthropologists study South Asian visual practices, including photography, film, textiles, and comic books, and assess the implications of these practices for Western theories about visuality and modernity.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 243
The (In)Visible Native America: Past and Present

This course will examine the historical significance of Native Americans within anthropology as well as the contemporary challenge of defining Native American identity in a scientific context. The study of indigenous North American populations played a major role in the early formation of American anthropology as a discipline. The treatment of Native Americans as a subject for study has left a legacy across the social and natural sciences of thinking of Native peoples as research entities of the past, even as they remain communities of the present. Throughout anthropology's history, the discipline has played a paradoxical role in adding to our knowledge of North American prehistory and human biological variation, while contributing to the systematic erasure of the idea of contemporary Native peoples.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 245/ LAST 245
Culture, Politics, and Power: Anthropological Perspectives on Latin America

This course explores contemporary issues in Latin America from an anthropological perspective. We will discuss legacies of colonialism and Cold War power struggles, as well as the active role indigenous peoples and social movements are playing in crafting Latin American futures. We will trace the ways the region is enmeshed in transnational processes and migrations and analyze the intersection of culture, race, gender, and class in shaping urban centers, rural hinterlands, and livelihood strategies within them. In particular, we will discuss how ethnographic research – the long-term fieldwork conducted by anthropologists – can enrich our understanding of hotly debated issues such as statecraft, borders, and shifting meanings of citizenship; in/security, human rights, and democratization; and, illicit economies, extractive industries, and development.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: LAST 245

Prerequisites: At least one 100 or 200 course in anthropology, sociology, political science or economics or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Ellison

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 246
From Glyphs to Bytes: Ancient Egypt and the Future of Digital Humanities

Online resources for the ancient world are at the forefront of digital humanities developments. How can the past be captured in digital form? What forms of advanced media visualization and computer analysis can give new insights on ancient data? Can public dissemination of historical studies positively impact our lives in the present? How can we ensure that our digital cultural achievements last as long as pyramids built in stone? This course will pair readings on the theory and practice of digital humanities with projects utilizing online content about ancient Egypt. The digital Egyptological resources discussed in class will provide an overview of ancient Egyptian civilization. Over the course of the semester we will critique current offerings and trends in online resources. The final project will be the creation of a new online Egyptological resource, presenting of content created by students through a digital platform of their choice/design.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Minor

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ANTH 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ANTH 104 and permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ANTH 250GH
Research or Group Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: By permission of the instructor.

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ANTH 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ANTH 104 and permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ANTH 251
Cultures of Cancer

This course critically examines cancer as a pervasive disease and a metaphor of global modern cultures. Students will be exposed to the ways cancer is perceived as a somatic and social standard within locally constructed cognitive frameworks. They will investigate the scientific and emotional responses to the disease and the ways cancer challenges our faith and spirituality, our ways of life, notions of pollution and cleanliness, and our healing strategies. This approach to cancer is comparative and interdisciplinary and focuses on how specialists in different societies have described the disease, how its victims in different cultures have narrated their experiences, how causality has been perceived, and what interventions (sacred or secular) have been undertaken as therapy and prevention.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Karakasidou

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 252
The Archaeology of Wellesley: College Hall Fire Summer Field School

A 4-week archaeology field school covers the process of research design, site identification, survey, undertaking excavation, basics of conservation, and digital documentation. The Wellesley College Hall Archaeology Project seeks evidence of daily lives of the Wellesley community, circa 1914. Excavation will be in areas containing remnants of the 1914 College Hall Fire, which destroyed the original College building overnight, finding fragments of student belongings, classroom equipment, and architecture over 100 years later. Students will identify research questions about experiences of the Wellesley community (daily life, gender, social class), and build a project addressing issues resonating with students today. Community participatory research includes involving the community through interviews, social media, and public outreach. Please note: excavation includes physical exertion, students with disability concerns are encouraged to contact the instructor and accessible fieldwork tasks will be implemented.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Minor

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Notes:

ANTH 262
The Archaeology of Human Sacrifice: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of the Politics of Death

This class will use archaeological methods to explore the practice of human sacrifice in a range of cultural contexts. The act of killing a human has played significant roles in the development and maintenance of socio-political power from ancient times and into the present day. The goal of this course is to move away from a simple model of sacrifice as a ‘barbaric’ act of violence to an understanding of sacrifice as a ritualized political act within systems of legitimization or social coercion. Case studies will draw from worldwide ancient examples, often in comparison to contemporary cases.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Minor

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ANTH 265/ ES 265
The Politics of Nature

In this course we will consider the historical, social, and political life of nature in its many guises and from an anthropological perspective. What is the relationship between resource control and the consolidation of power? How have indigenous movements and development agencies mobilized ideas of participatory conservation to achieve their goals, and how have these same concepts been used to exclude or to reproduce inequality? We will explore themes such as the relationship between race, nature, and security; intellectual property and bioprospecting; and the lived effects of the many “green,” “sustainable,” and “eco-tourism” projects now attracting foreign travelers around the world. Additionally, the course will introduce students unfamiliar with socio-cultural anthropology to ethnographic research methods, ethical dilemmas, and the craft of ethnographic writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: ES 265

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Ellison

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ANTH 274
Anthropological Genetics

This course will provide an introduction into the core concepts of population genetics, with special focus on their application to human and nonhuman primate evolution. Population genetics is the branch of evolutionary biology concerned with how genetic variation is patterned within and between populations and how these patterns change over time. Though the theory is applicable to all organisms, specific examples drawn from the human and nonhuman primate literature will be used as case studies. Topics will also include the genetic basis for disease, pedigree analysis, and personal genomics. The course will be structured around lectures and discussion with regular computer labs to provide firsthand experience working with anthropological genetic topics and analyses of genetic data sets.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Van Arsdale

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ANTH 277/ WRIT 277
True Stories: Ethnographic Writing for the Social Sciences and Humanities

Do you like to "people watch"? Do you wish you could translate your real-world experiences into narratives that are readable and relatable, and also intellectually rigorous? If so, you probably have an ethnographic writer hiding somewhere inside you, and this class will give them the opportunity to emerge. Ethnography, a “written document of culture,” has long been a key component of a cultural anthropologist’s tool-kit, and scholars in other fields have recently begun to take up this practice. We will read classic and contemporary ethnographies to better understand the theoretical and practical significance of these texts. Students will also have the unique opportunity to be the authors and subjects of original ethnographic accounts, and at various stages in the semester they will act as anthropologists and as informants. Although this course will emphasize an anthropological method, it is appropriate for students from various disciplines who are looking to expand their research skills and develop new ways to engage in scholarly writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: WRIT 277

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the First-Year Writing requirement. Not open to first-year students.

Instructor: Justin Armstrong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ANTH 278
Machines for Living and Structures of Feeling: Anthropological Approaches to Design and Architecture

What can architecture and design tell anthropologists about culture? This seminar addresses this question using a distinctly anthropological approach that focuses on topics as diverse as the ethnographic analysis of vernacular architecture in rural Newfoundland, how the Danish notion of hygge (coziness) informs a culturally distinct design aesthetic, and the ways in which city planning influences cultural identity in Boston. Students engage in themed discussions and participate in case-based workshops that utilize foundational anthropological practices including participant-observation, visual anthropology, and ethnographic writing to form real-world dialogues about the cultural significance of design and architecture. Core anthropological concepts such as cultural relativity, applied ethnography, globalization, and the anthropology of space and place serve as the central themes for the course as we apply contemporary anthropological theory to cross-cultural understandings of architecture and design.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Armstrong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 299
Home and Away: Human Geography and the Cultural Dimensions of Space and Place

Why are myths often tied to geography and why are particular locations charged with powerful cultural meaning? This anthropological field course in Iceland explores the diverse ways that humans interact with their surroundings to create culture. This intensive two-week excursion (followed by two weeks of follow-up assignments) examines the cultural and geographic significance of Iceland's unique landscape and settlements. Glacial lakes, bustling cities, remote fishing villages, and eerie lava fields provide the setting for an introduction to the fascinating field of cultural geography. Students gain hands-on experience with methods of cultural anthropology, including participant-observation, interviewing, writing field notes, photography, and critical analysis. A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, this course offers students a rare chance to conduct ethnographic research in one of the most stunning places on Earth!

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 8

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Armstrong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Summer

Notes: Not offered every year. Subject to Provost's Office approval.

ANTH 300
Ethnographic Methods and Ethnographic Writing

An exploration of anthropological research and writing through the analytical and practical study of "fieldwork" and "ethnography." Examines a variety of anthropological research methods and genres of representation, paying particular attention to questions of knowledge, location, evidence, ethics, power, translation, experience, and the way theoretical problems can be framed in terms of ethnographic research. Students will be asked to apply critical knowledge in a fieldwork project of their own design.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: ANTH 205 or permission of instructor.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 301
Advanced Theory in Anthropology

This course introduces students to contemporary anthropology by tracing its historical development and its specific application in ethnographic writing. It examines the social context in which each selected model or "paradigm" took hold and the extent of cognitive sharing, by either intellectual borrowing or breakthrough. The development of contemporary theory will be examined both as internal to the discipline and as a response to changing intellectual climates and social milieu. The course will focus on each theory in action, as the theoretical principles and methods apply to ethnographic case studies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Two 200-level units in anthropology, economics, history, political science, or sociology, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ANTH 305/ CAMS 305
Ethnographic Film

This seminar explores ethnographic film as a genre for representing "reality," anthropological knowledge and cultural lives. We will examine how ethnographic film emerged in a particular intellectual and political economic context as well as how subsequent conceptual and formal innovations have shaped the genre. We will also consider social responses to ethnographic film in terms of the contexts for producing and circulating these works; the ethical and political concerns raised by cross-cultural representation; and the development of indigenous media and other practices in conversation with ethnographic film. Throughout the course, we will situate ethnographic film within the larger project for representing "culture," addressing the status of ethnographic film in relation to other documentary practices, including written ethnography, museum exhibitions, and documentary film.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 30 5

Prerequisites: ANTH 301 or two 200-level units in anthropology, cinema and media studies, economics, history, political science, or sociology or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 310
Wintersession in the Southern Balkans

This course aspires to familiarize students with the subtleties of national Balkan rifts and cultural divisions, through international study in the Southern Balkans during Wintersession. The overall theme of the course will center on national majorities and ethnic minorities. The cultural diversity of the area will be examined both as a historical and as contemporary phenomenon. Students will be exposed to the legacy of the classical world, the impact of Christianity and Islam, the role of European commercial empires, the impact of the European Enlightenment in national movements, the emergence of modernization, and the socialist experiments in Macedonia and Bulgaria. The course will also offer a critical overview of the politics of historical continuity and the resurgence of Balkan nationalism during the last decade of the twentieth century.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ANTH 217 or ANTH 219, or some familiarity with the area.

Instructor: Karakasidou

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Winter

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Winter

Notes: Not offered every year. Subject to Provost's Office approval.

ANTH 314
Human Biology and Society

This seminar will provide an anthropological perspective on the intersection between human biology and society in three related topics. The first unit will focus on human genetic diversity and the increasing use of genetic information in society. Included in this unit will be discussions of genetic ancestry testing and the construction of identity. The second unit will examine in more detail the genetic basis of phenotypic traits and disease, exploring what our genes can reveal about us while also considering the problems of biological determinism. The final unit will extend the understanding of human biological variation by looking at the relationship between humans and our environment, how our environment changed throughout prehistory and contemporary times, and what role the environment plays in shaping human variation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ANTH 204, ANTH 214, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Van Arsdale

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 319
Nationalism, Politics, and the Use of the Remote Past

This seminar critically examines the use of prehistory and antiquity for the construction of accounts of national origins, historical claims to specific territories, or the biased assessment of specific peoples. The course begins with an examination of the phenomenon of nationalism and the historically recent emergence of contemporary nation-states. It then proceeds comparatively, selectively examining politically motivated appropriations of the remote past that either were popular earlier in this century or have ongoing relevance for some of the ethnic conflicts raging throughout the world today. The course will attempt to develop criteria for distinguishing credible and acceptable reconstructions of the past from those that are unbelievable and/or dangerous.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One 200-level unit in anthropology, economics, political science, sociology, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Minor

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ANTH 321
Anthropology of the Senses

People’s senses—their capabilities to apprehend the world through touch, smell, taste, feeling, and hearing—seem to define human experiences, uniting us in one great common condition. At the same time, many have argued that the senses are understood—and indeed experienced—differently across disparate contexts. What does it mean to consider that what we take to be among the most foundational and universal aspects of human engagement with the world might be culturally, historically and socially constituted? This course introduces students to the scholarship of sensory experience—an interdisciplinary field that we will center on anthropology, but that also involves performance studies, arts and media studies. It explores the basic question of how to produce scholarly knowledge about embodied sensory experience that in many ways seems to defy the descriptive capacities of the written word.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ANTH 101 and two 200-level courses in anthropology or the permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 333
Seminar: Taking, Keeping, Giving: Anthropologies of Exchange

From giant, immovable stone currency on the Pacific island of Yap to accumulating 'likes' on social media, we occupy a world of exchange where our everyday lives are mediated through the transfer of objects, ideas, and various forms of capital. This seminar examines the cross-cultural understanding of exchange from an anthropological perspective with particular attention paid to gift-giving, social and cultural capital, money, and the transmission of knowledge across space and time. Drawing on the work of Malinowski, Bourdieu, Marx, Mauss, Derrida and many other anthropologists and philosophers, we will unpack the hidden dimensions of taking, keeping and giving as key elements of culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ANTH 101, or permission by instructor.

Instructor: Armstrong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 335/ REL 335
Seminar: Good Deaths: From the Tibetan Book of the Dead to the ICU

Tibetan death practices-made famous by a translation of the Bardo Thödol (termed “The Tibetan Book of the Dead” by an American anthropologist in 1927)-have been used to reconfigure notions of a “good death” across a number of contexts. This seminar provides a grounding in the text itself, which serves as an entry point to studying scholarly accounts of illness, death, and dying. We trace the movement of the Bardo Thödol: as a “mind-treasure” revealed to a yogini in 8th century India, its translation and scholarly acclaim in the early 1900s, and finally, its contemporary use in Euro-American hospice care. The course investigates not only how "The Tibetan Book of the Dead" has contributed to new concepts of death and dying, but also how advanced medical technologies trouble what it means to be alive or dead.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: ANTH 335

Prerequisites: Previous courses in Religion, Anthropology, Health & Society, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 341
Indigenous Resurgence

This seminar will examine the politics, theories, and conditions of indigeneity. We will cover topics ranging from Spanish reducciones and ideologies of mestizaje in the Americas to debates over the limits of legal recognition under “neoliberal multiculturalism” in Australia and Indonesia. We will explore issues ranging from tribal gaming/casinos and indigenous sovereignty in the U.S., to the rise of Bolivia’s President Evo Morales and his efforts to put a Pro-Pachamama (Mother Earth) platform on the global stage. In the process, we will touch on issues of settler colonialism, struggles over authenticity, sovereignty, political recognition, and citizenship, questions of gender and sexuality, and the historic antecedents of contemporary revitalization movements and political activism. Additionally, we consider the political implications of anthropology’s study of indigeneity and native scholars’ efforts to de-colonize social knowledge by reforming anthropology.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ANTH 104

Instructor: Ellison

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 345/ MUS 345
Introduction to Ethnomusicology: The Anthropology of Music

This course has three primary aims: (1) to give students the experience of doing ethnographic research in a local community; (2) to introduce key concepts pertaining to ethnomusicology, or the study of music in cultural context; (3) to create a good working atmosphere in which students can share research with each other. Students will gain experience doing fieldwork as participant/observers; taking scratch notes and writing up field journals; recording and transcribing interviews; and doing library and online research. Each student will conduct weekly visits to a local musical group or community of her choice. Past projects have focused on Senegalese drumming, Balinese gamelan, and hip-hop dance. The semester will culminate in a final presentation and paper (15 pages) based on the student's research.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: ANTH 345

Prerequisites: MUS 100

Instructor: Goldschmitt

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ANTH 346
Seminar: Doing Well, Doing Good?: The Political Lives of NGOs

From de-mining countries to rehabilitating child soldiers, from channeling donations for AIDS orphans to coordinating relief efforts in the wake of natural disasters, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are ubiquitous. They provide essential services once thought to be the purview of the state, and increasingly champion entrepreneurial approaches to poverty reduction. NGOs are also subject to heated debate and increased surveillance within the countries where they operate. This seminar brings a critical anthropological lens to bear on the work of NGOs, connecting global trends, donor platforms, and aid workers to the everyday experiences of people targeted by NGO projects.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Two 200-level units in anthropology, economics, history, political science, or sociology, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Ellison

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ANTH 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ANTH 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ANTH 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ANTH 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 2

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ANTH 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ARAB 101
Elementary Arabic

An introduction to the Arabic language. The course takes a comprehensive approach to language learning and emphasizes the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to the principles of grammar, taught how to read and write in the Arabic alphabet, and trained in the basics of everyday conversation. Through the use of a variety of written, video, and audio materials, as well as other resources made available through the Web, the course emphasizes authentic materials and stresses the active participation of students in the learning process.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Zitnick

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Each semester of ARAB 101 and ARAB 102 earns 1.0 unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

ARAB 102
Elementary Arabic

An introduction to the Arabic language. The course takes a comprehensive approach to language learning and emphasizes the four skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students are introduced to the principles of grammar, taught how to read and write in the Arabic alphabet, and trained in the basics of everyday conversation. Through the use of a variety of written, video, and audio materials, as well as other resources made available through the Web, the course emphasizes authentic materials and stresses the active participation of students in the learning process.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARAB 101

Instructor: Zitnick

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Each semester of ARAB 101 and ARAB 102 earns 1.0 unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

ARAB 201
Intermediate Arabic

A continuation of ARAB 101-ARAB 102. The course takes students to a deeper and more complex level in the study of the Arabic language. While continuing to emphasize the organizing principles of the language, the course also introduces students to a variety of challenging texts, including extracts from newspaper articles, as well as literary and religious materials. Students will be trained to work with longer texts and to gain the necessary communicative skills to prepare them for advanced-level Arabic.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARAB 101, ARAB 102, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Aadnani

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Each semester of ARAB 201 and ARAB 202 earns 1.0 unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

ARAB 202
Intermediate Arabic

A continuation of ARAB 201. The course takes students to a deeper and more complex level in the study of the Arabic language. While continuing to emphasize the organizing principles of the language, the course also introduces students to a variety of challenging texts, including extracts from newspaper articles, as well as literary and religious materials. Students will be trained to work with longer texts and to gain the necessary communicative skills to prepare them for advanced-level Arabic.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARAB 101, ARAB 102, ARAB 201, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Aadnani

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Each semester of ARAB 201 and 202 earns 1.0 unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

ARAB 210
Introduction to Arabic Literature in Translation (in English)

Exploration of some highly influential works of literature translated from Arabic. Students will have a chance to delve into literary works composed by authors from a large geographical area, extending from Morocco to the Middle East, from the turn of the nineteenth century to the present day. Our study of modern and contemporary Arabic literature will focus on a number of recurring themes, such as cultural and national identity, colonialism, religion, gender relations, and class conflict. Authors to be discussed include Naguib Mahfouz, Abdelrahman Munif, Ahlam Mosteghanemi, Leila Abouzeid, Tahir Wattar, Mohammed Zafzaf, and Yusuf Idris.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Aadnani

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ARAB 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARAB 201-ARAB 202 or equivalent and permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ARAB 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ARAB 201-ARAB 202 or equivalent and permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

ARAB 301
Advanced Arabic I

Continuation of ARAB 201-ARAB 202. Involving further development of students' skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course exposes students to a variety of authentic Arabic materials, including print and online sources, incorporating MSA and diglossia. Focus on enhanced communication skills in Arabic and attention to the use of language in its sociocultural context. Appropriate for students who have completed ARAB 201-ARAB 202 at Wellesley or the equivalent in summer courses or international study programs.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARAB 201-ARAB 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Zitnick

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

ARAB 302
Advanced Arabic II

Continuation of ARAB 301. Further development of all linguistic skills with special attention to reading, writing, and discussion. The course also introduces students to modern Arabic literature. Focus on enhanced communication skills in Arabic and attention to the use of language in its sociocultural context. Appropriate for students who have completed ARAB 301 at Wellesley or the equivalent in summer courses or international study programs.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARAB 301 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Zitnick

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ARAB 305
Arabic Translation Workshop

Study of the techniques and problems involved in translating from Arabic into English. Although the focus will be on text-to-text translation of short stories, poems and other types of literary texts, students will also experiment with speech-to-speech translation, text-to-speech translation, and speech-to-text translation. The aim of these varied activities is to help students acquire a deeper understanding of the Arabic language and to further their proficiency in the four linguistic skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students will also discuss a range of methods and options for tackling and translating challenging linguistic formulations and transferring meaning from the original context to the English-speaking context.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARAB 201 - ARAB 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARAB 307
Readings in Classical Arabic Literature

Close readings and study of selected prose and verse from the rich repertoire of Classical Arabic literature. Readings will be selected in part in response to the interests of students enrolled in the course, but are likely to include some of the following: readings from sacred texts and the traditional scholarly traditions, mystical and philosophical writings, historiographical and geographical writings, collections of stories, travelers' accounts, letters and diaries, and various kinds of poetry. All readings will be in Arabic, with discussion and written assignments mostly in English.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: ARAB 201-ARAB 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARAB 310/ MES 310
Resist&Dissent N.Afric&MidEast

An exploration of themes of resistance and dissent in the literatures and cultures of North Africa and the Middle East since the early 1980s. Topics include the rise of democratic movements, such as political parties, associations, and NGOs; the role and importance of Islam to the identity of contemporary nation-states in the region; the status of women and minorities in the ideologies of the movements under study; and the status and implications of dissent. Materials studied include works of fiction and nonfiction, films, speeches, song lyrics, and online publications.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: ARAB 310

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Aadnani

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARAB 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ARAB 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ARAB 368/ REL 368
Writing Islamic History

How did the major Muslim historians of the pre-modern period think about the past and its relationship to the present? What genres of historical writing did they develop, what topics and themes did they address, who were their audiences, and how did they shape and reflect the mentalities of their times? This seminar explores the writing of history in Arabic, Persian and Turkish, with readings and analysis of historical accounts in English translation. Students who wish to take this course for credit in Arabic should have taken ARAB 202 or the equivalent and should enroll in ARAB 368.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: ARAB 368

Prerequisites: If taking the course for credit in Arabic, ARAB 202 or equivalent.

Instructor: Marlow

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARCH 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ARCH 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the directors and advisory committee.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ARCH 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 2

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ARCH 360 and permission of the directors and the advisory committee.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ARTH 100
The Power of Images: An Introduction to Art and its Histories

Why does art matter? Because images, buildings, and environments shape our ways of understanding our world and ourselves. Learning how to look closely and analyze what you see, therefore, is fundamental to a liberal arts education. Within a global frame, this course provides an introduction to art and its histories through a series of case studies, from ancient China's terra cotta army to Amy Sherald's portrait of Michelle Obama. Meeting twice weekly, each section will draw on the case studies to explore concepts of gender and race, cultural appropriation, political propaganda, and other issues through short lectures and class discussions. Site visits and assignments will engage with the rich art and architectural resources of Wellesley's campus.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Bedell, Berman, Brey, Cassibry, Greene, Liu, Oliver

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: This course is open to all students; it is required for all Art History, Architecture, and Studio Majors.

ARTH 110Y
First-Year Seminar: Michelangelo: Artist and Myth

This first-year seminar examines the Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo Buonarroti (1474-1564). Although he is best known as a sculptor and painter, Michelangelo was also a poet, architect, civil engineer, and diplomat driven by complex artistic, religious, political, and economic motivations. His long career provides a framework for understanding the Italian Renaissance, and the mythology surrounding that career provides insight into changing perceptions of the artist and the individual during that time. Readings and discussions will focus on works of art and contemporary texts, and class meetings will include visits to Wellesley’s Special Collections and Book Arts Lab as well as the Museum of Fine Arts and the Gardner Museum in Boston.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 112Y/ ASTR 112Y
First Year Seminar: The Art of Science since the Scientific Revolution

How have the visual arts advanced the sciences? And how, in turn, have artistic representations been informed by scientific knowledge? This seminar examines the intersection of art and science as it relates to astronomy, cartography, botany, and anatomy, among several other fields, from the scientific revolution to the present day. Additionally, we will consider how scientific observations have been visually classified and described through images and data visualization. Along with readings and class discussion, we will make extensive use of rare illustrated manuscripts in the Special Collections department, take several field trips to art and science collections in the Boston area, and perform our own experiments to investigate the technologies that have historically facilitated the close correspondence between the visual arts and scientific discovery.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: ASTR 112Y

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Liza Oliver, Wes Watters

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 140Y
FYS The Bostonians: Art and Architecture of the Gilded Age

This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the period known as the Gilded Age (circa 1870-1910) as experienced by the diverse population of Boston and its environs. While focusing particularly on the lives and work of the city's cultural elite, the course will also examine social and economic inequality across gender, race, and social class. We will examine the artistic and literary expressions that defined the age and region. The class will include visits to the Gardner Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Mount Auburn Cemetery, and local private collections and historic sites, as well as hands-on activities in Wellesley's papermaking and book arts studios.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 11

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Martha McNamara, Jacqueline Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; HS - Historical Studies

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 200
Architecture and Urban Form

An introduction to the study of architecture and the built environment. This course is limited to majors or prospective majors in architecture, art history, studio art, or urban studies, or to those students with a serious interest in theoretical and methodological approaches to those fields.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ARTH 203
Iraq's Antiquities, Then and Now

Iraq's antiquities have long mediated conflicts. The palaces at Nineveh may have made headlines after their destruction in 2015, but many prior groups had assaulted the site too, including ancient Babylonians and modern treasure-seekers. This course considers Iraq's antiquities in a sequence of contexts: their initial creation and reception, their appropriation or destruction by rival groups in antiquity, their imperializing excavation by European archaeologists, and their conservation, looting, and destruction in recent decades. Students will leave the course with a keen understanding of how Iraq's ancient art and architecture have been used to negotiate power from antiquity to today.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. Prior coursework in Art History, Classical Civilization, or Middle Eastern Studies recommended.

Instructor: Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 206
American Art, Architecture, and Design: 1600-1950

This course will explore artistic expression in America from the time of European contact to the mid-twentieth century. Proceeding both thematically and chronologically, the course will highlight the range of diverse practices and media Americans deployed to define, shape, enact, and represent their changing experience. We will explore mapping and the platting of towns during the 17th and 18th centuries; the role of portraiture in colonial society; gender and domestic interiors; landscape painting and national identity; print culture, photography and the industrialized image; utopian societies and reform; World's Fairs, city planning, and urban culture; moving images, advertising, and mass consumption. As much as possible, the class will include site visits to area museums and historic landscapes.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None; ARTH 101 recommended.

Instructor: McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ARTH 224
Modern Art to 1945

A survey of modern art from the 1880s to World War II, examining the major movements of the historical avant-garde (such as cubism, expressionism, Dada, and surrealism) as well as alternate practices. Painting, sculpture, photography, cinema, and the functional arts will be discussed, and critical issues, including the art market and gender, national, and cultural identities, will be examined.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Berman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 225
Modern Art Since 1945

An analysis of art since World War II, examining painting, sculpture, photography, performance, video, film, conceptual practices, social and intermedial practices, and the mass media. Critical issues to be examined include the art market, feminist art practices, the politics of identity, and artistic freedom and censorship.This course will include a trip to New York City.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 40

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Berman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ARTH 226/ CAMS 207
History of Photography: From Invention to Media Age

Photography is so much a part of our private and public lives, and it plays such an influential role in our environment, that we often forget to examine its aesthetics, meanings, and histories. This course provides an introduction to these analyses by examining the history of photography from the 1830s to the present. Considering fine arts and mass media practices, the class will examine the works of individual practitioners as well as the emergence of technologies, aesthetic directions, markets, and meanings.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 20 7

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 strongly recommended.

Instructor: Berman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ARTH 227
Art in the Age of Crusades: Visual Cultures of the Mediterranean 1000-1400

This course introduces students to the visual cultures of the Mediterranean in the centuries of the Crusades. It approaches the distinct local, religious, and imperial visual cultures of the Mediterranean as interlocking units within a larger regional system. Focusing on the mobile networks of patrons, merchants, objects, and artisans that connected centers of artistic and architectural production, it covers a geographical territory that includes Spain, North Africa, the Middle East, Anatolia, and the Italian Peninsula. Readings emphasize the theoretical frameworks of hybridity, appropriation, hegemony, and exoticism through which Medieval Mediterranean art and architecture have been understood. Discussions will highlight the significant connections that existed among the Western Medieval, Byzantine, and Islamic worlds.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Alexander Brey

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 228
Modern Architecture

A survey of the major movements in architecture in Europe and the Americas from neoclassicism to the present.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 230
Frank Lloyd Wright and the American Home

An investigation of Wright's domestic architecture in its cultural and historical context.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ARTH 231
Architecture and Urbanism in North America

This course will present a survey of American architecture and urbanism from prehistory to the late twentieth century. Lectures and discussions will focus particularly on placing the American-built environment in its diverse political, economic, and cultural contexts. We will also explore various themes relating to Americans' shaping of their physical surroundings, including the evolution of domestic architecture, the organization and planning of cities and towns, the relationships among urban, suburban and rural environments, the impact of technology, and Americans' ever-changing relationship with nature.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ARTH 234
Latin American Art

This introductory survey explores Latin American and Latinx art of the 20th and 21st centuries. Through a series of case studies we will investigate how these painters, photographers, muralists and others engaged international currents (from symbolism to conceptual art) while also addressing local themes, such as national and racial identity, class difference, gender inequality, political struggle, and state violence. We will also cover the history of collecting and exhibiting Latin American and Latinx art. This course has no prerequisites; students without an art history background are welcome. Advanced students who enroll in 334 will have additional assignments, including a research essay. In Spring 2019, the course will be tied to a major exhibition of Latin American and Latinx art at the Davis Museum.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 99

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Oles

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 236
The Arts of the Ancient Americas

This course will provide an introduction to the arts of the Ancient Americas from before the Spanish Conquest. Rather than a survey, we will concentrate on courtly ceremonial life in major cities from the Teotihuacan, Maya, Moche, Aztec, and Inca civilizations. We will explore specific artistic forms viewed across time and space, including palace architecture; stone sculpture; luxury arts of gold and feathers; textiles and costume; and manuscript painting. The course will also examine the history of collecting, with attention to legal and ethical concerns. We will consider the roles of archaeologists, curators, collectors, and fakers in creating our image of the Ancient American past. In-class discussion will be combined with the study of original objects and forms of display at the Davis and area museums.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Oles

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: There are no prerequisites

ARTH 238
Chinese Art and Architecture

This course is a survey of the art and architecture of China from the Neolithic period to the turn of the twentieth century in two simultaneous approaches: chronologically through time and thematically with art in the tomb, at court, in the temple, in the life of the élite, and in the marketplace. It is designed to introduce students to the major monuments and issues of Chinese art and architecture by exploring the interactions of art, religion, culture, society, and creativity, especially how different artistic styles were tied to different intellectual thoughts, historical events, and geographical locations.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 239/ SAS 239
Art and Architecture of South Asia

This course covers the visual culture of India from ancient Indus Valley civilization through Independence. It follows the stylistic, technological, and iconographical developments of painting, sculpture, architecture, and textiles as they were created for the subcontinent's major religions - Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Islam. We will examine the relationship between works of art and the political, economic, and social conditions that shaped their production. It will emphasize such themes as religious and cultural diversity, mythology and tradition, and royal and popular art forms. Attention will also be paid to colonialism and the close relationship between collecting, patronage, and empire.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: SAS 239

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Oliver

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 240
Asian Art and Architecture

This course is a survey of the major artistic traditions of Asia-including India, Southeast Asia, China, Korea, and Japan-from Neolithic times to the turn of the twentieth century. It introduces students to Asian art and architecture by exploring the interactions of art, religion, culture, and society, especially how different artistic styles were tied to different intellectual thoughts, political events, and geographical locations. Students are expected to acquire visual skills in recognizing artistic styles, analytical skills in connecting art with its historical contexts, and writing skills in expressing ideas about art. Field trips to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Harvard's Sackler Museum, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and/or the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, depending on available exhibitions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 241
Egyptian Art and Archaeology

The greater Nile Valley has yielded some of the world's most ancient and compelling monuments. In this course we will survey the art and architecture of ancient Egypt from Neolithic times (c. 6000 B.C.) through the Roman period (c. second century A.D.). One class session per month will meet in the Museum of Fine Arts.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Freed

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 243
Cities of the Roman Empire

Gladiators and Vestal Virgins, empresses and emperors, senators and slaves all wrote themselves into history with the monuments they commissioned in the Roman Empire's leading cities. From Spain to Syria and from Egypt to England, their cities bear witness to a "global" system of cultural exchange, one in which London had an amphitheater and Rome had offerings for Egyptian gods. With a focus on ancient urbanism, we will use new digital tools to plot journeys across the empire, to analyze recently excavated art and architecture, and to study sites such as Palmyra now at risk from ongoing warfare. Collections nearby will offer us direct encounters with coins, sculptures, paintings, and mosaics from the empire's many cultural zones.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. Prior coursework in Art History or Classical Civilization recommended.

Instructor: Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 244
Art, Patronage, and Society in Sixteenth-Century Italy

This course will examine the so-called High Renaissance and Mannerist periods in Italy. We will focus in particular on papal Rome, ducal Florence, and republican Venice, and the work of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian, and their followers in relation to the social and cultural currents of the time. Issues such as private patronage, female artists, contemporary sexuality, and the connections between monumental and decorative art will be examined in light of recent scholarship in the field.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 245
House and Home: Domestic Architecture, Interiors, and Material Life in North America, 1600-1900

Domestic architecture is perceived as both a setting for private life and a means of public self-expression. This course will explore the duality of "house and home" by paying close attention to the changing nature of domestic environments in North America from 1600 to 1900. Topics will include the gendering of domestic space; the role of architects, designers, and prescriptive literature in shaping domestic environments; technological change; the marketing and mass production of domestic furnishings; the relationship of houses to their natural environments; and visions for alternative, reform, or utopian housing arrangements. Site visits and walking tours are a central component of the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 246
Collectors, Saints, and Cheese-Eaters in Baroque Italy

This course surveys a selection of the arts in Italy from circa 1575 to circa 1750. The works of artists such as the Carracci, Caravaggio, Bernini, Gentileschi, and Longhi will be examined within their political, social, religious, and economic settings. Particular emphasis will be placed on Rome and the impact of the papacy on the arts, but Bologna, Florence, and Venice will also play a part, especially in regard to the growing interest in scientific enquiry and the production of arts in the courts and for the Grand Tour.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 247
Introduction to Islamic Art and Architecture

What, if anything, makes a work of art or architecture Islamic? Islam has formed an important context for the production and reception of visual and material culture. This course enables students to develop a critical vocabulary in analyzing the arts of the Islamic world. Through the study of a broad range of objects and monuments including mosques, manuscripts, textiles, tiles, and amulets, students learn to hone their formal analysis of both figural and non-figural works of art, as well as their close reading of historical sources that reveal how objects and monuments were made and experienced. As students progress through a chronological and multi-regional overview of works produced from the emergence of Islam in the seventh century to the Early Modern empires, they also gain familiarity with methods for the study of Islamic art and ongoing debates within the field. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the ways in which cultural frameworks including politics, religion, ethnicity, science, and gender shaped the production and reception of images, objects, and monuments within the Islamic world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Alexander Brey

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ARTH 248
Chinese Painting: Theories, Masters, and Principles

Chinese painting can rival the European painting tradition in the quantity and diversity of its output, the number of recorded artists of note, the complexity of aesthetic issues attached to it, and the sophistication of the written literature that accompanies it through the centuries. This course examines Chinese painting from early times to the turn of the twentieth century with an introduction to traditional connoisseurship. Issues to be considered include major themes, styles, formats, and functions of Chinese painting. Special attention is given to imperial patronage; the relationship between painting, calligraphy, and poetry; literati ideal versus professionalism; gender and display; and the tension between tradition and creativity. Trips to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ARTH 249
Japanese Art and Architecture

This course is a survey of the rich visual arts of Japan from the Neolithic period to the turn of the twentieth century with emphasis on painting, ceramics, sculpture, and architecture in the tenth to eighteenth centuries. It explores Japan's early cultural ties to India, China, and Korea and the development of a distinct Japanese national identity and style in narrative hand scrolls and screen paintings. It also examines the emergence of genre in woodblock prints. Special attention is given to the sociopolitical forces, religious thoughts, and intellectual discourses that shaped the representation and expression of these arts.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None..

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ARTH 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 0

Prerequisites:

Instructor:

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ARTH 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

ARTH 251
The Arts in Renaissance Italy Before and After the Black Death

This course surveys a selection of the arts in Renaissance Italy, focusing primarily on Tuscany and central Italy. This period witnessed the rise of the mendicant orders, the devastation of the Black Death, the growth of civic and private patronage, and, finally, the exile of the Medici family, all of which had a profound impact on the visual arts. The work of major artists and workshops will be examined and contextualized within their political, social, and economic settings by readings and discussions of contemporary texts and recent scholarship.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 255
Twentieth-Century Chinese Art

This course examines Chinese art in the socially and politically tumultuous twentieth century,which witnessed the end of imperial China, the founding of the Republic, the rise of the People's Republic, the calamity of Mao's cultural revolution, the impact of the West, and the ongoing social and economic reforms. Critical issues of examination include the encounters of East and West, the tensions of tradition and revolution, the burdens of cultural memory and historical trauma, the interpretations of modernity and modernism, the flowering of avant-garde and experimental art, and the problems of globalization and art markets. The course is designed to develop an understanding of the diverse threads of art and society in twentieth-century China.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 258
The Global Americas, 1400 to Today

This innovative course explores how and why we teach “art” by examining the arts and cultures of North and South America from pre-Hispanic times to the twenty-first century. We will investigate new ways of looking at canonical and non-canonical practices and figures, issues of race and class, and the dynamism of rural life vs. metropolises (like Havana, Miami, São Paolo and Mexico City). Emphasis is on the formative role of international encounters and cross-cultural exchanges with Africa, Europe and Asia. Diverse topics include: caste paintings in Mexico, Native Americans in painting and photography, carnival practices in the Caribbean, the Harlem and Mexican Renaissances, Brazil in the 1920s, biennials, film, and contemporary art. Visits to the Davis Museum and field trips to area galleries and museums.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Greene, Oles

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ARTH 259
The Art and Architecture of the European Enlightenment

This course will present a thematic survey of 18th-century European art and architecture from the reign of Louis XIV to the French Revolution (1660-1789). We will examine works of art in relation to the social, political, and cultural debates of the period, and how artistic practice engaged with new approaches to empiricism, secularism, and political philosophy spurred by the Enlightenment. Topics include French art in the service of absolutism, debates between classicism and the Rococo, public and private spaces of social reform, the Grand Tour and the rediscovery of antiquity, collecting, global trade, and imperialism. We will also consider Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment trends in Spain, Austria, and Great Britain. In Spring 2017, students will also author essays for an online exhibition of Giovanni Battista Piranesi's 18th-century representations of Rome to accompany an actual exhibition of his work at the Davis Museum.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Oliver

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ARTH 262
African American Art

This course will study art made by African Americans from early colonial America to the present. We will also examine images of African Americans by artists of diverse cultural backgrounds. Throughout the course we will analyze construction(s) of subjectivity of African-American identity (black, Negro, colored) as it relates to visual worlds. Although the course is outlined chronologically, the readings and class discussions will revolve around specific themes each week. The course is interdisciplinary, incorporating a variety of social and historical issues, media, and disciplines, including music, film, and literary sources.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Greene

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Not open to students who have taken this course as a topic of ARTH 316.

ARTH 266
New Perspectives on the Global City

This team-taught course introduces students to the study of the global city through an examination of key topics in urban history, planning, architecture, culture, economics and environment. Focusing on major sites from New York to Mumbai, we will look at the ways in which cities have been designed and represented, analyze the use of public and private space by men and women, and explore the construction of urban narratives, both in the past and in the age of cyberculture. The course will include guest lecturers and site visits.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Friedman, McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 289
Nineteenth-Century European Art

This course surveys European art from the French Revolution of 1789 to the Paris Universal Exhibition of 1900. Focusing on such major movements as Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Art Nouveau, we will examine the relationship of art to tradition, revolution, empire, social change, technology, and identity. Emphasis is placed on the representation and experience of modern life, in paintings by David, Goya, Turner, Manet, Seurat, and others, and in venues ranging from political festivals to avant-garde art galleries to London's Crystal Palace. Topics include the expanded audience for art, Orientalism, gender and representation, and the aesthetics of leisure.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 recommended.

Instructor: Oliver

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ARTH 290
Pompeii

Frozen in time by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 C.E., Pompeii's grand public baths, theatres, and amphitheater, its seedy bars and businesses, its temples for Roman and foreign gods, and its lavishly decorated townhomes and villas preserve extremely rich evidence for daily life in the Roman Empire. Lecture topics include urbanism in ancient Italy; the structure and rituals of the Roman home; the styles and themes of Pompeian wall paintings and mosaics; and the expression of non-elite identities. We conclude by analyzing Pompeii's rediscovery in the eighteenth century and the city's current popularity in novels, television episodes, and traveling exhibits.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. ARTH 100 or one unit of Classical Civilization recommended.

Instructor: Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 299
History of the Book from Manuscript to Print

A survey of the evolution of the book, both as a vessel for the transmission of text and image and as evidence of material culture. Through close examination of rare books in Clapp Library's Special Collections, we will explore the social and political forces that influenced the dissemination and reception of printed texts. Lectures will cover the principle techniques and materials of book production from the ancient scroll to the modern codex, including calligraphy, illumination, format and composition, typography, illustration, papermaking, and bookbinding. Weekly reading, discussion, and analysis of specimens will provide the skills needed to develop a critical vocabulary and an investigative model for individual research. Additional sessions on the hand press in the Book Arts Lab and in the Pendleton paper studio.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Rogers (Curator of Special Collections)

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ARTH 309
Seminar: Spiritual Space: Modern Houses of Worship

This course focuses on key examples of spiritual space from the 20th and 21st century, with particular attention to the relationship between historical precedents and Modernist innovations in abstract form across multiple traditions of worship. We will look at what makes for a spiritually inspiring building or landscape, examining the strategies that architects and planners have used in the past. We will take field trips to local sites.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 200, ARTH 228, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 310
The Extraordinary Interior

This course focuses on case studies representing highlights in the history of 20th and 21st-century interior and furniture design. A variety of building types and uses -- domestic, institutional, entertainment, and mixed-use -- will be considered, with an emphasis on the interpretation of style, new and traditional materials, social and cultural values, historical precedents, and the history of collecting.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 228, ARTH 231, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Alice Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 312
Seminar: Topics in Nineteenth-Century Art- Imperial Entanglements: Art and Empire in the Long Nineteenth Century

What were the possibilities and limits of representing foreign lands, cultures, and peoples in the long nineteenth century? How did discourses of empire, race, and power inform or complicate these representations? This course examines Europe's imperial and colonial engagements with India, the Pacific, North Africa, and the West Indies from 1750-1900 and representations of these engagements in the visual realm. Thematically and methodologically driven, a comparative approach will be taken to theories of travel, colonialism, and cross-cultural interactions. Such theories include, but are not limited to, Orientalism, postcolonialism, transnationlism, and their attendant critiques.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Oliver

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ARTH 313
Seminar: Eurasia: Empires, Merchants, and Missionaries (1600 - 1800)

This course examines forms of artistic and material exchange across the diverse cultures of Europe and Asia in the early modern era (c.1600-1800). Its aim is to realign Western Europe's art and history of the early modern period in relation to its continental neighbors. Case studies will be drawn from the Ottoman and Mughal Empires, the Dutch Republic, the British East India Company, and many more. We will examine how trade networks united various artistic traditions, and how artisans, merchants, missionaries and other intermediaries reinterpreted and disseminated practices of representation across geographic and cultural boundaries.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 13

Prerequisites: Recommended ARTH 100 or by permission of instructor.

Instructor: Oliver

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ARTH 317
Historic Preservation: Theory and Practice

Using the campus of Wellesley College as a case study, this course will explore the theory and practice of historic preservation. Beginning with a focus on the history of preservation in the United States, we will trace the development of legal, economic, public policy, and cultural frameworks that have shaped attitudes and approaches toward the preservation of our built environment. To ground these theoretical discussions, we will use the Wellesley College campus as a laboratory for understanding the benefits and challenges of historic preservation. Students will engage in both individual and group projects that will emphasize field study of buildings and landscapes, archival research, planning, and advocacy. The course is designed for Architecture and Art History majors, but could also be of interest to students in History, American Studies, Environmental Studies and Political Science.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 13

Prerequisites: ARTH 200 or permission of instructor.

Instructor: McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 318
Seminar: New England Arts and Architecture

This seminar will introduce students to the visual and material culture of New England from the period of European contact to the end of the twentieth century, with particular emphasis on Boston and environs. Course readings, lectures, and discussion will address the broad range of artistic expression from decorative arts to cultural landscapes, placing them in their social, political, and economic contexts as well as in the larger context of American art and architecture. A major theme of the course will be the question of New England's development as a distinct cultural region and the validity of regionalism as a category of analysis. The course will include a number of required field trips to New England museums and cultural institutions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

ARTH 320
Seminar: Frank Lloyd Wright: Modern Architecture and New Ways of Living

This seminar will examine the buildings and theories of Frank Lloyd Wright, with a particular focus on two themes: Wright's designs for progressive and feminist clients across the long span of his career; and his relationship to the Modern Movement in Europe and the Americas.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: ARTH 200, ARTH 228 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ARTH 321
Seminar. Making Space: Gender, Sexuality and the Design of Houses

Focusing on case studies drawn from European and American history and contemporary practice, this discussion seminar will look at the ways in which normative notions of gender and sexuality have shaped the conventions of domestic architecture for specific cultures and time periods. The course will also focus on outliers, anomalies and queer spaces, examining the roles played by unconventional architects, clients, and users of houses in changing notions of public and private space and creating new ways of living. Readings will be drawn from feminist theory, queer studies, and architectural history. Weekly oral reports on key concepts, texts and/or buildings and in-class discussion are required in addition to written research papers.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 228 or a 300-level course in architectural history or urban studies or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Alice Friedman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTH 322
Seminar: The Bauhaus

This seminar considers Staatliches Bauhaus, the school of architecture, art, and design that was founded in Weimar Germany at the end of World War I, closed under National Socialism in the mid-30s, and reestablished in Chicago in 1937. Without knowing it, you are surrounded and inspired by Bauhaus-inspired designs, theories, and products every day. The class considers the historical position of the Bauhaus; examines the school's curriculum and faculty (among them, Paul Klee, Walter Gropius, Wassily Kandinsky, Marianne Brandt), philosophy, and practices; studies contemporaneous developments and contacts in the international art and design world; and examines the legacies of the Bauhaus in architecture, photography, design, city planning, and paintings. The seminar provides an integrative examination of visual arts disciplines, and it brings together interdisciplinary approaches to the historical movement.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: By permission of the instructor only. Preference will be given to senior Art History and Architecture majors and minors.

Instructor: Berman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 328
Dining with Michelangelo: Art and Food in Renaissance Italy

This seminar will analyze the role of food in the art and life of early modern Italy. We will examine the historic and economic context of food as the basis of our investigation of its representation in paintings, sculptures, and works on paper from circa 1300 to 1800. This will entail a close look at food as subject and symbol, as well as the material culture surrounding its production and consumption. The seminar will investigate illustrated herbals and cookbooks in Special Collections, dining habits and etiquette, and food as sexual metaphor through a wide range of interdisciplinary sources; Wellesley's Botanic Gardens will grow Italian fruits, vegetables, and herbs for us to incorporate in Renaissance-era recipes.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Previous courses in European art, history, or literature recommended but not required.

Instructor: Jacqueline Marie Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 330
Seminar: Italian Renaissance Art - Birth, Marriage, and Death in Renaissance Italy

During the Italian Renaissance, major family events like childbirth, marriage, and death were marked by both works of art and oftentimes elaborate rituals. In this seminar we will examine childbirth trays, marriage chests, painted and sculpted portraits, and funerary monuments, as well as a wide range of additional domestic objects that surrounded people in their everyday life. These objects will be related to contemporary monumental and public art, literature, account books, and legislation, as well as recent scholarship in art history, social history, and women's studies, to provide insight into Renaissance art and life.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ARTH 332
Seminar: Art, Travel, and Sex in Casanova's Europe

This seminar will analyze the world of Giacomo Casanova (1725-1798), the Venetian author, diplomat, traveler, and infamous libertine. Casanova lived during a period of critical changes to artistic, political, and social life that shaped early modern Europe. We will examine his biography in this context, incorporating a wide range of primary and secondary sources to understand his role in history. This seminar is linked to the exhibition "Casanova: The Seduction of Europe," on display at Boston's Museum of Fine Arts in Fall 2018; several sessions will be held at the MFA, while others will examine resources in Wellesley's Special Collections, Book Arts Lab, and Davis Museum.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 13

Prerequisites: Previous courses in European art, history, or literature recommended but not required.

Instructor: Musacchio

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 334
Latin American Art

This introductory survey explores Latin American and Latinx art of the 20th and 21st centuries. Through a series of case studies we will investigate how these painters, photographers, muralists and others engaged international currents (from symbolism to conceptual art) while also addressing local themes, such as national and racial identity, class difference, gender inequality, political struggle, and state violence. We will also cover the history of collecting and exhibiting Latin American and Latinx art. This course has no prerequisites; students without an art history background are welcome. Advanced students who enroll in 334 will have additional assignments, including a research essay. In Spring 2019, the course will be tied to a major exhibition of Latin American and Latinx art at the Davis Museum.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: At least two art history courses.

Instructor: Oles

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 335/ MUS 333
Seminar: The Arts of Dissent

The visual arts play a critical role in shaping identity and formulating opinion. Recognizing the power of images and performance, participants in social and political movements enlist the arts in support of their work. In this case-study based seminar, we will explore ways in which the visual arts have been central features of social protest movements in the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. The class will take a trip to New York. In some meetings, we will work with Studio Art instructors to create and analyze student production.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: MUS 333

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Berman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ARTH 336
Seminar: Museum Studies

This seminar will examine the art museum through perspectives around the "Politics of Presentation." It will consider the evolution of the institution and its architectures, the philosophical and social implications of categorizing, collecting and displaying, ethical issues in museum practice, the competing demands of new and traditional stakeholders, and contemporary challenges. Using the Davis Museum's permanent collections galleries as one primary resource, students will investigate the historical, critical, and museological contexts for collecting strategies, exhibition development, and audience engagement, and examine museums at the nexus of curatorial practice, collecting strategy, patronage, and pedagogy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 and permission of the instructor required. Preference given to senior art majors.

Instructor: Fischman and Fluke

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternating years.

ARTH 337
Seminar: The Song Imperial Painting Academy

The Imperial Painting Academy of the Song Dynasty China (960-1279), founded in 984, was the first of its kind in the history of world art. This seminar investigates the nature of imperial patronage and the institution and achievements of the Painting Academy (comparable to those of the Italian Renaissance art) in relation to the Song Empire. The seminar attempts to identify how exactly a particular imperial commission was initiated and carried out through critical reading of primary sources (in translation) that include artists biographies and case studies. Issues of connoisseurship and the relationship of painting/image and poetry/word are also examined.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to junior and senior students or by approval of instructor.

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 339
Seminar: Who Was Frida Kahlo?

At her death in 1954, Frida Kahlo was a somewhat marginal figure, but today she is one of the most famous artists in the world, and the subject of a vast bibliography, both academic and popular, print and digital, accurate and inaccurate. This seminar will unpack Kahlo's life and work using a variety of critical and disciplinary approaches, from connoisseurship to feminism, to better understand the results of her complex self-invention. We will place her paintings in their historical context, but we will also study how she has been interpreted by curators and biographers, artists and filmmakers, fakers and advertisers. More generally, the seminar will also help you hone your ability to conduct art historical research, and analyze, interpret, and write about art, as well as think critically in response to scholarly literature and pertinent methodologies. Finally, you will be encouraged to develop the skills necessary to present oral information effectively and professionally.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Oles

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 341
Seminar: The Landscape Painting of China, Korea, and Japan

Landscape or shanshui (literally "mountains" and "rivers" in Chinese) rose as an independent and major painting category in the tenth century in East Asia and is among the great traditions of world art. How did it develop so early? What did it mean? How was it used? Why is landscape still a popular subject in modern East Asian art? Following the development of landscape painting from the early periods to the twentieth century, the course explores such issues as landscape and national development, landscape and power, landscape as representation of nature, landscape as images of the mind, and the tension of tradition and creativity in painting landscape. Comparisons will be made with Dutch, English, French, and American landscape painting to provide a global perspective.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 13

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in art history or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ARTH 343
Seminar: Roman Monuments: Memory and Metamorphosis

From triumphal arches to souvenirs, and from tombstones to public portraits, ancient Romans mastered the art of commemoration. Focusing on a different kind of monument each week, we will explore how Romans negotiated power through designs and dedications. In light of current debates about contested memorials, we will analyze ancient precedents for destroying or rewriting dedications to condemned emperors. We will also ask how modern commissions, such as New York's Washington Square Arch, draw on the authority of antiquity. Students will leave the course with a deeper understanding of how monuments work and how the Roman Empire's monuments still shape how we commemorate today.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in Art History or Classical Civilization or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTH 345
House and Home: Domestic Architecture, Interiors, and Material Life in North America, 1600-1900

Domestic architecture is perceived as both a setting for private life and a means of public self-expression. This course will explore the duality of "house and home" by paying close attention to the changing nature of domestic environments in North America from 1600 to 1900. Topics will include the gendering of domestic space; the role of architects, designers, and prescriptive literature in shaping domestic environments; technological change; the marketing and mass production of domestic furnishings; the relationship of houses to their natural environments; and visions for alternative, reform, or utopian housing arrangements. Site visits and walking tours are a central component of the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 recommended. Students who have taken ARTH 245 may not take ARTH 345.

Instructor: Martha McNamara

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: This course is offered at the 200 and at the 300 level. Students in the 300 level section of the course will be expected to complete additional work.

ARTH 346
Seminar: Poetic Painting in China, Korea, and Japan

Poetic painting is a conspicuous visual phenomenon in East Asian art that at its best is technically superlative and deeply moving. This seminar investigates the development of this lyric mode of painting first in China and then in Korea and Japan from the eighth century to the twentieth through the practices of scholar-officials, emperors and empresses, masters in and outside of the Imperial Painting Academy, literati artists, and modern intellectuals. Literary ideals and artistic skills, tradition and creativity, patronage and identity, censorship and freedom of expression, and other tensions between paintings and poetry/poetry theories will be examined.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in art history or permission of the instructor..

Instructor: Liu

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ARTH 347
Seminar. Beyond Iconoclasm: Seeing the Sacred in Islamic Visual Cultures

The production and use of sacred images has provoked a wide variety of responses within the Islamic world. This class explores how sacred images have been created, viewed, destroyed, and reused within Islamic cultural contexts ranging from the Arab-Muslim conquests of the seventh century to the present day. Rather than progressing chronologically, it examines sacred images from thematic and theoretical perspectives. Topics include iconoclasm and aniconism, depictions of sacred figures and places, talismans and images on objects imbued with divine agency, and articulations of new attitudes towards images at key historical moments.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Prior coursework in Art History or Middle Eastern Studies, or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Alexander Brey

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTH 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ARTH 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

ARTH 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 2

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ARTH 369
Seminar: Conservation Studies: The Materials and Techniques of Painting and Sculpture

This seminar will provide an introduction to the materials and techniques used by painters and sculptors. Units on painting will focus on ancient painting (from the earliest cave paintings through ancient Egypt and classical antiquity); wall paintings from various parts of the world, with emphasis on the fresco painting technique; Western easel painting of the medieval, Renaissance, and later periods; traditional Asian paintings on silk and paper supports; and modern painting. Units on sculpture will focus on metal and ceramics, using artifacts from many cultures and periods of time, ranging from ancient China to the Italian Renaissance and later. Modern sculptural materials, including plastics, will also be introduced.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: ARTH 100 or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Newman

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered every three years.

ARTH 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 2

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTH 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ARTH 373/ CLCV 373
Antiquities Today: The Politics of Replication

New technologies that enable the 3D scanning and fabrication of art and architecture have become integral in attempts to combat the decay, destruction, and disputed ownership of ancient works. Our seminar contextualizes the development of these current approaches within the longer history of collecting and replicating artifacts from the ancient Mediterranean. We will think critically about the role that replicated antiquities play in site and object preservation, college and museum education, and the negotiation of international political power. Potential case studies include the Bust of Nefertiti, the Parthenon Marbles, the Venus de Milo, and the Arch of Palmyra, all of which now exist globally in multiple digital and material iterations. The seminar will culminate in a critique of the digitization and replication of Wellesley’s own antiquities collections.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CLCV 373

Prerequisites: Prior college-level coursework in Art History and/or Classical Civilization.

Instructor: Cassibry

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTS 105
Drawing I

A foundational course in observational drawing with attention to the articulation of line, shape, form, gesture, perspective, and value. Studio work introduces a range of traditional drawing tools and observational methods while exploring a variety of approaches to image making and visual expression. In-class drawing exercises, weekly homework assignments, and group critiques address a range of subjects including the human figure. Aimed at firstyears and sophomores and those considering majors in Studio Art, Art History, Media Arts and Sciences, or Architecture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: None. Open to First years, Sophomores, and Juniors. Seniors only by permission of the instructor and should add themselves to the waitlist.

Instructor: Rivera (Spring), TBA (Fall, Spring)

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Required for majors and minors in Studio Art as well as majors in Architecture.

ARTS 108/ CAMS 138
Photography I

Photo I is a foundational studio course exploring key methods and concepts in photography. Technical skills will be addressed through camera work, lighting, and traditional darkroom practices. Studio assignments, readings, discussions, lectures, gallery visits, and critiques will help students build the conceptual, aesthetic, and critical skills essential to understanding photography's broader role in contemporary art, history, and society. Aimed for first year and sophomore students, and those pursuing majors in Studio Art, MAS, or CAMS.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 8

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 138

Prerequisites: None. Open to Firstyears and Sophomores. Juniors and Seniors by permission of the instructor and should add themselves to the waitlist.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Meets Production requirement for CAMS major.

ARTS 109
Two-Dimensional Design

This foundational studio course addresses the issue of composition in two-dimensional media. It focuses on the fundamental elements of visual design (e.g., line, shape, value, space, color) and their compositional impact. Studio projects emphasize visual problem-solving skills as a means of achieving more effective communication, with some attention to the issues of typography. Assignments explore a range of media, including digital processes.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: None. Open to First years, Sophomores, and Juniors. Seniors only by permission of the instructor and should add themselves to the waitlist.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTS 110
4D Design Intro to New Media

This introductory, time-based media production course explores motion graphics, performance art, social practice, installation, Internet art, game design, animation, and the expanding digital domain of 'new media.' The focus will be on experimental, artistic practice using various methods of animation, video, and motion graphics. Studio projects will utilize Photoshop, Final Cut, Maya, Animate, and other imaging and audio programs. Aimed for first and second-year students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: None. Open to first and second-year students, others must have permission of instructor.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTS 111
Color Theory

This introductory course focuses on the topic of color through observation, experimentation, readings, discussion, and studio projects in various media. Theories of color and its innumerable applications will be considered from various perspectives including science, philosophy, cultural and social studies, history, and perception. Students will learn to analyze the role of color in their work, leading to more effective and expressive work at the upper levels.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: None. Open to First years, Sophomores, and Juniors. Seniors only by permission of the instructor and should add themselves to the waitlist.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTS 112
Introduction to Book Studies

This new studio course addresses the theoretical and practical aspects of the manufacture, publication, distribution, and survival of the book. Studio projects explore themes such as the evolution of the book form, the sequencing of image and text, and the relationship between form and content. Class sessions in the Papermaking Studio and Special Collections will augment intensive studio work in Clapp Library's Book Arts Lab. Readings, field trips, and studio projects culminate in a book-based studio research project. The knowledge base and skills acquired in this course can be applied to advanced coursework in a variety of disciplines.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None. Open to First years, Sophomores, and Juniors. Seniors only by permission of the instructor and should add themselves to the waitlist.

Instructor: Ruffin

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTS 113
Three-Dimensional Design

This introductory course explores the basic formal and spatial considerations when working with three-dimensional structure and form. Studio projects incorporate a range of materials and methods of visualization. Outside assignments and class discussions are aimed toward helping students enhance their creativity and spatial awareness while acquiring sensitivity for placement, process, and materials. Required for Architecture majors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: None. Open to First years, Sophomores, and Juniors. Seniors only by permission of the instructor and should add themselves to the waitlist.

Instructor: Mowbray (Fall)

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTS 165/ CAMS 135
Introduction to the Moving Image

This introductory course explores video as an art form. Organized around a series of assignments designed to survey a range of production strategies, the course is a primer to the technical and conceptual aspects of video production and to its historical, critical, and technical discourse. Relationships between video and television, film, installation, and performance art are investigated emphasizing video as a critical intervention in social and visual arts contexts. Weekly readings, screenings, discussions and critique, explore contemporary issues in video and help students develop individual aesthetic and critical skills. Practical knowledge is integrated through lighting, video/sound production and editing workshops.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 7

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 135

Prerequisites: Open to First years and Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors by permission of instructor.

Instructor: Joskowicz

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Meets the Production requirement for CAMS majors. Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ARTS 207
Sculpture I

This intermediate level studio course addresses a range of sculptural approaches by way of various materials, including clay, wood, metal, plaster, and cardboard. Each of these materials will be used to explore a specific technique or sculptural method such as carving, modeling, or fabrication. By the end of the semester, emphasis shifts towards the completion of more independent projects and conceptual questions regarding the tangible impact of materials, functions, and histories on sculptural artworks.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: ARTS 105 or 113 or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Mowbray

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Strongly recommended for Architecture majors.

ARTS 208/ CAMS 238
Photography II: The Digital/Analog Rift

Building on the foundation of Photo I, this intermediate course aims to strengthen students' conceptual photographic acumen while introducing advanced studio and location lighting, digital retouching, inkjet printing, and basic multimedia production. Assignments address contemporary and historic theories of photography as contemporary art and the aesthetic and cultural implications of the ubiquity of digital photography. Emphasis is on developing project-based photography through cultivating research, planning, conceptual, and production skills.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 238

Prerequisites: ARTS 108/CAMS 138, or ARTS 221, or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Van Beckum

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTS 216
Spatial Investigations

An intermediate studio course designed for architecture and studio art majors wishing to strengthen their visual and spatial responsiveness. Class work explores various forms of drawing in two and three dimensions, including basic architectural rendering, fixed viewpoint perspective, mapping, modeling, some digital work, and temporary site-built installations. Following a series of studio projects and discussions considering issues of space and place, the physicality of space, and our historic relationship to architecture, each student produces a self-directed final project. Strongly recommended for architecture majors before enrolling in the architectural design sequence at MIT.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTS 105 or ARTS 113.

Instructor: Mowbray

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Strongly recommended for Architecture majors before enrolling in architectural design sequence at MIT.

ARTS 217
Life Drawing

Understanding the human form through sustained observational drawing from the nude model. A highly structured drawing course that balances empathetic, gestural awareness with careful visual analysis and tactile exploration of wet and dry media. Ongoing drawing exercises with the model are complemented by readings, discussions, and projects exploring figurative patterns of representation in art as well as shifting cultural conceptions of the body. Recommended for architecture majors as well as those interested in the figure as an expressive vehicle in new media.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: ARTS 105

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: May be repeated for degree credit.

ARTS 218
Painting I

An intermediate studio course centered on the fundamental issues of painting, emphasizing color, composition, and paint manipulation through direct observation and response. Studio assignments, presentations, discussions and critiques help students gain technical skills, visual sophistication, and critical awareness of the medium. Students paint from a variety of subjects, including the self-portrait, nude model, and still life. May be repeated for degree credit.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: ARTS 105 or 109 or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTS 219
Print Methods: Lithography/Screenprint

This intermediate level studio course centers on planographic methods of making prints by hand, from stone lithography to screen printing. Students develop critical awareness and creative flexibility working with the image multiplied. Projects incorporate image/text juxtapositions, color layering, patterning, photo-digital processing, and vector graphics. Field trips, readings, and collaborative exchanges complement the individual studio assignments. Recommended for students interested in design, architecture, media arts, and book studies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: One of the following - ARTS 105, ARTS 106, ARTS 108, ARTS 109 - or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: ARTS 219, ARTS 220, ARTS 222 and ARTS 223 are complementary
courses that may be elected in any order.

ARTS 220
Print Methods: Intaglio/Relief

A studio exploration of intaglio and relief printing methods, including copperplate etching, collograph, and woodcut. Students develop visual and graphic flexibility through hands-on projects considering image sequences, pattern, text, and multiples. Several projects address color and typography and/or incorporate digital methods. Students participate in a collaborative print exchange in addition to completing individual projects. ARTS 219, ARTS 220, and ARTS 221 are complementary graphic arts courses and may be elected in any order.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: One of the following - ARTS 105, ARTS 108, ARTS 109, ARTS 112, ARTS 115 - or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: McGibbon

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: ARTS 219, ARTS 220, ARTS 222 and ARTS 223 are complementary graphic arts courses and may be elected in any order.

ARTS 221/ CAMS 239
Digital Imaging

Introduction to artistic production through electronic imaging, manipulation, and output. Emphasis on expression, continuity, and sequential structuring of visuals through the integration of image, text, and motion. Image output for print, screen, and adaptive surfaces are explored in conjunction with production techniques of image capture, lighting, and processing. Lectures and screenings of historic and contemporary uses of technology for artistic and social application of electronic imaging.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 239

Prerequisites: Any 100-level ARTS course.

Instructor: Olsen (Fall), TBA (Spring)

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ARTS 222
Print Methods: Typography/Book Arts

This intermediate studio course is centered on the relationship between text and image through letterpress relief printing techniques and handmade book structures. Studio projects will include the production of limited edition artist's books that focus on the interplay of two and three dimensions in the book form. Emphasis will be placed on creative problem solving within the limitations of technology, and on the importance of the act of revision. Class sessions in the Papermaking Studio and Special Collections will augment intensive studio work in Clapp Library's Book Arts Lab.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: One of the following - ARTS 105, ARTS 108, ARTS 109, ARTS 112, ARTS 115 - or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Ruffin

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTS 223
Alternative Print Methods: The Graphic Impulse

This intermediate studio course explores new hybrid approaches to graphic production, integrating traditional and new print technologies in experimental ways. Students develop greater visual and conceptual range in the Dactyl Press studios while developing iterative projects involving color, text-based art, and alternative distribution/display formats such as zines and site-based installations. Some projects explore photo-digital print processes, laser-cutting, and vector graphics. Readings, discussions, critiques, demonstrations, and collaborative exchanges consider the ongoing impact of media culture. Especially recommended for students interested in design, architecture, media arts, and book studies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: One of the following - ARTS 105, ARTS 108/CAMS 138, ARTS 109/CAMS 139, ARTS 112, or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: ARTS 219, ARTS 220, ARTS 222 and ARTS 223 are complementary courses that may be elected in any order.

ARTS 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

ARTS 255/ CAMS 255
Dynamic Interface Design

Critical examination of the expanding field of information and interface design for interactive media. Emphasis will be on effective visual communication, information design, and creative content within online media. Hands-on production will focus on design methods, multimedia Web, vector-based media, and dynamic audio. Screenings and discussions on contemporary practices, theoretical, artistic, and cultural issues.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 255

Prerequisites: ARTS 108 /CAMS 138, ARTS 109 and CS 110 or CS 111.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTS 260/ CAMS 230
Moving Image Studio

Creative exploration of the moving image as it relates to digital methods of animation, video, and motion graphics. Hands-on production of audio, image, text, and time-based media synthesis, with a conceptual emphasis on nonlinear narrative, communication design, and visual expression. Screenings and lectures on historical and contemporary practices, coupled with readings and discussions of the theoretical, artistic, and cultural issues in the moving image.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 230

Prerequisites: ARTS 108/CAMS 138, ARTS 165/CAMS 135, or ARTS 221/CAMS 239.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ARTS 265/ CAMS 235
Intermediate Video: Experimental Production

An intermediate level studio that guides students through different approaches to experimental video production while challenging linear narrative and documentary conventions. Students experiment with non-narrative approaches to content, structure, and technique. Investigations of space and performance are informed by poetry, literature, sound, color, fragmentation, and abstraction. Building upon the historical legacy of the moving image, students incorporate self-exploration, social critique, and manipulation of raw experience into an aesthetic form. This course explores the independent media and video fields as students develop independent video projects and articulate their artistic process through a series of presentations and critiques.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 235

Prerequisites: ARTS 165/CAMS 135 or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Joskowicz

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTS 307
Advanced Sculptural Practices

An exploration of sculptural concepts utilizing a variety of materials and methods. This course will integrate the constructed and tangible, with process and practice, culminating in the development of independent projects. Emphasis will be placed on conceptual considerations, such as audience, context/location, materials, functionality, and histories.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: At least one 200 level ARTS course completed at Wellesley.

Instructor: Mowbray

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTS 308/ CAMS 338
Photography III

Advanced explorations of aesthetic and content issues through the use of both traditional light-sensitive and digital methodologies. Advanced photographic techniques and equipment will be presented in response to each student's work. Continued emphasis is placed on research into the content and context of the photographic image in contemporary practice through visiting artist events as well as gallery, museum, and studio visits.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 338

Prerequisites: ARTS 108/CAMS 138, and either ARTS 208/CAMS 238 or ARTS 221/CAMS 239, or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not offered in 2019-20.

ARTS 313/ CAMS 313
Virtual Form

Introduction to the design and production of three-dimensional objects and spaces using industry-standard modeling software. Overview of basic modeling, surface design, and camera techniques. Emphasis on creative application of the media, in relation to architectural, experimental, and time-based forms. Screenings and lectures on traditional and contemporary practices, coupled with readings and discussions of the theoretical, artistic, and cultural issues in the virtual world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 313

Prerequisites: ARTS 113. Strong computer familiarity needed.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ARTS 314
Advanced Drawing

An intensive studio course for juniors and seniors, considering the visual, conceptual, and spatial issues driving contemporary drawing practices and assumptions. This course explores the act of drawing as a speculative and critical thinking process as well as a visual language. Class work addresses various observational and technical methods as well as the intersection of drawing and sound. In-depth studio critiques, field trips, and interaction with visiting artists and musicians augment the projects. Following a period of intense studio exploration and dialogue, each student develops and hones an independent, cohesive body of work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTS 105 and at least one 200-level studio course in two-dimensional media.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: ARTS 314 may be repeated, ordinarily for a maximum of two semesters.

ARTS 315
Advanced Painting

A project-based course that examines in depth the history and the processes of painting. This studio provides an opportunity for advanced students to share their painting practice and benefit from intensive and well-informed critical dialogue. The group interacts in a seminar fashion, in which topics and problems are presented and students are asked to develop independent projects examining them. Students explore painting as object, painting in space, site specificity, and consider the impact of digital technologies on image making. Each student will continue to explore elements pertaining to the construction of painting while developing an independent vocabulary and a substantial, cohesive body of work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ARTS 218 or permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ARTS 317
Advanced Independent Senior Projects

Part I of a year-long seminar supporting advanced studio students, divided into one half-credit course offered during the Fall semester and one half-credit in the Spring. This methodology-based course functions as an overlay to advanced studio projects underway in the context of 300 level studio classes and thesis projects. Students enrolled in the course will have access to independent workspace for the year and benefit from sustained dialogue and studio critiques with a range of faculty and visiting artists, including those hosted through the Frank Williams Visiting Artist Lecture Series. This course is mandatory for all Studio Art majors and strongly recommended for Studio Art minors and related visual arts majors.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ARTS 105, 2 other 100 level studio courses, at least two 200 level studio art courses or one 200 level and one 300 level studio art courses.

Instructor: Rivera

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Each semester of ARTS 317 and ARTS 318 earns one half unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

ARTS 318
Advanced Independent Senior Projects

Part II of a year-long seminar supporting advanced students, divided into one half-credit offered during the fall semester and one half-credit course in the spring leading towards the senior exhibition in May. This methodology-based course functions as an overlay to advanced projects underway in the context of advanced studio classes or thesis projects. Students enrolled in the course will have access to independent workspace and benefit from sustained dialogue and studio critiques with a range of faculty and visiting artists, including those hosted through the Frank Williams Visiting Artists Lecture Series. This course is mandatory for all Studio Art majors and strongly recommended for Studio Art minors and related visual arts majors.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ARTS 317

Instructor: Rivera

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Each semester of ARTS 317 and ARTS 318 earns one half unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

ARTS 321/ CAMS 321
Advanced New Media

Various topics in New Media are explored through research, creative activity, and theoretical discussion. Topics address historical as well as contemporary issues that bridge art and technology. This is an advanced level New Media course giving students the opportunity to focus in on their craft and concepts as well as receive critiques from other students with similar goals. Lectures on the historic and contemporary practices of intermedia artists, designers, thinkers and scientists, coupled with readings and discussions. Collaboration will be encouraged between, Studio Art, Music, CAMS, Media Arts, Theater and Computer Science.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 321

Prerequisites: Two 200-level courses in ARTS, CAMS, or MAS.

Instructor: Olsen

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: ARTS 321/CAMS 321 may be repeated, ordinarily for a maximum of two semesters.

ARTS 322
Advanced Print Concepts

What are graphic conventions and how does graphic studio production shape contemporary artistic inquiry? A conceptually driven studio aimed for juniors and seniors who have successfully completed at least one print, architecture, or media arts course at the 200 level. Readings, discussions, and field trips address sequential imagery, text/image interactions and the use of multiplicity in a range of visual formats, from the artist book to the site-based installation. Following a period of interactive studio experimentation and dialogue, each student develops a comprehensive self-directed project. May be repeated for degree credit.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: One of the following - ARTS 219, ARTS 220, ARTS 221/CAMS 239, ARTS 222, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: McGibbon

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally alternates with ARTS 323 every third semester. Not offered in 2019-20.

ARTS 323
Advanced Graphic Projects: Theories of Travel and the Print

Print studios are packed with metaphors of travel, and for good reason: the movement of an image from here to there is the central narrative guiding all graphic production. This advanced studio course is aimed for juniors and seniors able to work independently in at least one print medium and ready to inaugurate our new print studio with in-depth projects considering notions of travel and transformation. Students interact with visiting artists who address theories of travel, while developing sustained, self-directed projects using the Dactyl Press facilities. Studio projects will be complemented by discussions, critiques, readings, and field trips.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: One of the following - ARTS 219, ARTS 220, ARTS 221/CAMS 239, ARTS 222, or ARTS 223.

Instructor: McGibbon

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally alternates with ARTS 322 every third semester. Not Offered in 2019-20.

ARTS 324
The Space In-Between: Filling the Gap Between 2D and 3D

This advanced studio reconsiders the space between 2 dimensional and 3 dimensional modes of thinking and visual production. Architects and visual artists often explore similar conceptual territory and the distinction between these fields has become increasingly blurred. This course provides students with an opportunity to move between 2 and 3 dimensional projects and patterns of thought with greater confidence and understanding. The course combines theoretical discourse with studio projects while challenging traditional disciplinary boundaries.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: ARTS 105

Instructor: Mowbray

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally alternates with ARTS 307. Not Offered in 2019-20.

ARTS 336/ MUS 336
From Mark to Sound, From Sound to Mark: Music, Drawing, and Architecture

This advanced, project-based course is aimed at students able to work independently in one of two broad categories of contemporary art-making: Drawing (including visual art, new media art, architecture, sculpture, and/or art theory) and Sound (composition, performance, analog or digital sound production, and/or sound studies). Together we will explore elements such as rhythm, line, space, and composition from the perspectives of sound studies and drawing, focusing in particular on the graphic mark. Students will interact with several visiting artists, and will visit working artists in their studios and observe relevant art installations and performances. Students will develop semester-long studio projects, which will be supplemented by discussions, critiques, and readings.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: ARTS 336

Prerequisites: Any of ARTS 105, ARTS 109, ARTS 113, MUS 100, MUS 122, ARTH 100, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Johnson (Music) and Rivera (Art)

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ARTS 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ARTS 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ARTS 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ARTS 365/ CAMS 335
Advanced Video Production

This advanced-level class centers on the production and critique of individual film and video work, along with an ongoing schedule of screenings, readings, and discussions that investigate various positions from artists and directors on the dynamics of space on screen. Our focus will be on the construction of cinematic space as a formal and conceptual component of storytelling. Using poetry, film, and literature as guides to navigating both constructed and conceptual landscapes, student projects will oscillate between portraiture and social documentary. Formally, this class explores advanced strategies of image and sound manipulation, both technical and conceptual. It covers pre-production planning (storyboards and scripting), refinement of digital editing techniques, visual effects, post-production, as well as audio and sonic components. Students will develop semester-long video/film projects and will articulate their artistic process through a series of presentations and critiques over the semester.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 335

Prerequisites: ARTS 165/CAMS 135, ARTS 265/CAMS 235, and permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Joskowicz

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ARTS 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: ARTS 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor: Staff

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a studio faculty member, with assessments from the full studio art faculty. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ASPH 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ASPH 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the director.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ASPH 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ASPH 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ASTR 100
Life in the Universe

This course investigates the origin of life on the Earth and the prospects for finding life elsewhere in the cosmos, and begins with an overview of the Earth's place in the solar system and the universe. The course examines the early history of the Earth and the development of life, changes in the sun that affect the Earth, characteristics of the other objects in our solar system and their potential for supporting life, the detection of planets around stars other than the sun, and the search for extraterrestrial life. Our exploration of our place in the universe will include some nighttime observing at our on-campus observatory.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 36

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Instructor: Watters, McLeod

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ASTR 107
Exploring the Cosmos: Introductory Astronomy w/Lab

This course provides an overview of the Universe through the lens of the physical principles that help us to probe it from right here on our puny planetary perch. Topics include stars and their planetary companions, the lives and deaths of stars, black holes, galaxies, and the origin and fate of the Universe. Regularly-scheduled weekly daytime laboratories cover both naked-eye astronomy (e.g. the motions of the Sun and stars) and techniques of modern astronomy (e.g. digital imagery). Additional required nighttime sessions (scheduled according to the weather) guide students through their own observations of the sky with both naked eyes and the historic and modern telescopes of Whitin Observatory. This course serves as a gateway to more advanced courses in our astronomy curriculum.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 28

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. High school physics strongly recommended.

Instructor: McLeod, Watters

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: This course is open to first years and sophomores.

ASTR 110Y/ PHYS 111Y
First Year Seminar: Einstein and the Dark Universe

This seminar explores Einstein's theory of relativity and two fundamental puzzles in physics: dark matter and dark energy. Taught in a hands-on/workshop format, students will carry out an experimental test of relativity, as well as computational analyses which reveal that the Universe expansion is accelerating and that 80% of the matter in the Universe is fundamentally different from all known particles in the Standard Model of particle physics. We will also discuss the ongoing experimental search for the elusive dark matter particle, as well as efforts to understand the nature of dark energy. No prior physics background is assumed. We will make use of high school algebra and geometry in our work. Not to be counted toward the minimum physics major or to fulfill the physics entrance requirement for medical school.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: ASTR 110Y

Prerequisites: Open to first-year students only. Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Instructor: James Battat

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ASTR 200
Exoplanetary systems

This course will focus on exoplanets and the stellar systems they inhabit. Topics include exoplanet demographics, techniques of discovery and characterization, models of formation and evolution, and potential for future telescopes to uncover signs of atmospheric chemistry and habitability. Students will practice application of physical principles, build data analysis skills, and be introduced to astronomical literature. Students will also make exoplanet transit observations with our on-campus telescope and will model the resulting light curve to ascertain properties of a real exoplanetary system.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ASTR 107 or ASTR 101; or ASTR 100 with permission of instructor.

Instructor: McLeod

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ASTR 202
Hands-on Planetary Exploration with Laboratory

Design your own planetary mission and build your own scientific probe in this project-based course about the practice of planetary exploration! Students will learn about the science and technology of exploring extreme environments through  studying the development of a historical planetary mission and by building their own instrumented probe to investigate a challenging environment such as the Earth's lower atmosphere or the bottom of Lake Waban. Depending on their role in the project, students can gain experience with a wide range of new skills, such as how to assemble and test electronic circuits, computer programming, and data analysis.  

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Any 100-level science course (including CS). High school physics recommended.

Instructor: Watters

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not offered every year.

ASTR 206
Astronomical Techniques with Laboratory

This course provides an introduction to modern methods of astronomical observation. Students will learn to use the Whitin Observatory's 0.7m research telescope. Topics include: planning observations, modern instrumentation, and the acquisition and quantitative analysis of astronomical images. This course requires substantial nighttime telescope use and culminates with an independent observing project.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: ASTR 107 or ASTR101 and ASTR102.

Instructor: McLeod

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ASTR 210
Cosmology: 13.7 Billion Years and Counting

The 21st century Universe is weirder than 20th century astronomers could imagine--its matter is mostly dark, its evolution is dominated by the effects of dark energy, and it is expanding at an accelerating rate. In this class, we will explore what we think we know about the makeup, history, and fate of our Universe. We will develop some of the basic laws of physics necessary to understand theoretical cosmology and apply them to the interpretation of modern cosmological observations.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ASTR 107 or 101, PHYS 107, and MATH 116; not open to students who have taken ASTR110/PHYS110.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ASTR 223/ GEOS 223
Planetary Atmospheres and Climates

Have you wondered what Earth's climate was like 3 billion years ago? What about weather patterns on Titan and climate change on Mars? In this course, we'll explore the structure and evolution of atmospheres and the climate on four worlds: the Earth, Mars, Venus, and Saturn's moon Titan. We'll examine the techniques and tools that geologists use to learn about the history of Earth's climate and that planetary scientists use to learn about the atmospheres and surface environments on other worlds. Students will also gain experience simulating the climate system and computing atmospheric properties. Other topics include: the super-rotation of Venus's atmosphere and its Runaway Greenhouse climate, the destruction of atmospheres on low-gravity worlds, and the future of Earth's climate as the Sun grows steadily brighter.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: GEOS 223

Prerequisites: MATH 116, PHYS 107 and one of ES 101, ASTR 107, GEOS 101, or GEOS 102, or by permission of instructor.

Instructor: Watters

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ASTR 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ASTR 250GH
Research or Group Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ASTR 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ASTR 303/ GEOS 313
Advanced Planetary Geology and Geophysics

Spacecraft observations have revealed a breathtaking diversity of geologic features in the solar system, such as the giant impact basins on Mars, towering thrust fault scarps on Mercury, coronae structures on Venus, and active volcanoes on Io and Enceladus.  From a comparative perspective, this course examines the physical processes that drive the evolution of the planets and small bodies in the solar system. Topics include: planetary shape and internal structure, mechanisms of topographic support, tectonics, impacts, volcanism, and tides.  Additional, out-of-class time is scheduled for seminar-style discussions of journal articles. Students also produce a final project that involves researching a topic of their choosing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: GEOS 313

Prerequisites: Any 100-level course in ASTR or GEOS in addition to at least one of the following - PHYS 107, GEOS 203, GEOS 218, or GEOS 220. An introductory course in mechanics (e.g., PHYS 104 or PHYS 107) is not required but is strongly recommended.

Instructor: Watters

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ASTR 304
Advanced Experimental Techniques

In this course students will learn advanced techniques for experimental astronomy and planetary science. Students will carry out term-long projects involving acquisition and analysis of data. In some cases these data will be derived from observations performed with telescopes or instruments built by the students themselves. In other cases students will build projects around data from space missions or ground or space-based telescopes. Techniques may include spectroscopy, photometry, multiwavelength astronomy, remote sensing of planetary surfaces, particle astrophysics, and gravitational wave astronomy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 8

Prerequisites: ASTR 202 or ASTR 206 or prior experience with instrumentation with permission of instructor.

Instructor: McLeod

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not offered every year.

ASTR 311/ PHYS 311
Advanced Astrophysics

Astrophysics is the application of physics to the study of the Universe. We will use elements of mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, special relativity, and nuclear physics to investigate selected topics such as planetary dynamics, the life stories of stars and galaxies, the interstellar medium, high-energy processes, and large scale structure in the Universe. Our goals will be to develop insight into the physical underpinnings of the natural world and to construct a "universal toolkit" of practical astrophysical techniques that can be applied to the entire celestial menagerie.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: PHYS 311

Prerequisites: PHYS 207

Instructor: French

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ASTR 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ASTR 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 5

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ASTR 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ASTR 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

BIOC 219/ BISC 219
Genetics with Laboratory

The goal of the course is to develop an understanding of the fundamental principles of genetics at the molecular, cellular, organismal and population levels. The course establishes a link between the generation of genetic variants through mutation and recombination, their patterns of inheritance, interactions between genes to produce complex phenotypes, and the maintenance of such genetic variation in natural populations. The course also explores principles of genome organization and the mechanisms that regulate gene expression. Other topics include: DNA sequencing and the use of genomic data to address questions in genetics, comparing and contrasting genetic regulation strategies across the three domains of life, and exploring experimental approaches for addressing genetic questions. Laboratory investigation will expose students to the fundamentals of genetics including transmission and molecular techniques for genetic analysis. Students must attend lab during the first week in order to continue in the course. Lab requires students to come in outside of scheduled lab time - generally 3 days after the scheduled lab. Please plan your schedule accordingly.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 60

Crosslisted Courses: BIOC 219

Prerequisites: BISC 110/BISC 112 or BISC 116/CHEM116. One unit of college chemistry is recommended. Not open to first-year students.

Instructor: Sequeira, Biller, Beers, Carmell, Okumura

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BIOC 220/ BISC 220
Cell Biology with Laboratory

Examines structure-function relationships in eukaryotic cells. We will explore the operation and regulation of molecular machines that carry out processes central to life. Considerable emphasis is placed on experimental approaches for investigating the following topics: protein structure and enzyme kinetics, biological membranes and transport, cytoskeletal assembly and function, protein biogenesis and trafficking, cell communication and signaling, the cell cycle, and intercellular interactions. Laboratory investigations will provide students with experience in classical and modern approaches to examine and quantify cellular processes. Students must attend lab during the first week in order to continue in the course.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 60

Crosslisted Courses: BIOC 220

Prerequisites: BISC 110/BISC 112 and two units of college chemistry or BISC 116/CHEM 116 and one unit of college chemistry. One semester of organic chemistry is recommended. Not open to first-year students. .

Instructor: Darling, Goss, Carmell, Roden

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BIOC 223/ CHEM 223
Fundamentals of Biochemistry with Laboratory

This course brings together the fundamental multidisciplinary concepts governing life at the molecular level and opens a gateway to advanced biochemistry offerings. Grounded in an understanding of aqueous equilibria, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic principles, the course will emphasize the structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. The laboratory introduces modern laboratory techniques for the study of biomolecules and develops experimental design and critical data analysis skills. The laboratory component can be of particular value to students planning or engaged in independent research and those considering graduate level work related to biochemistry. This course counts toward Chemistry or Biochemistry major requirements.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 9

Crosslisted Courses: BIOC 223

Prerequisites: CHEM 205 or CHEM 120, CHEM 211, and either BISC 110/BISC 112/BISC 116 or CHEM 212.

Instructor: Oakes, Staff

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

BIOC 227/ CHEM 227
Principles of Biochemistry

A survey of the chemical foundations of life processes, with focus on theory and applications relevant to medicine. Topics include bioenergetics, metabolism, and macromolecular structure. Essential skills such as data analysis and understanding of the primary literature will be approached through in-class discussions and application to current biomedical problems. This course is suitable for students wanting an overview of biochemistry, but it will not contain the experimental introduction to biochemical methods and laboratory instrumentation required for the Chemistry and Biochemistry majors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: BIOC 227

Prerequisites: CHEM 205 or CHEM 120, CHEM 211, CHEM 212, and BISC 110/BISC 112/BISC 116. CHEM 212 may be taken as corequisite with permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Does not count toward the minimum major in Chemistry. Not open to students who have completed CHEM/BIOC 223.

BIOC 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

BIOC 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall; Winter

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Winter; Spring

BIOC 320/ CHEM 320
Integrated Biophysical Chemistry Advanced Laboratory

An intensive laboratory course offering a multiweek independent team research project and training in experimental applications of physical chemistry and biochemistry. Topics will include spectroscopy and chemical thermodynamics of biomolecules. This course will emphasize independent hypothesis development and experimental design skills as well as professional conference-style presentation of results. Students will read primary literature, construct a research proposal, develop their own laboratory protocols manual, conduct experiments using a variety of instrumentation, and present their research in a poster format at the Ruhlman conference. One class period per week plus one lab and mandatory weekly meetings with instructor.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: BIOC 320

Prerequisites: BIOC 223/CHEM 223

Instructor: Oakes

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

BIOC 323/ CHEM 323
Advanced Seminar in Biochemistry

In-depth consideration of the functions of biomolecules and macromolecular assemblies. Topics will vary each semester, but will focus on one or more of the core concepts described by the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: bioenergetics; structure-function relationships; information storage and flow; scientific discovery and communication. The class will focus on shared reading, analysis, and discussion of research based on the primary biochemical literature. Throughout the semester, each student will develop an independent research proposal.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: BIOC 323

Prerequisites: BIOC/CHEM 223.

Instructor: Elmore

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BIOC 324/ CHEM 324
Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Advances in Chemical Biology

Many critical advances result from applying basic chemical principles and tools to biological systems. This approach has opened up exciting new areas of study, such as the biosynthesis of drug molecules and modern materials, the engineering of cells to incorporate “unnatural” biomolecules, and the development of improved methods to study processes in vivo. In this course, juniors and seniors will explore contemporary research breakthroughs in chemical biology through readings in the primary literature, invited lectures, interviewing researchers and developing independent research proposals. Students will analyze and interpret research findings through weekly writing assignments targeted towards broad audiences, such as research summaries for the scientific press, textbook sections, executive summaries and proposals accessible to non-specialists. Class sessions will be structured as workshops to analyze core chemical and biological concepts and provide structured critiques of writing assignments.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: BIOC 324

Prerequisites: CHEM 223/BIOC 223 or CHEM 227/BIOC 227 or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Elmore

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

BIOC 331/ CHEM 331
Physical Chemistry of Biological Systems: The Fundamental Models of Biological Molecules and Processes

This course will address fundamental questions about molecular structure, how chemical reactions take place, and why substances behave the way they do. Topics to be covered include: the laws of thermodynamics, physical transformations, chemical changes, chemical kinetics, quantum theory, atomic structure, the chemical bond, molecular interactions, molecular spectroscopy, and statistical thermodynamics. Applications to biologically relevant molecules will be discussed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 24

Crosslisted Courses: BIOC 331

Prerequisites: BIOC 223/CHEM 223 and MATH 116.

Instructor: Radhakrishnan

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Does not count toward the chemistry major but counts toward the biochemistry major and the chemistry minor.

BIOC 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

BIOC 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall; Winter

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Winter; Spring

BIOC 355
Biochemistry Thesis Research

The first course in a two-semester investigation of a significant research problem, culminating in the preparation of a thesis and defense of that thesis before a committee of faculty from the Biochemistry program. Students will discuss their research progress informally with faculty and student colleagues and gain familiarity with contemporary research through presentations by outside seminar speakers. This route does not lead to departmental honors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open only to seniors by permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

BIOC 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

BIOC 365
Biochemistry Thesis

The second course in a two-semester investigation of a significant research problem, culminating in the preparation of a thesis and defense of that thesis before a committee of faculty from the Biochemistry program. Students will discuss their research progress informally with faculty and student colleagues and gain familiarity with contemporary research through presentations by outside seminar speakers. This route does not lead to departmental honors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: BIOC 355 and by permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

BIOC 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: BIOC 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

BISC 104
Science or Science Fiction?

This course will examine the scientific facts behind phenomena portrayed in a variety of Hollywood and foreign movies. We will cover topics ranging from the definition and recreation of life, genetics and behavior to evolution and environmental issues. The course will include weekly screenings of movies outside of class time as well as lectures, assigned readings and discussions. While obtaining an introduction to key concepts in biology, students will also explore misconceptions about science and scientists that are perpetuated by these movies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Instructor: Königer

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Summer

Notes:

BISC 108
Environmental Horticulture

This course will examine how plants function, both as individual organisms and as critical members of ecological communities, with special emphasis on human uses of plants. Topics will include plant adaptations, reproduction, environmentally sound landscape practices, urban horticulture, and the use of medicinal plants. The hands-on component involves working with plants, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and field trips.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 28

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Instructor: Jones, Yang

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: BISC 108 is taught "studio-style" integrating the laboratory with lectures and other class activities.

BISC 109
Human Biology with Laboratory

This course focuses on human anatomy, physiology, and evolution. Lecture topics will include: human origins and evolution; the structure and function of the major physiological systems; exercise physiology; and human genetics. Laboratories explore human physiology, focusing on the development and application of skills in experimental design, statistical analysis, and scientific writing.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 28

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Instructor: Skow

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 110
Introductory Cellular and Molecular Biology with Laboratory

A gateway course that focuses on the study of life at the cellular and molecular level, including eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell structure, function of biological macromolecules, cellular metabolism, molecular genetics, and mechanisms of growth and differentiation. This course will provide the fundamental tools for exploration of this field with the aim of enhancing conceptual understanding. Laboratories focus on experimental approaches to these topics and are shared with BISC 112. Either BISC 110/BISC 112/BISC 116 or BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113 may be taken first. Students must attend lab during the first week in order to continue in the course.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 32

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken BISC 112 or BISC 116.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

BISC 111
Introductory Organismal Biology with Laboratory

A study of life, ranging from the physiology of organisms to the structure of ecosystems. The main themes of the course are evolution and biodiversity, form and function in plants and animals, and ecological interactions among organisms. The course provides the fundamental tools for exploration of organismal biology with the aim of enhancing conceptual understanding. Laboratories focus on experimental approaches to these topics and are shared with BISC 113. Either BISC 110/BISC 112/BISC 116 or BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113 may be taken first. Students must attend lab during the first week in order to continue in the course.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 32

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken BISC 111T/BISC 113.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

BISC 111T
Introductory Organismal Biology with Laboratory (Tropical Island)

Introduction to the central questions, concepts, and methods of experimental analysis in selected areas of organismal biology with a focus on tropical island biology. Topics include evolution, ecology, and plant and animal structure and physiology. Lectures and discussions during the Spring semester will prepare students for the field laboratory taught at the Central Caribbean Marine Institute in Little Cayman. Laboratory work will be carried out primarily in the field and includes introductions to the flora and fauna of the island and the coral reefs, as well as group projects. The nine-day field portion of the class will take place in mid-May.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken BISC 111/BISC 113. Contact instructor for the application in early October.

Instructor: Königer

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BISC 112
Exploration of Cellular and Molecular Biology with Laboratory

Seminar-style introduction to life at the cellular and molecular level, designed as an alternative to BISC 110 for students with strong high school preparation (such as AP, IB, or other). The course will include eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell structure, function of biological macromolecules, cellular metabolism, molecular genetics, and mechanisms of growth and differentiation, with an emphasis on experimental approaches to investigating these topics. This course will aim to develop students' skills in data analysis and scientific writing along with building foundational knowledge in the field. Lab sections are shared with BISC 110. This course differs from BISC 110 in its small class size and discussion-based format; it meets for one discussion and one lab session per week. Either BISC 110/BISC 112/BISC 116 or BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113 may be taken first. Students must attend lab during the first week in order to continue in the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: A score of 4 or 5 on the Biology AP exam or equivalent experience or permission of the instructor. Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken BISC 110 or BISC 116.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

BISC 112Y
First-Year Seminar: Exploration of Cellular and Molecular Biology with Laboratory

Seminar-style introduction to life at the cellular and molecular level, designed as an alternative to BISC 110 for students with strong high school preparation (such as AP, IB, or other). The course will include eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell structure, function of biological macromolecules, cellular metabolism, molecular genetics, and mechanisms of growth and differentiation, with an emphasis on experimental approaches to investigating these topics. This course will aim to develop students' skills in data analysis and scientific writing along with building foundational knowledge in the field. Lab sections are shared with BISC 110. This course differs from BISC 110 in its small class size and discussion-based format; it meets for one discussion and one lab session per week. Either BISC 110/BISC 112/BISC 116 or BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113 may be taken first. Students must attend lab during the first week in order to continue in the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: A score of 4 or 5 on the Biology AP exam or equivalent experience or permission of the instructor. Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken BISC 110 or BISC 116.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 113
Exploration of Organismal Biology with Laboratory

An exploration of the central questions, concepts, and methods of experimental analysis in selected areas of organismal biology, designed as an alternative to BISC 111 for students with strong high school preparation (such as AP, IB, or other). Topics include: the evolution and diversification of life, the form and function of plants and animals, and ecological interactions among organisms, with an emphasis on laboratory methods, data analysis, and science writing. Lab sections are shared with BISC 111. This course differs from BISC 111 in its smaller class size, a seminar-style format, and a focus on discussion of landmark scientific studies that shape this field; it meets for one discussion and one lab session per week. Either BISC 110/BISC 112/BISC 116 or BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113 may be taken first. Students must attend lab during the first week in order to continue in the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: A score of 4 or 5 on the Biology AP exam or equivalent experience or permission of the instructor. Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken BISC 111/BISC 111T.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course, Fall sections only.

BISC 113Y
First-Year Seminar: Exploration of Organismal Biology with Laboratory

An exploration of the central questions, concepts, and methods of experimental analysis in selected areas of organismal biology, designed as an alternative to BISC 111 for students with strong high school preparation (such as AP, IB, or other). Topics include: the evolution and diversification of life, the form and function of plants and animals, and ecological interactions among organisms, with an emphasis on laboratory methods, data analysis, and science writing. Lab sections are shared with BISC 111. This course differs from BISC 111 in its smaller class size, a seminar-style format, and a focus on discussion of landmark scientific studies that shape this field; it meets for one discussion and one lab session per week. Either BISC 110/BISC 112/BISC 116 or BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113 may be taken first. Students must attend lab during the first week in order to continue in the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: A score of 4 or 5 on the Biology AP exam or equivalent experience or permission of the instructor. Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken BISC 111/BISC 111T.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

BISC 116
Fundamentals of Chemistry and Molecular/Cellular Biology with Lab: An Integrated Approach

This gateway course provides an integrated introduction to the application of chemical principles to understand biological systems and covers the content of both BISC 110/112 and CHEM 105. It is designed for students whose interests lie at the interface of chemistry and biology and must be taken concurrently with CHEM 116. Students will learn how structure and function of biological systems are shaped by principles of atomic properties and chemical bonding. Cellular metabolism and molecular genetics are integrated with quantitative introductions to thermodynamics, equilibrium, and kinetics. Other topics motivated by the application of chemistry to biology include nuclear chemistry and cellular growth and differentiation. The laboratory is a hands-on introduction to spectroscopy, microscopy, and other experimental techniques, as well as quantitative analysis, experimental design, and scientific writing. Successful completion of this course enables a student to take any course for which either CHEM105 or BISC 110/112 is a prerequisite.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 32

Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry, math equivalent to two years of high school algebra, and fulfillment of the basic skills component of Quantitative Reasoning Requirement. Not open to students who have taken BISC 110 , BISC 112, CHEM 105, CHEM 105P, or CHEM 120. Students must attend lab during the first week to continue in the course.

Instructor: Matthews, Elmore (Chemistry), Hall (Chemistry)

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: CHEM 116-01 and BISC 116-01 are co-requisite courses and students must register for both sections at the same time. Students must also register simultaneously for a lab section (either BISC 116 L01 or BISC 116 L02). Students must attend the first lab session in order to continue in the course. Students with AP or IB credit in chemistry who elect this course forfeit the AP or IB credit.

BISC 198
Statistics in the Biosciences

This course combines statistical theory and practical application, the latter using examples from ecology and experimental biology to illustrate some of the more common techniques of experimental design and data analysis. Students will learn how to plan an experiment and consider the observations, measurements, and potential statistical tests before data are collected and analyzed. Other topics include graphical representation of data, probability distributions and their applications, one- and two-way ANOVA and t-tests, regression and correlation, goodness-of-fit tests, and nonparametric alternatives. Students also learn to use statistical computer software.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement and one course in biology, chemistry, or environmental science. Fulfills the Quantitative Reasoning overlay course requirement.

Instructor: Selden

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BISC 201
Ecology with Laboratory

An introduction to the scientific study of the interrelationships among organisms and their interactions with the environment. Topics include evolutionary adaptation in dynamic environments, behavioral ecology and life-history strategies, population growth and regulation, interactions among organisms, and the structure and function of biological communities and ecosystems. Emphasis is placed on the development of quantitative skills to address issues such as the stability and resilience of ecosystems with climate change, conservation of endangered species, and the dynamics of infectious disease. Laboratory sessions occur primarily in the field, where students explore and study local habitats, and will learn GIS, statistical analysis, and scientific writing.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 28

Prerequisites: BISC 108 or BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113 or ES 101 or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Koniger, Thomas

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 202
Evolution with Laboratory

Examination of evolution, the central paradigm of biology, at the level of populations, species, and lineages. Topics include the genetics of populations, the definition of species, the roles of natural selection and chance in evolution, the reconstruction of phylogeny, the evolution of sex, and the impact of sexual selection, the importance of evolutionary thinking in medicine, and patterns in the origination, diversity, and extinction of species over time. Labs include hands-on assessments of genetic variation in populations using DNA and protein based analyses; estimation of mutation rates in bacteria; exploration of computer simulations to understand the effects of genetic drift and student-designed experiments to assess the effects of natural selection in populations.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: BISC 110/BISC 112/BISC 116 and BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113.

Instructor: Sequeira, Dolce

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BISC 203
Comparative Physiology and Anatomy of Vertebrates with Laboratory

The physiology and functional anatomy of vertebrate animals, with an emphasis on comparisons among representative groups. The course covers topics in thermoregulatory, osmoregulatory, reproductive, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, neural, and ecological physiology. The laboratories incorporate the study of preserved materials and physiological experiments.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 36

Prerequisites: BISC 109 or BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Buchholtz, Dolce

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 204
Biological Modeling with Laboratory

Can we anticipate the effects that genetic variation will have on the future of a species? How can we predict the spread of an impending epidemic? How many fish will be in the ocean next year? Mathematical models liberate biologists from only being able to draw inferences from what we can directly observe, and these models allow us to develop a deeper understanding of complex systems. In this course students will develop skills in conceptualizing, writing, programming, and interpreting results from biological models through theoretical examples and laboratory exercises.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: BISC 110/BISC 112/BISC 116 or BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113, and MATH 116 (or equivalent), or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Matthes

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

BISC 207
The Biology of Plants with Laboratory

An introduction to experimental plant biology. Topics will include growth and development, physiology, plant defense, applications of genetic engineering to the study and improvement of plants, and the properties of medicinal plants. The project-oriented laboratory sessions will provide an introduction to some of the techniques currently employed in answering research questions ranging from the organismal to the cellular level.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: BISC 110/BISC 112/BISC 116 or BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113 and permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Peterman

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BISC 209
Microbiology with Laboratory

Introduction to bacteria, archaea, viruses, and eukaryotic microorganisms. Overview of the microbial world including a survey of the morphology, structure, function, and diversity of microorganisms and microbial effects on the environment. Introduction to the fundamental concepts of microbial evolution, genomics, metabolism, ecology, genetics, pathogenesis, and immunity. Investigation-based laboratories focused on microbial ecology, microbial interactions and molecular genetics will provide students with experience in classical and modern techniques. Students must attend lab during the first week in order to continue in the course.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 24

Prerequisites: BISC 110/BISC 112 and one unit of college chemistry or BISC 116/CHEM 116.

Instructor: Klepac-Ceraj, Roden

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 210
Marine Biology with Laboratory

Oceans cover more than 70 percent of the Earth's surface and are our planet's primary life support system. This course examines adaptations and interactions of plants and animals in a variety of marine habitats. Focal habitats include the photic zone of the open ocean, the deep-sea, subtidal and intertidal zones, estuaries, and coral reefs. Emphasis is placed on the dominant organisms, food webs, and experimental studies conducted within each habitat. Laboratories will emphasize fieldwork in marine habitats as well as hands-on study of marine organism adaptation and anatomy.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113 or ES 101, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Selden, Beers

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 214
Animal Behavior with Laboratory

In meeting the challenges of survival and reproduction, animals have evolved behaviors that can be spectacular and sometimes unpleasant. With an eye to how behaviors ultimately shape an animal's fitness, we will explore the aspects of life that make each animal's strategy unique, including communication, orientation, foraging, conflict and aggression, mating, parental care, and social life. Laboratories will expose students to the challenges of collecting, analyzing, interpreting, and presenting data on animal behavior.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 24

Prerequisites: BISC 109 or BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Ellerby, Skow

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BISC 216
Developmental Biology with Laboratory

In this course, we will explore animal development beginning with the process of fertilization. We will consider how a single cell gives rise to the many specialized cell types of the adult and how the development of tissues is coordinated. The mechanisms that determine cell fate during embryonic development will be discussed. Topics will include: embryonic induction, pattern formation, organ development, regeneration, stem cells, and aging. Laboratory sessions will focus on experimental approaches to development.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 36

Prerequisites: BISC 110/BISC 112/BISC 116 and BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Suzuki, Beers, Okumura

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BISC 247/ ES 247
Plant Diversity and Ecology with Laboratory

This course is a combination of “What's that wildflower?” and “Why does it grow over there and not here?” We begin by examining large-scale patterns of plant diversity from an evolutionary and phylogenetic perspective and then shift to an ecological perspective. Along the way, we zoom in to specific concepts and processes that help us understand overall patterns. Laboratories will primarily be taught in the field and greenhouses and will include plant identification, observational and experimental studies, and long-term study of forest communities on the Wellesley campus. Laboratories will also include aspects of experimental design and data analysis. The goal of the course is not only to train students in botany and plant ecology, but to engage them in the world of plants every time they step outside.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 14

Crosslisted Courses: BISC 247

Prerequisites: ES 100, ES 101, BISC 108, BISC 111, BISC 111T, BISC 113 or permission of instructor

Instructor: Griffith

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Not open to students who have completed ES 347/BISC 347.

BISC 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

BISC 250G
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

BISC 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

BISC 302
Human Physiology with Laboratory

This course takes an integrated approach to the study of organ system function in humans. We will examine control mechanisms that allow the body to maintain a constant balance in the face of environmental challenges, such as exercise, temperature change, and high altitude. Our particular focus will be recent findings in the areas of neural, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, and muscle physiology. In the laboratory, students gain experience with the tools of modern physiological research at both the cellular and organismal levels.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: BISC 111/BISC 111T/BISC 113 or NEUR 100, and either BISC 203 or NEUR 200.

Instructor: Ellerby, Dolce

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BISC 305
Seminar: Evolution

A brief history of life. Topics include the origin of life from nonlife, evolution of replicatory molecules, the early history of photosynthesis and eukaryotic structure, the diversification of domains, kingdoms and animal phyla, and the stepwise appearance of strategies for life in terrestrial and aerial environments. The course will emphasize student participation and make extensive use of the primary literature.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Two units in Biological Sciences at the 200 level or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Buchholtz

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BISC 306/ NEUR 306
Principles of Neural Development

This course will discuss aspects of nervous system development and how they relate to the development of the organism as a whole. Topics such as neural induction, neurogenesis, programmed cell death, axon guidance, synaptogenesis, and the development of behavior will be discussed, with an emphasis on the primary literature and critical reading and writing skills.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: BISC 30 6

Prerequisites: NEUR 200 or BISC 216, or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Beltz

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

BISC 307/ ES 307
Ecosystem Ecology with Laboratory

Ecosystems are essential to sustaining life on Earth. The emergent structure and function of ecosystems are regulated by feedbacks between biological and physical systems from the microscopic to the global scale. We will study how ecosystems cycle carbon and nutrients and how the energy balance of ecosystems creates critical feedbacks with climate. We will also examine the role that humans play in managing, creating, and using services from ecosystems in our current era of rapid global change. Students will develop statistical skills working with real datasets from the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) network and will gain experience collecting new field data to understand temporal and spatial patterns of ecosystem processes.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: ES 30 7

Prerequisites: Two units in Biological Sciences at the 200-level or above, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Matthes

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course

BISC 310
Seminar: Contemporary Issues in Marine Biology

Life in the sea faces accelerating threats due to ever-increasing demands and consequences of a growing human population. These include over-exploitation, pollution, habitat destruction, and invasive species. Overarching these are the many ramifications of global climate change. We will explore these issues through the primary literature, augmented with background material on marine biodiversity and ecology.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Two units in Biological Sciences at the 200 level, or permission of the instructor

Instructor: Selden

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BISC 311
Evolutionary Developmental Biology with Laboratory

The diversity of organismal forms has fascinated human beings for centuries. How did butterflies get eyespots? What is the evolutionary origin of bird feathers? How did snakes get to be so long? How did humans evolve? The field of evolutionary developmental biology, or evo-devo, integrates the long-separate fields of evolutionary biology and developmental biology to answer these questions. In this course, we will explore topics such as the evolution of novelties, body plan evolution, developmental constraints, convergent evolution, and the role of environmental changes in evolution. Through reading of original papers, we will examine recent advances made in evo-devo and critically analyze the role of evo-devo in biology and the implications beyond biology. Students will have the opportunity to design and conduct an independent research project using arthropods.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: BISC 201, BISC 202, BISC 216, or BISC 219, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Suzuki

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 314
Environmental Microbiology with Laboratory

The availability of next generation sequencing in the last 10-15 years has revolutionized the field of environmental microbiology. Although most of the microbial world remains to be discovered and explored, we are now starting to find answers to some central ecological questions such as: What microbes are present in various ecosystems? What is the distribution of each type of organism? What are their roles (functions)? How does each role relate to the magnitude of microbial activity? What factors influence microbial activity and interactions? We will explore the questions in the context of the human and cheese microbiomes. The topics will include microbial diversity, microbial evolution, phylogeny, physiology, metabolism, community ecology, genomics, metagenomics and proteomics. Through reading of original papers on the human microbiome, we will examine recent advances made in microbial ecology and critically analyze the role of microorganisms on human health and beyond. Students will have the opportunity to design and conduct an independent research project to explore the cheese microbiome.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: CHEM 211 plus any of the following - BISC 201, BISC 202, BISC 209, BISC 210, BISC 219, or BISC 220, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Klepac-Ceraj

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course

BISC 315/ NEUR 315
Neuroendocrinology with Laboratory

Hormones act throughout the body to coordinate basic biological functions such as development, differentiation, and reproduction. This course will investigate how hormones act in the brain to regulate physiology and behavior. We will study how the major neuroendocrine axes regulate a variety of functions, including brain development, reproductive physiology and behavior, homeostasis, and stress. The regulation of these functions by hormones will be investigated at the molecular, cellular, and behavioral levels. Laboratory experiments will explore various approaches to neuroendocrine research, including the detection of hormone receptors in the brain and analysis of behavior.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: BISC 315

Prerequisites: NEUR 200, or both BISC 110/BISC 112 and BISC 203, or both BISC 116/CHEM116 and BISC 203, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Tetel

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; EC - Epistemology and Cognition; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 316
Molecular Genetics with Laboratory

Molecular genetic techniques, which allow us to identify, analyze and manipulate genes, have revolutionized our understanding of how organisms develop and function. This course focuses on the use of molecular genetic and genomic approaches to dissect and manipulate complex biological systems. In this semester-long project-based course, students will use these approaches to pursue an original research question in a genetic model organism. Seminar-style class sessions will focus on critical analysis, presentation and discussion of the primary literature relevant to the research project. In the laboratory, students will gain experience with a variety of current molecular genetic methods (e.g. DNA cloning and sequencing, PCR, genomic analysis, RNAi, gene knock-outs, mutagenesis, bioinformatics) with an emphasis on experimental design and data analysis.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: BISC 219 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Peterman

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

BISC 318
Seminar: CRISPR Gene Editing – a new revolution in biology

CRISPR gene editing is at the center of an ongoing revolution in biology. This system for precise and efficient gene editing in living cells has led to numerous applications in medicine, agriculture and the environment. This course will examine the molecular genetic, cellular and biochemical principles that govern CRISPR and its myriad uses. Topics will include the microbial adaptive immune system and its modification for use as a gene editing tool, applications of CRISPR to the study and treatment of cancer, human genetic diseases and the improvement of food crops, CRISPR gene drives as tools to control disease-spreading insects and invasive species in wild populations, and CRISPR as a powerful tool to study model organisms and probe biological functions. We will also evaluate ethical and legal issues surrounding this revolutionary genome engineering system.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: BISC 219

Instructor: Peterman

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BISC 327/ ES 327
Seminar: Topics in Biodiversity

Topic for 2019-20: Biodiversity in the Built Environment:

How do other species interact with landscapes and habitats that people have modified or even completely restructured?  Which species live in human-dominated environments, and how does the diversity of species in these habitats affect the function and health of these ecosystems?  In this course we will build our scientific understanding of biodiversity and its consequences, and explore how this understanding can inform the design and management of spaces we occupy.  We will consider habitats from agricultural landscapes to suburban parks to buildings, with special attention to the opportunities afforded by Wellesley’s remarkable campus, including the Global Flora greenhouse.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: ES 327

Prerequisites: Two units in Biological Sciences at the 200 level or above, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Jones

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 328
Seminar: Modern Biological Imaging

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to examine how scientists address physiologically significant questions in cell and molecular biology using imaging-based techniques and modalities. We will examine the development and utilization of both qualitative and quantitative optical microscopy techniques, focusing on fluorescent microscopy. Student exploration and analysis of review and primary literature will be integral to this course along with a hands-on fluorescence microscopy project. Additional topics may include electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and biomedical imaging (MRI, CT, ultrasound, etc). The course incorporates a combination of introductory lectures, seminar-style discussions, practical experience, and student presentations throughout the semester.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: CHEM 211 and either BISC/BIOC 219 or 220 or permission of the instructor

Instructor: Darling

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 333
Genomics and Bioinformatics with Laboratory

Genomics, transcriptomics, and other ‘omics’ techniques represent powerful tools for studying biological systems. In this course, students will gain experience with the use of ‘next-generation’ DNA sequencing and other ‘omic approaches to address diverse types of questions in biology. Classroom lectures and discussions of primary literature will introduce students to key experimental and bioinformatics concepts underlying the design and interpretation of ‘omic studies. The laboratory will provide hands-on experience with a variety of computational tools for analyzing genomic and other large datasets, culminating in an original research project examining the genomics of marine microbial ecosystems. Topics to be covered include genome assembly and annotation, comparative genomics, metagenome interpretation, transcriptomics, metabolic pathway inference, phylogenetic analysis, and systems-level integration of multi-omics datasets.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: BISC 219/BIOC 219, BISC 209, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Biller

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BISC 334
Seminar: The Biology of Stem Cells

In this course, we will study stem cells in terms of molecular, cellular, and developmental biology. We will focus on different types of stem cells, particularly embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. More specifically, we will explore how stem cells develop, the criteria by which stem cells are defined, and stem cell characteristics under investigation. Current research in the areas of disease, potential stem cell therapies, and regenerative medicine will also be discussed. Bioethical issues related to stem cell biology will be described. Students will present and discuss original literature throughout the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: BISC 216 or BISC 219 or BISC 220.

Instructor: O'Donnell

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 335
Seminar: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Disease

This course will explore the underlying mechanisms of a variety of human diseases whose causes have been heavily studied at the cellular and molecular level. We will take a research-oriented approach to the material through critical reading and analysis of primary literature on each topic and we will explore how this knowledge informs the design, development and implementation of treatments. Topics of study may include diseases related to: metabolism, genetics, protein folding, cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, inflammation, and/or pathogenic infection. This course will utilize a combination of lectures to introduce general concepts, seminar-style discussions of primary literature articles, and student presentations throughout the semester.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: BISC 220

Instructor: Goss

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course

BISC 336
Seminar: Immunology

In this course, we will analyze the molecular, cellular, and biochemical mechanisms involved in the development and function of the immune system. We will also explore the immunological basis of infectious diseases (e.g. influenza and tuberculosis), allergic disorders, autoimmune diseases (e.g. multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis), immunodeficiency syndromes (e.g. AIDS), transplantation, and cancer. This course will utilize a combination of lectures to introduce new material, seminar-style discussions of primary research articles, and student presentations.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: BISC 219 or BISC 220.

Instructor: Matthews

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

BISC 338
Seminar. The Biology of Social Insects

Warfare, communication, agriculture, and caring for family are phenomena that are typically attributed to human societies, but social insects do these same things. In this course, we will explore the weird and wonderful world of social insects to discover their diverse strategies for success. We will learn about how conflict and selfishness have shaped the cooperative effort that characterizes these seemingly utopian communities. Topics will include the natural history of social insects, self organization in systems, models of division of labor, communication, and an examination of some of the biological oddities that have arisen as a result of kin selection. The format for the course will consist of demonstrations of basic principles, followed by discussion and presentation of classic literature and groundbreaking current research.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: BISC 201, BISC 202, or BISC 214 or by permission of instructor

Instructor: Mattila

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

BISC 340
Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Biology in the News

While scientists have made great progress understanding the intricate details of many biological processes, the scientific literacy of the general public has not kept pace with these exciting developments. The goal of this writing-intensive seminar is to synthesize knowledge from a wide range of biological disciplines and to learn how to communicate important biological concepts to a broad audience. Students will review articles from the primary literature, decide which findings are relevant, and work on making the information and the scientific process transparent, accessible, and interesting to non-experts. The goal of the work is to help people to make educated choices, e.g., about health and environmental issues, by writing short articles for media ranging from the newspaper to the website of an NGO.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Any two BISC 200-level courses; juniors and seniors only.

Instructor: Königer

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 347/ ES 347
Advanced Plant Diversity and Ecology with Laboratory

This course meets along with ES 247/BISC 247 and offers an opportunity for students to engage more deeply with the material and perform independent research. Students will be expected to more thoroughly review and reference peer-reviewed literature and assist in leading in-class discussions. Additionally, each student will develop and conduct an experiment (or observational study) over course of the semester that examines mechanisms of plant diversity and coexistence.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 14

Crosslisted Courses: BISC 347

Prerequisites: BISC 201, ES 220, BISC 207 or permission of instructor

Instructor: Griffith

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course is not available to students that have already taken ES 247/BISC 247.

BISC 348
Seminar: Muscle and Movement

Muscle driven movement is a defining feature of animal life. This course will explore the evolution, structure, and mechanical performance of muscle. Topics will include: the evolutionary origins of muscle; the molecular basis for force production; the excitation and control of muscle contraction; the role of muscle motors in animal movement; and changes in muscle performance associated with training, aging and disease. Emphasis will be placed on discussion of the primary literature, including foundational studies and recent research in the field.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Two units in the biological sciences at the 200 level or above, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Ellerby

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

BISC 350
Research or Individual Study

Independent research supervised by a member of the faculty of the Department of Biological Sciences or an off-campus director. Off-campus projects require an on-campus advisor from the department. Students will be expected to devote 10-12 hours per week to their research.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

BISC 350H
Research or Individual Study

Independent research supervised by a member of the faculty of the Department of Biological Sciences or an off-campus director. Off-campus projects require an on-campus advisor from the department. Students will be expected to devote 5-6 hours per week to their research.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

BISC 355
Biological Sciences Thesis Research

The first course in a two-semester investigation of a significant research problem, culminating in the preparation of a thesis and defense of that thesis before a committee of faculty from the Department of Biological Sciences. This route does not lead to departmental honors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open only to seniors by permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

BISC 360
Senior Thesis Research

Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester. This route can lead to departmental honors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

BISC 365
Biological Sciences Thesis

The second course in a two-semester investigation of a significant research problem, culminating in the preparation of a thesis and defense of that thesis before a committee of faculty from the Department of Biological Sciences. This route does not lead to departmental honors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: BISC 355 and by permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

BISC 370
Senior Thesis

Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester. This route can lead to departmental honors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: BISC 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

CAMS 101
Introduction to Cinema and Media Studies

CAMS 101 introduces students to the study of audio-visual media, including oral, print, photographic, cinematic, broadcast, and digital media forms and practices. Using a case study approach, we will explore the nature of audio-visual communication/representation in historical, cultural, disciplinary, and media-specific contexts, and examine different theoretical and critical perspectives on the role and power of media to influence our social values, political beliefs, identities, and behaviors. We'll also consider how consumers of media representations can and do contest and unsettle their embedded messages. Our emphasis will be on developing the research and analytical tools, modes of reading, and forms of critical practice that can help us to negotiate the increasingly mediated world in which we live.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None. Open to all students. CAMS 101 is required for all students majoring or minoring in Cinema and Media Studies, and should ideally be taken before any other CAMS course.

Instructor: Knouf

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CAMS 105Y
First-Year Seminar: Twenty-first-Century Cinema

An introduction to the cinematic experience, this course explores the excitement of recent global filmmaking with a special focus on independent and foreign art films to which students are unlikely to have been exposed so far (e.g. slow cinema). Through selected films and readings, the seminar examines the basic elements of filmic language including mise-en-scène, editing, cinematography, the relation of sound to image, and narrative structure. The major novelty of this seminar is its emphasis on the production of audiovisual essays. Students will learn the basics of videography, engaging with the material in a hands-on fashion. The kind of cinemas examined and the videography component make this seminar a must for adventurous minds interested in the multifaceted potential of audiovisual language.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None. Open to first-year students only.

Instructor: Viano

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

CAMS 106Y
First-Year Seminar: Ghostly Mediums: Specters and Hauntings in Media History and Technology

Specters haunt the nether-regions of media technology. Each new medium has offered potential avenues to hear the voices of the departed or contact otherworldly beings. In this course we will explore these possibilities through close attention to the ways in which media attempts to move beyond the earthly plane. These are extraordinary claims whose veracity is always under question but also tell us much about our own desires. We'll consider photography, phonography, magnetic tape, television, radio, and the internet, among other mediums. Students will also have the chance to test some of these claims through hands-on exercises and their own attempts to push the boundaries of media communication. No formal background in media history or production is required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Knouf

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 201
Technologies of Cinema and Media

This course investigates the technological, economic, and cultural determinants behind forms of media from the last 150 years, including the telephone, the telegraph, photography, and film, as well as new media like virtual reality and interactive media. If photography realized the desire to transcend mortality and early cinema fulfilled the dream to depict the world, their missions have been extended by technologies that seek to invent new worlds as well as material and virtual realities. Relying on a material theory of film and audio-visual media, the course examines both technologies of making and of circulation, exploring the commercial potential of the entertainment industry. The course will employ relevant texts, films, and other audio-visual artifacts.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CAMS 101 or CAMS 105 or CAMS 106 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Morari, Knouf

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 202
Aesthetics of Cinema and Media

Examining cinematic forms and styles, this course retraces film's emergence and development as an art and its relations to other artistic, cultural, technological, and socio-economic practices. Analysis of representative films will help understand cinema's relationship to reality, including its reproduction and construction of the "real," the changing terms of spectatorship, and the ways in which film aesthetics have been employed to build ideology and interrogate it. Understanding form as inextricably bound to content, we will appreciate the aesthetic significance of formal choices and innovations within particular films, directorial oeuvres, periods and movements, from classical Hollywood cinema to European New Waves of the 60s and 70s, to the contemporary cinemas of Asia and Latin America.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CAMS-101 or CAMS-105 or CAMS-106 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Morari, Knouf

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CAMS 208/ ENG 208
Writing for Television

A workshop course on writing the television script, including original pilots and episodes of existing shows. We’ll study both one-hour dramas and half-hour comedies, and practice the basics of script format, visual description, episode structure, and character and story development. Students will complete a final portfolio of 30-50 minutes (pages) of teleplay.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 20 8

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Holmes

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CAMS 213/ GER 288
From Berlin and London to Hollywood (in English)

This course offers an introduction to the formative years of Hollywood by tracing the impact of European cinema on the American movie industry. Focusing on the work of film directors who in the first half of the twentieth century left the European centers of film-making for Hollywood, we will discuss the commercial competition between Berlin, London, and Hollywood as well as notions of aesthetic transfer. Among the actors and directors to be discussed are Marlene Dietrich, Alfred Hitchcock, F.W. Murnau, Fritz Lang, Ernst Lubisch, Billy Wilder, Douglas Sirk, Charlie Chaplin and others.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 213

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

CAMS 216/ MAS 216
Creative Media Manipulation

The arts and humanities are infused with media, from the printed word to digital images, videos, and sound. Knowing how these media are constructed at a fundamental material level means that one can be an active producer of digital artifacts, rather than a passive consumer who cedes creative control to someone else. In this course students will learn programming skills that allow them to create and manipulate images, text, video, sound, and the physical world. Programming languages and environments may include Processing, Python, Arduino, and Lilypad. Lectures, assignments, and programming experiments will ensure that all students understand the material regardless of experience or background. We will regularly illustrate the intersection of the arts and humanities with computation and digital technologies through the reading of historical texts and the close examination of specific works. Skills learned in the course will be useful for future work in the digital humanities among other domains.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: MAS 216

Prerequisites: CAMS 101, MAS 115, or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Knouf

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 218
Theories of Media From Photography to the Internet

Considering media as diverse as photography, film, radio, television, video, sound recording, and the Internet, this course is an introduction to the major theoretical works of media theory through a close attention to both texts and media artifacts. Topics include theories of ideology, spectatorship and reception, structuralism and poststructuralism, modernism and postmodernism, semiotics, psychoanalysis, postcolonialism, feminism, and queer theory. Through class discussions and writing assignments, students will consider both prevailing conceptual currents as well as alternative formulations in order to question the various forces that work to shape media as material and discursive systems. Readings will be structured so that media works are paired with historical and contemporary texts in order to draw out the connections between the theory, history, and practice of media.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: CAMS 101

Instructor: Morari

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Required for all students majoring or minoring in Cinema and Media Studies.

CAMS 222
"Being There": Documentary Film and Media

This course surveys the history, theory, and practice of documentary film, considering the ways its forms and ethics have changed since the beginning of cinema. We study the major modes of the documentary, including cinema verité, direct cinema, investigative documentary, ethnographic film, agit-prop and activist media, and the personal essay, as well as recent forms such as the docudrama, the archival film, “mockumentary,” and Web-based forms. We will examine the “reality effects” of these works, focusing on the ways in which they create their authority. We will ask: How do these films shape notions of truth, reality, and point of view? What are the ethics and politics of representation and who speaks for whom when we watch a documentary? What do documentaries make visible or conceal?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: CAMS 101 or ARTH 101 or permission of the instructor. CAMS core course. Meets core requirement for CAMS major and minor.

Instructor: TBD

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 225
Cinema in the Public Sphere: From the Fairground to Netflix

How did cinema, originally hailed as a popular entertainment, achieve the social legitimacy that elevated it to the rank of an art form and an industrial force? This course examines the development of cinema as an institution over the last 150 years, from its origins to its present digital extensions, from Europe to Latin America, from Japan to the United States. Relying on academic scholarship, film criticism, and a selection of documentaries and essay-films, we will examine the historical, social and aesthetic conditions that led to the creation of the movie theater, the opening of cine-clubs, art houses, and multiplexes, as well as cinema's relationship to television and the exponentialized accessibility of films in the age of video and streaming.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CAMS 101, CAMS 105 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Morari

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 229
Transnational Journeys in European Women’s Filmmaking

The purpose of this course is to examine award winning films directed by European women, from activist documentaries to experimental and mainstream features. These artists set their narratives in a milieu of national contexts, diasporic identities, and post-national transformations. They also weave together private spheres and public events, revisit historical wounds, explore contemporary realities and assemble these elements as the tiles of a socio-cultural mosaic. Examined through feminist theory, the films selected for this course explore the poetics of presence and (in)visibility. This course also aims to develop a transnational comparative film analysis.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Laviosa

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

CAMS 234/ ENG 204
The Art of Screenwriting

A creative writing course in a workshop setting for those interested in the theory and practice of writing for film. This course focuses on the full-length feature film, both original screenplays and screen adaptations of literary work. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 234

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Cezair-Thompson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit. Students who have taken this course once may register for it one additional time.

CAMS 240/ WGST 223
Gendering the Bronze Screen: Representations of Chicanas/Latinas in Film

The history of Chicanxs and Latinxs on the big screen is a long and complicated one. To understand the changes that have occurred in the representation of Chicanxs/Latinxs, this course proposes an analysis of films that traces various stereotypes to examine how those images have been perpetuated, altered, and ultimately resisted. From the Anglicizing of names to the erasure of racial backgrounds, the ways in which Chicanxs and Latinxs are represented has been contingent on ideologies of race, gender, class, and sexuality. We will be examining how films have typecast Chicanas/Latinas as criminals or as "exotic" based on their status as women of color, and how Chicano/Latino filmmakers continue the practice of casting Chicanas/Latinas solely as supporting characters to male protagonists.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 240

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Mata

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 241/ WGST 249
Asian American Women in Film

This course will serve as an introduction to representations of Asian/American women in film beginning with silent classics and ending with contemporary social media. In the first half of the course, we examine the legacy of Orientalism, the politics of interracial romance, the phenomenon of "yellow face", and the different constructions of Asian American femininity, masculinity, and sexuality. In the second half of the course, we look at "Asian American cinema" where our focus will be on contemporary works, drawing upon critical materials from film theory, feminist studies, Asian American studies, history, and cultural studies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 241

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Creef

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CAMS 243/ SAS 243
Love in Indian Cinema

This course explores the treatment of various types of love-for the beloved, the family, the community, the motherland or the divine-in Indian cinema, the largest and one of the oldest film industries in the world. Beginning with Indian cinema's early phase in the colonial milieu, the course continues with an examination of its flourishing in popular and art films in the later part of the twentieth century and films made by diaspora Indians. We will watch films by prominent directors like Bimal Roy, Guru Dutt, Raj Kapoor, Mani Ratnam, and Meera Nayar that have “love” as a core theme. With particular attention to the distinctive grammar of song, dance and intense drama, we will consider how Indian cinema offers a mirror to the society and culture of India, reworking its long conventions of narratives and performance in a medium imported from Europe.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 243

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Shukla-Bhatt

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and director of Cinema and Media Studies required.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CAMS 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor and director of Cinema and Media Studies required.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

CAMS 272
The Ludic Imagination: Histories and Theories of Games and Play

Videos games have become a major cultural force, with budgets for new titles rivaling those of feature films. Yet video games are oft maligned as time wasters or contributors to deviant behavior. This course takes a different stance, and shows that games are not simply frivolous activities, but rather are emblems of societal desires. Introducing the burgeoning field of "game studies", we will examine not only contemporary video games but also their connection to earlier forms of games and play. Topics will include the relationships between industry and indie games; forms of representation in video games; artistic uses of games for cultural critique; the connections between video games and other forms of screen-based media; and the ways in which new forms of play merge the physical and the digital worlds. Important to our investigation will be hands-on encounters with new and old games in order to highlight the connections between the theories we study and the embodied experience of play.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: CAMS 101, CAMS 135/ARTS 165, or ARTH 100 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 276
Media Publics: An Introduction to Civic Media

This course will examine how media (such as print, the telephone, radio, film, television, video, mobile phones, and the Internet, among others) intersect with civil society. We will explore how these media function in the development of publics and counterpublics, and how communities repurpose these media for their own ends. While we regularly hear how some new form of social media is going to "revolutionize'' public participation by fostering the development of new communities and toppling repressive regimes, we will take a more skeptical stance, examining how "new'' media have always been imbued with revolutionary potential, but also how they often fall prey to entrenched commercial interests. Nevertheless, we will examine cases where bottom-up development of new forms of participation and engagement with media have enabled otherwise marginalized voices to be expressed. Students will have the opportunity to create their own civic media projects for the public(s) of their choice.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: CAMS 101, or permission of instructor

Instructor: Knouf

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

CAMS 286/ GER 286
Fantasy Factories: Film and Propaganda in Nazi Germany and Beyond (in English)

This course examines the cinematic output of Nazi Germany as a test case for the development of film as propaganda. We consider the cinematic medium as entertainment and as a cultural event with the potential to influence a population. We trace the forebears of Nazi film, including WWI propaganda produced in Britain, France and Germany and Soviet films made to serve the revolutionary agenda. We examine the ways in which Goebbels' Ministry of Propaganda deployed both overtly propagandist films and films that couched Nazi ideals in narratives from melodrama to fantasy, and examine whether films could exceed their official aims and become subversive. And we consider post-WWII developments: the continuing careers of producers of propaganda and the ways that modern media shapes new forms of propaganda.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 286

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Hans

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 292/ ENG 292
Film Noir

A journey through the dark side of the American cinematic imagination. Emerging during World War II and its aftermath, Film Noir presents a pessimistic, morally ambiguous inversion of Hollywood uplift, delivered in glamorous visual style. This course will explore Film Noir from its origins, through the revival of the genre in the early 1970s, to its ongoing influence in contemporary cinema. We'll pay particular attention to noir's redefinition of American cinematic style, and to its representations of masculinity and femininity. Films that may be studied include Howard Hawks's The Big Sleep, Billy Wilder's Double Indemnity, Robert Altman's The Long Goodbye, Roman Polanski's Chinatown, and David Lynch's Mulholland Drive.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 292

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 300/ FREN 300
Post-Apocalyptic Cinema: French Visions of Ecological Trauma (in French)

How has French cinema responded to the reality of environmental crisis and the specter of ecological catastrophe? Issues linked to political ecologies and environmental ethics, anthropocentrism, climate change, pollution and technological challenges have influenced the shape and substance of these cinematic responses. Work in the film medium has assumed a critical place in a forum otherwise dominated by specialists in sciences, economics and engineering. Indeed, French cinema has articulated a French voice in response to this global problem. As we probe environmental discourses and their cinematic figuration, we will read, among others, texts by Marc Augé, Luce Irigaray or Bruno Latour, and discuss representative films by directors such as Georges Méliès, René Clair, Agnès Varda, Chris Marker, Jean-Luc Godard, Claire Denis or Jacques Tati. This course is taught in French.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CAMS 300

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Morari

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: In French.

CAMS 320
Seminar: Sonic Modulations: Investigating Sound as a Medium

Sound is a physical force that modulates both air and our emotions simultaneously. Sound can align our bodies to the rhythm of music or knock us down via an acoustic weapon. Despite this power, the sonic has often been subsumed by the visual in humanistic discourse. Recent decades have nevertheless expanded the purview of media studies into the domain of “sound studies”. This course will explore the foundational ideas, texts, and materials in this nascent field. We will explore how sound shapes (and is shaped by) space and time, how it is culturally coded, how it works to distribute both information and feelings, and how listening is an active force. Students will also engage with material experiments in sound that weave sound studies theory, history, and practice together.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: CAMS 202 or CAMS 218 or instructor permission.

Instructor: Knouf

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 324
Film Genre, Genre Films

We constantly describe films with labels like action, horror, rom-com, sci-fi, musical, western, but where do those categories come from, and how do we decide what belongs within them? This course will explore the concept of film genre in terms both theoretical and practical. We’ll examine the antecedents of cinema’s genre system in literary criticism, read key works of film genre theory, and watch films in a wide range of genres. Among the questions we’ll address are: How do ideas about genre help us understand the cinematic experience? How do genre categories influence the production and marketing of films, and the discourse around them? How do ideas about genre connect to social identities, such as race and gender, to create categories like “chick flick” or “Blaxploitation”? What criteria differentiate the genres we value from those we don’t?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Either CAMS 201 or CAMS 202, and an additional 200-level CAMS course.

Instructor: Vernon Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CAMS 327
Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Public Writing on Film and TV

This course will explore a wide range of writing on current film and television, thinking about the forms of contemporary discourse on the moving image and ways our own writing can join the conversation. We will read and write reviews, trend pieces, and star studies, bringing our specialized knowledge as moving image enthusiasts to bear on pieces intended to speak to and engage a broad reading public. Students will develop and present their writing in workshop discussions, and serve as editors to their peers. Readings from classic and contemporary writers on film and television will help us refine our sense of what makes writing on media illuminating, accessible, and compelling.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: CAMS 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Shetley

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CAMS 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

CAMS 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

CAMS 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the director.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CAMS 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: CAMS 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CHEM 103
Elements and the Environment

Elements and molecules interact with the environment producing global challenges such as climate change, ozone depletion, and heavy metal pollution. This course is a general introduction to the chemistry of such environmental problems, focusing on the chemical principles that regulate the effect, fate, and transport of chemicals in the environment. It explores how the structure of a chemical relates to its environmental impact and how interactions can be predicted through chemistry. Assignments will include working with real data-sets of elements in the environment, such as records of phosphorus in Alaska, carbon in forests, oxygen in the ocean, and heavy metals in soils.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 24

Prerequisites: Students need to have completed the QR basic skills requirement.

Instructor: Stanley

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHEM 104Y
FirstYear Seminar. How to Model: Building, Using, and Evaluating Models Across the Disciplines

Every person -- from an artist or linguist to an economist or scientist -- relies on models to make sense of her world, herself, and the relationships between the two. In this first-year seminar, we will explore what models are, how they are created, and how they are paradoxically useful due to their imperfections. Through primary literature and discussions, we will discuss the philosophical and psychological bases of model creation and limitation. We will also explore, apply, evaluate, and even create both qualitative and mathematical models across the disciplines aided by primary literature, hands-on activities, and guest speakers and faculty who engage with models within their fields, ranging from art to physical science. In this way, the course will serve as a "sampler" to introduce students to many academic disciplines while also preparing students to recognize both the power and limitations of models in their future learning.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Mala Radhakrishnan

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHEM 105
Fundamentals of Chemistry with Laboratory

This course is designed for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences as well as those wishing an introduction to modern molecular science. Core principles and applications of chemistry are combined to provide students with a conceptual understanding of chemistry that will help them in both their professional and everyday lives. Topics include principles of nuclear chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, molecular energetics, chemical equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The laboratory work introduces students to synthesis and structural determination by infrared and other spectroscopic techniques, periodic properties, computational chemistry, statistical analysis, and various quantitative methods of analysis. This course is intended for students who have taken one year of high school chemistry and have a math background equivalent to two years of high school algebra. Students who have AP or IB credit in chemistry, and who elect CHEM 105, forfeit the AP or IB credit.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 28

Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry. Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken CHEM 105P, CHEM 116, or CHEM 120.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CHEM 105P
Fundamentals of Chemistry with Laboratory

This course is designed for students majoring in the physical and biological sciences as well as those wishing an introduction to modern molecular science. Core principles and applications of chemistry are combined to provide students with a conceptual understanding of chemistry that will help them in both their professional and everyday lives. Topics include principles of nuclear chemistry, atomic and molecular structure, molecular energetics, chemical equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The laboratory work introduces students to synthesis and structural determination by infrared and other spectroscopic techniques, periodic properties, computational chemistry, statistical analysis, and various quantitative methods of analysis. This course is intended for students who do not meet the prerequisites for CHEM 105 and for students who, because of their previous chemistry and math experiences, require additional academic support for the study of introductory chemistry. Includes two additional class meetings each week. Students in CHEM 105P must enroll in CHEM 105P lab.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Open by permission of the instructor to students regardless of high school background or QR basic skills completion. Not open to students who have taken CHEM 105, CHEM 116, or CHEM 120.

Instructor: Miwa

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHEM 116
Fundamentals of Chemistry and Molecular/Cellular Biology with Lab: An Integrated Approach

This gateway course provides an integrated introduction to the application of chemical principles to understand biological systems and covers the content of both BISC 110/112 and CHEM 105. It is designed for students whose interests lie at the interface of chemistry and biology and must be taken concurrently with BISC 116. Students will learn how structure and function of biological systems are shaped by principles of atomic properties and chemical bonding. Cellular metabolism and molecular genetics are integrated with quantitative introductions to thermodynamics, equilibrium, and kinetics. Other topics motivated by the application of chemistry to biology include nuclear chemistry and cellular growth and differentiation. The laboratory is a hands-on introduction to spectroscopy, microscopy, and other experimental techniques, as well as quantitative analysis, experimental design, and scientific writing. Successful completion of this course enables a student to take any course for which either CHEM105 or BISC110/112 is a prerequisite.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 32

Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry, math equivalent to two years of high school algebra, and fulfillment of the basic skills component of Quantitative Reasoning Requirement. Not open to students who have taken BISC 110, BISC 112, CHEM 105, CHEM 105P, or CHEM 120. Students must attend lab during the first week to continue in the course.

Instructor: Matthews, Elmore (Chemistry), Hall (Chemistry)

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: CHEM 116-01 and BISC 116-01 are co-requisite courses and students must register for both sections at the same time. Students must also register simultaneously for a lab section (either BISC 116 L01 or BISC 116 L02). Students must attend the first lab session in order to continue in the course. Students with AP or IB credit in chemistry who elect this course forfeit the AP or IB credit.

CHEM 120
Intensive Introductory Chemistry with Laboratory

A one-semester course for students who have completed more than one year of high school chemistry, replacing CHEM 105 and CHEM 205 as a prerequisite for more advanced chemistry courses. It presents the topics of nuclear chemistry, atomic structure and bonding, periodicity, kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, equilibrium, acid/base chemistry, solubility, and transition metal chemistry. All of these topics are presented in the context of both historical and contemporary applications. The laboratory includes experiments directly related to topics covered in lecture, an introduction of statistical analysis of data, molecular modeling and computational chemistry, instrumental and classical methods of analysis, thermochemistry, and solution equilibria. The course meets for four periods of lecture/discussion and one 3.5-hour laboratory.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 32

Prerequisites: Open to students who have a score of 4 or 5 on the Chemistry AP exam or an IB Chemistry higher level score of 5 or above. Students must have fulfilled the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have completed CHEM 105/CHEM 105P/CHEM 116 and/or CHEM 205.

Instructor: Arumainayagam

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHEM 205
Chemical Analysis and Equilibrium with Laboratory

This course builds on the principles introduced in CHEM 105, with an emphasis on chemical equilibrium and analysis, and their role in the chemistry of the environment. Topics include chemical reactions in aqueous solution with particular emphasis on acids and bases; solubility and complexation; electrochemistry; modeling of complex equilibrium and kinetic systems; statistical analysis of data; and solid state chemistry of ceramics, zeolites and new novel materials. The laboratory work includes additional experience with instrumental and noninstrumental methods of analysis, sampling, and solution equilibria.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 36

Prerequisites: CHEM 105 or CHEM 105P or CHEM 116 and fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken CHEM 120.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

CHEM 211
Organic Chemistry I with Laboratory

Topics covered include: stereochemistry, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides, alcohols and ethers, nomenclature of organic functional groups, IR, and GC/MS.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 28

Prerequisites: CHEM 105, CHEM 105P, CHEM 116, or CHEM 120.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CHEM 212
Organic Chemistry II with Laboratory

A continuation of CHEM 211. Includes NMR spectroscopy, synthesis, reactions of aromatic and carbonyl compounds, amines, and carbohydrates. In addition, students are expected to study the chemical literature and write a short chemistry review paper.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 42

Prerequisites: CHEM 211

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

CHEM 250
Research or Individual Study

Research is supervised by a member of the Wellesley College chemistry department. Off-campus research requires active participation of a Wellesley faculty member throughout the research period. Course fulfills the research requirement for the major only upon completion of a paper of 8-10 pages on the research and a presentation to the chemistry department during one of the two research seminar presentation periods. A copy of the paper must be submitted to the chair of the department.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open by permission to students who have taken at least one chemistry course and are not eligible for CHEM 350.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CHEM 250H
Research or Individual Study

Research is supervised by a member of the Wellesley College Chemistry Department. Students will be expected to devote 10-12 hours per week for CHEM 250 and five to six hours for CHEM 250H.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open by permission to students who have taken at least one chemistry course and are not eligible for CHEM 350 or 350H.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

CHEM 302/ EDUC 317
Seminar: Communicating and Teaching Chemistry

Making scientific discoveries is clearly important, but it is also vital to be able to communicate science effectively to non-expert audiences. How do people learn? And in particular, how do inquiry-based learning techniques improve the learning experience? This course provides students the opportunities to explore and apply current research on learning and instructional strategies by developing a series of hands-on in-class chemistry activities. Students will read primary literature on pedagogical approaches from a range of sources, including chemical education journals. Students will synthesize and apply numerous chemical concepts that they have learned in-depth in previous chemistry classes in order to design and teach a chemistry lesson at a local elementary school. Additionally, students will communicate and teach chemistry to non-expert audiences at a museum or science cafe. This class will be useful to students considering careers in the medical profession, so that they can clearly explain science to their patients; careers in research science, so they can inform the public of their discoveries; and careers in education, so they can teach science in an exciting and meaningful fashion.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 317

Prerequisites: Chem 205 or Chem 120.

Instructor: Rachel Stanley

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHEM 307
Nanoscience

“Why cannot we write the entire 24 volumes of the Encyclopedia Brittannica on the head of a pin?” When the physicist Richard Feynman first asked that question a half century ago, the word nanoscience had yet to be used. Today, nanoscience and nanotechnology have created a great deal of interest from scientists and engineers and also from the general public. Questions we will address include: What is the nature of nanoscience and nanotechnology? What are the principles that enable us to predict behavior over nanometer length scales? How are nanomaterials made and organized? How is nanotechnology likely to impact our lives? We will use the primary literature, popular portrayals, and interactions with researchers in nanoscience as avenues to explore the field.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHEM 205 or CHEM 120, and CHEM 211.

Instructor: Flynn

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHEM 308
Seminar:The Organic Chemistry of Drug Design and Discovery

This course will cover a variety of aspects about drugs: discovery, development, mechanism of action, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, toxicity, clinical trials, and legal aspects. Utilizing clinically important drugs as examples, chemistry principles will be reviewed and applied to understand the concepts of medicine at a molecular level. Such understanding can be the foundation for the further drug discovery and elucidation of the mechanism of drug action. One of the objectives of this course is to provide students with the ability to integrate concepts from chemistry and medicine in an interdisciplinary way. This course will prepare the students for future study or career in fields such as chemistry, medicine, law, and business management.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 24

Prerequisites: One semester organic chemistry course or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Adrian Huang

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Notes:

CHEM 309
Computational Chemistry

Computational chemistry now plays a crucial role in both the design and the analysis of molecules and systems across industries including pharmaceuticals, materials, and manufacturing. This course will provide students with a conceptual understanding of computational modeling techniques pertinent to chemistry along with practical experience applying these methods. Specific techniques considered in the course may include quantum mechanical ab initio and semiempirical models, molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics simulations, optimization and sampling frameworks, and chemical informatics, with case studies coming from current literature. Emphasis will be placed on the trade-offs between model accuracy and efficiency, and fundamental principles in computer programming, numerical methods, hardware, and software will be introduced as they relate to this trade-off. Application of these methods to solve problems in diverse areas, such as protein structure, drug design, organic reactivity, and inorganic systems, will also be emphasized. In addition to regular computer-based exercises, the course will culminate in an independent project utilizing techniques presented in the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: CHEM 205 or CHEM 120 and CHEM 211 and MATH 116, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Radhakrishnan

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall; Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHEM 310
Seminar: Chemistry of the Heavens

The course will cover the foundations of astrochemistry, a young field at the intersection between chemistry and astronomy. Topics to be discussed include the interstellar medium, atomic and molecular physics, interstellar chemistry, molecular astronomy, and unresolved enigmas in the field, such as the homochirality of amino acids. The seminar will involve guest lectures by experts, group discussions, readings from the primary and review literature, field trip(s), movies (including a science fiction movie), weekly writing assignments, telescopic observations, and one day in a laboratory on earth.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 24

Prerequisites: CHEM 105/ CHEM 120.

Instructor: Chris Arumainayagam

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Every three years

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHEM 318
Advanced Organic Chemistry: Reactions, Mechanisms, and Modern Synthetic Methods

This course will cover strategies and tactics for assembling complex organic molecules. Considerable emphasis will be placed on stereoselective synthesis, including the stereoselective construction of ring systems, acyclic stereocontrol, and asymmetric catalysis. Reaction mechanisms will also be emphasized throughout the semester. Lecture topics will be accompanied by case studies drawn from the current chemical literature. The course will culminate in an independent project involving pharmaceuticals and other molecules of medicinal importance.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: CHEM 212

Instructor: Carrico-Moniz

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHEM 330
Physical Chemistry I with Laboratory

Molecular basis of chemistry; intensive overview of theories, models, and techniques of physical chemistry; extensive coverage of quantum mechanics; applications of quantum mechanics to atomic and molecular structure, and spectroscopy; classical thermodynamics of gases and solutions; intermediate topics in chemical kinetics and introduction to reaction dynamics; basic statistical mechanics to calculate thermodynamic variables and equilibrium constants.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CHEM 205 or CHEM 120, PHYS 104 or PHYS 107, MATH 215 (strongly recommended) or MATH 205. Not open to students who have taken CHEM 331.

Instructor: Arumainayagam

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHEM 330X
Introduction to Physical Chemistry

Molecular basis of chemistry; intensive overview of theories, models, and techniques of physical chemistry; extensive coverage of quantum mechanics; applications of quantum mechanics to atomic and molecular structure, and spectroscopy; classical thermodynamics of gases and solutions; intermediate topics in chemical kinetics and introduction to reaction dynamics; basic statistical mechanics to calculate thermodynamic variables and equilibrium constants.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: Chem 205 or 120, PHYS 104 or PHYS 107, MATH 215 (strongly recommended) or MATH 205. Not open to students who have taken CHEM 331.

Instructor: Arumainayagam

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHEM 334
Physical Chemistry II

This course provides an in-depth study of the physical models used in the study of chemical systems, including both first-principle derivations and cutting-edge applications of such models. Topics include statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, computational chemistry, molecular mechanics and dynamics, philosophical foundations of quantum mechanics, time-dependent quantum mechanics, and kinetics.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHEM 330, (CHEM 331 by permission of the instructor), PHYS 106 or PHYS 108; and MATH 215. Not open to students who have taken CHEM 335.

Instructor: Radhakrishnan

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHEM 335
Physical Chemistry II with Laboratory

This course provides an in-depth study of the physical models used in the study of chemical systems, including both first-principle derivations and cutting-edge applications of such models. Topics include statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, computational chemistry, molecular mechanics and dynamics, philosophical foundations of quantum mechanics, time-dependent quantum mechanics, and kinetics. Additionally, there is an emphasis on implementing statistical and numerical models using the Matlab programming environment, culminating in an independent project.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: CHEM 330, (CHEM 331 by permission of the instructor), PHYS 106 or PHYS 108; and MATH 215. Not open to students who have taken CHEM 334.

Instructor: Radhakrishnan

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not offered in 2019-2020.

CHEM 341
Inorganic Chemistry with Laboratory

Atomic structure, multi-electron atoms, the periodic table and periodicity, chemical applications of group theory, molecular orbital theory, the chemistry of ionic compounds, generalized acid/base theories, transition metal complexes, organometallic chemistry, catalysis, and bioinorganic chemistry. The laboratory introduces a number of experimental and computational techniques used in inorganic chemistry.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 24

Prerequisites: Required CHEM 205 or CHEM 120, and CHEM 211; Strongly recommended CHEM 212.

Instructor: Stanley

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHEM 350
Research or Individual Study

Research is supervised by a member of the Wellesley College chemistry department. Students will be expected devote (per week) 10-12 hours for CHEM 350 and five to six hours for CHEM 350H. Student projects will be planned accordingly. Off-campus research requires active participation of a Wellesley faculty member throughout the research period. Course fulfills the research requirement for the major only upon the completion of a paper of 8-10 pages on the research and a presentation to the chemistry department during one of the two research seminar presentation periods. A copy of the paper must be submitted to the chair of the department. (Note: Paid internships are not eligible for CHEM 350.)

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Open by permission to students who have taken at least three chemistry courses.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHEM 350H
Research or Individual Study

Research is supervised by a member of the Wellesley College chemistry department. Students will be expected to devote (per week) 10-12 hours for CHEM 350 and five to six hours for CHEM 350H.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHEM 355
Chemistry Thesis Research

The first course in a two-semester investigation of a significant research problem, culminating in the preparation of a thesis and defense of that thesis before a committee of faculty from the chemistry department. Students will participate in a regular weekly seminar program, in which they will discuss their research progress informally with faculty and student colleagues and gain familiarity with contemporary research through presentations by outside seminar speakers. This route does not lead to departmental honors. If the first semester of thesis is used to fulfill the research requirement, the student must complete a paper of 8-10 pages on the research and give a presentation to the chemistry department during one of the two research seminar presentation periods. A copy of the paper must be submitted to the chair of the department. (Note: Paid internships are not eligible for CHEM 355.)

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open only to seniors by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHEM 360
Senior Thesis Research

CHEM 360 is the first course in a two-semester investigation of a significant research problem, culminating in departmental honors upon the completion in the second semester of a thesis and defense of that thesis before a committee of faculty from the chemistry department. Students in 360 and 370 will be expected to attend the weekly departmental honors seminar, listed in the schedule of classes. The seminar provides a forum for students conducting independent research to present their work to fellow students and faculty. (See Academic Distinctions.) If the first semester of thesis is used to fulfill the research requirement, the student must complete a paper of 8-10 pages on the research and give a presentation to the chemistry department during one of the two research seminar presentation periods. A copy of the paper must be submitted to the chair of the department. (Note: Paid internships are not eligible for CHEM 360.)

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHEM 361
Analytical Chemistry with Laboratory

Instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Topics include statistical analysis, electronics and circuitry, electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and separations science with special attention to instrument design and function. The course work emphasizes the practical applications of chemical instrumentation and methods to address questions in areas ranging from art history to biochemistry to materials science. The laboratory work focuses on the design, construction, and use of chemical instrumentation along with the interfacing of instruments with computers.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 8

Prerequisites: CHEM 205 and CHEM 211 or CHEM 120 and CHEM 211. Suggested - PHYS 106 or PHYS 108.

Instructor: Flynn

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHEM 365
Chemistry Thesis

The second course in a two-semester investigation of a significant research problem, culminating in the preparation of a thesis and defense of that thesis before a committee of faculty from the chemistry department. Students will participate in a regular weekly seminar program, in which they will discuss their research progress informally with faculty and student colleagues and gain familiarity with contemporary research through presentations by outside seminar speakers. This route does not lead to departmental honors. Course counts toward the research requirement if the student completes the thesis and the thesis presentation. (Note: Paid internships are not eligible for CHEM 365.)

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHEM 355 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHEM 370
Senior Thesis

CHEM 370 is the second course in a two-semester investigation of a significant research problem, culminating in departmental honors upon the completion of a thesis and defense of that thesis before a committee of faculty from the chemistry department. Students will participate in a regular weekly seminar program, in which they will discuss their research progress informally with faculty and student colleagues and gain familiarity with contemporary research through presentations by outside seminar speakers. Course counts toward the research requirement if the student completes the thesis and the thesis presentation. See Academic Distinctions. (Note: Paid internships are not eligible for CHEM 370.)

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: CHEM 360 and permission of department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHIN 101
Beginning Chinese

An introductory course that teaches the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis is on pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and communication. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar, and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open only to students with no Chinese language background.

Instructor: Tang

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Each semester of CHIN 101 and CHIN 102 earns 1.25 units of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

CHIN 102
Beginning Chinese

An introductory course that teaches the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis is on pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and communication. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar, and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 101 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Tang

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Each semester of CHIN 101 and CHIN 102 earns 1.25 units of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

CHIN 103
Advanced Beginning Chinese

An introductory course that teaches the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis is on pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and communication. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar, and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Placement by the department. Open to students who can speak some Chinese (Mandarin or other Chinese dialect), or who have some knowledge about reading and writing Chinese characters.

Instructor: Tang

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Each semester of CHIN 103 and CHIN 104 earns 1.0 unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

CHIN 104
Advanced Beginning Chinese

An introductory course that teaches the skills of listening comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing in Mandarin Chinese. Emphasis is on pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar, and communication. Computer programs for pronunciation, listening comprehension, grammar, and writing Chinese characters will be used extensively. Three 70-minute classes.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 103 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Zhao

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Each semester of CHIN 103 and CHIN 104 earns 1.0 unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

CHIN 201
Intermediate Chinese

Further training in listening comprehension, oral expression, reading, and writing. Four 75-minute classes plus one 30-minute small group sessions.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 102 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Chen

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Each semester of CHIN 201 and CHIN 202 earns 1.25 unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

CHIN 202
Intermediate Chinese

Further training in listening comprehension, oral expression, reading and writing. Four 75-minute classes plus one 30-minute small group session.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 201 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Chen

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Each semester of CHIN 201 and CHIN 202 earns 1.25 units of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

CHIN 203
Advanced Intermediate Chinese

Further training in listening comprehension, oral expression, reading, and writing. Three 70-minute classes.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites:  CHIN 104 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Zhao

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Each semester of CHIN 203 and CHIN 204 earns 1.0 unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

CHIN 204
Advanced Intermediate Chinese

Further training in listening comprehension, oral expression, reading, and writing. Three 70-minute classes.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 203 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Zhao

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Each semester of CHIN 203 and CHIN 204 earns 1.0 unit of credit; however, both semesters must be completed satisfactorily to receive credit for either course.

CHIN 208
Writing Modern China (in English)

Over the course of the twentieth century, China underwent enormous changes in the sweep of modernization, which opened the door to a wealth of experimentation, especially in literature and culture. The primary focus of this course is to explore how literary forms adapted to the dominant political and cultural movements of modern China. At the same time, individual Chinese writers crafted unique visions from their experiences "on the ground." In works that date from the late Qing to the present, we will explore the varied representations of Chinese modernity, including topics such as the individual and society, revolution and tradition, the countryside and the city, gender and sexuality. No prior knowledge of Chinese literature or Chinese language is required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHIN 211
Dream of the Red Chamber in Chinese Literature and Culture (in English)

Variously known in English as Dream of the Red Chamber, A Dream of Red Mansions, and The Story of the Stone, Honglou meng is the most widely discussed Chinese novel of all time. Written in the mid-eighteenth century, the novel offers telling insight into Chinese culture as it once was and as it remains today. The novel is still wildly popular due to its tragic love story, its sensitive depiction of the plight of the talented woman in late imperial culture, and its narrative intricacies. The goal of the course is to understand the novel both as a literary text and as a cultural phenomenon. Optional extra sessions will accommodate those who wish to read and discuss the novel in Chinese.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHIN 220
The Fall of the Ming in 1644, An Event in World Culture (In English)

The Ming (1368) was a glorious dynasty, and its fall was “heard round the world." The course approaches its glory and fall through novels (such as The Water Margin and The Plum in a Golden Vase), short stories (by Feng Menglong and others), and dramas like Peach Blossom Fan. Elsewhere in East Asia, too, the Ming was a theme in literature, especially at the time of its fall. Works by Chikamatsu (Japanese) and Ho Kyun (Korean) serve as illustrations. Additionally, dramas from Holland and England provide some measure of the impact of this event in Europe. In the last third of the course we will survey this group of writings by non-Chinese and use them to show how reactions varied, depending on the nationality of the observer. Finally, we will read a Cantonese opera composed in the twentieth century. It is one sign of the topic's continuing currency throughout the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), and it highlights south China's longstanding resistance to the Qing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 233
Masterworks of Chinese Fiction

Of China's six great novels, four (Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Outlaws of the Marsh, Journey to the West, and Plum in the Golden Vase) were products of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).  What were the reasons for this important new development in Chinese literature?  They include new patterns in consumption and publishing, among other factors.  And how did this development lead to the emergence of a theory of the novel in the mid-seventeenth century?  Here we will seek to understand the approaches of major theorists.  Finally, how do the four masterworks contrast with the Chinese short story, which underwent a parallel advance at exactly the same time? The difference between complex and simple plots will be our key to an answer.  We will spend two to three weeks on each of the four novels then conclude with a look at some short stories.  Readings and discussions will be in English. Optional sessions discussing short selections of each novel in Chinese will be offered intermittently.  

Two short papers, one short report, and one final paper are required.  No prerequisites for entering the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Ellen Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: The course is offered at the 200 and at the 300 level.

CHIN 239
Popular Culture in Modern China

This course provides a comprehensive examination of modern Chinese popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong from the late Qing to the present. From literature to film, from martial romance to science fiction, from theater to music, this course will probe popular culture as it has manifested itself, and trace its sociopolitical, aesthetic, and affective impact on modern China. Students are required to actively participate in class discussions and under the guidance of the instructor, design and conduct their own research projects to explore some extra dimensions of Chinese popular culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHIN 244
Classical Chinese Theater (in English)

This course covers three basic categories of traditional theater in China. It begins with the short form known as zaju of the Yuan Dynasty (thirteenth to the fourteenth centuries), when dramatic works began to be written by identifiable authors. Next come the long and elaborate chuanqi (or kunqu) of the Ming and Qing Dynasties (fourteenth to twentieth centuries), including the still performed performed Peony Pavilion by Tang Xianzu. The last category is Peking opera, a form that originated during the second half of the Qing Dynasty, around 1790, and is regularly performed today. Most of our dramas were written by men, but we will also look at a few by women. The interrelation between forms will be discussed, as will the effects of the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76 on Peking opera and other opera forms. Lastly such perennial themes as Mulan and The White Snake will be surveyed. This course may be taken as CHIN 244 or, with additional assignments as CHIN 344.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 245
Chinese Women in a Century of Revolution (In English)

The period 1850-1950 witnessed five political revolutions in China. Each one had an impact on the status of women. By the end of the hundred years, the stay-at-home, bound-footed gentlewoman was no more, and old-style dreams in which women changed gender to pursue careers or fight wars had faded away. Instead a whole new reality for women had emerged. This course explores these changes through the writings of male sympathizers, western missionaries, and most importantly Chinese women themselves. In bridging the “late imperial” and “modern” eras and in its emphasis on women’s voices, it offers a distinctive take on the period under review. Although the story is Chinese, it is a part of women’s history worldwide.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHIN 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHIN 301
Advanced Chinese I

This course is designed to further expand students' comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Reading materials will be selected from newspapers, short stories, essays, and films. Three 70-minute classes conducted in Chinese.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 202 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Foti

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHIN 302
Advanced Chinese II

Advanced language skills are further developed through reading, writing, and discussions. Reading materials will be selected from a variety of authentic Chinese texts. Audio and video tapes will be used as study aids. Three 70-minute classes conducted in Chinese.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 301 or placement by the department.

Instructor: Foti

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHIN 306
Advanced Reading in Twentieth-Century Literature and Culture

This course is designed to further expand and refine students' language skills through intensive reading of authentic Chinese materials, such as novels, short stories, essays, and plays and through viewing of contemporary Chinese films. Particular attention will be paid to increasing levels of literary appreciation and to enriching understanding of the sociocultural contexts from which our readings have emerged.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 204 or CHIN 302 or placement by the department.; students entering the course through CHIN 301 are strongly encouraged to first complete CHIN 302 as well.

Instructor: Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CHIN 307
Advanced Readings in Contemporary Issues

A variety of authentic materials, including films and literary works, will be selected to cover the period from 1949 to the early twenty-first century.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 204 or CHIN 302 or placement by the department; students entering the course through CHIN 301 are strongly encouraged to first complete CHIN 302 as well.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 311
Dream of the Red Chamber in Chinese Literature and Culture (in English)

Variously known in English as Dream of the Red Chamber, A Dream of Red Mansions, and The Story of the Stone, Honglou meng is the most widely discussed Chinese novel of all time. Written in the mid-eighteenth century, the novel offers telling insight into Chinese culture as it once was and as it remains today. The novel is still wildly popular due to its tragic love story, its sensitive depiction of the plight of the talented woman in late imperial culture, and its narrative intricacies. The goal of the course is to understand the novel both as a literary text and as a cultural phenomenon. Optional extra sessions will accommodate those who wish to read and discuss the novel in Chinese. This course may be taken as CHIN 211 or, with additional assignments, as CHIN 311.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: One previous course on Chinese history or culture.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHIN 320
The Fall of the Ming in 1644, An Event in World Culture (In English)

The Ming (1368) was a glorious dynasty, and its fall was “heard round the world." The course approaches its glory and fall through novels (such as The Water Margin and The Plum in a Golden Vase), short stories (by Feng Menglong and others), and dramas like Peach Blossom Fan. Elsewhere in East Asia, too, the Ming was a theme in literature, especially at the time of its fall. Works by Chikamatsu (Japanese) and Ho Kyun (Korean) serve as illustrations. Additionally, dramas from Holland and England provide some measure of the impact of this event in Europe. In the last third of the course we will survey this group of writings by non-Chinese and use them to show how reactions varied, depending on the nationality of the observer. Finally, we will read a Cantonese opera composed in the twentieth century. It is one sign of the topic's continuing currency throughout the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), and it highlights south China's longstanding resistance to the Qing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 326
The City in Modern Chinese Literature and Film (in English)

This seminar will focus on one of the most important topics of modern Chinese culture: the urban imagination. Analyzing how metropolis and urban life are represented and imagined is central to an understanding of the differently articulated forms Chinese modernity has taken throughout the twentieth century. We will examine the literary and visual representations of the city in modern China through close analyses of the novels, short stories, films, photographs, and paintings that illuminate Chinese urbanism. Cultural manifestations of such Chinese metropolises as Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Taipei will be extensively discussed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One course at the 200 or 300 level in East Asian languages and literatures, East Asian arts, history, philosophy, or religion.

Instructor: Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 333
Masterworks of Chinese Fiction

Of China's six great novels, four (Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Outlaws of the Marsh, Journey to the West, and Plum in the Golden Vase) were products of the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644).  What were the reasons for this important new development in Chinese literature?  They include new patterns in consumption and publishing, among other factors.  And how did this development lead to the emergence of a theory of the novel in the mid-seventeenth century?  Here we will seek to understand the approaches of major theorists.  Finally, how do the four masterworks contrast with the Chinese short story, which underwent a parallel advance at exactly the same time? The difference between complex and simple plots will be our key to an answer.  We will spend two to three weeks on each of the four novels then conclude with a look at some short stories.  Readings and discussions will be in English. Optional sessions discussing short selections of each novel in Chinese will be offered intermittently.  Compared to CHIN 233, this course will have one extra paper and one extra report.

Three short papers, two short reports, and one final paper are required. Students should have taken one previous course in Chinese culture or history.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

Instructor: Ellen Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course is offered at the 200 and 300 level. Students in the 300 level are expected to complete extra work.

CHIN 338
Reading in Modern Chinese Literature

This course guides students to explore Chinese literary modernity through authentic literary texts written by major Chinese writers of the past hundred years. It aims to give students the opportunity to deepen their understanding of modern China in both its historical and cultural practice. Instead of language training, literary and cultural analyses will be emphasized. Class discussions will be conducted in Chinese, and students are expected to offer their critical responses to readings through oral presentations and papers written in Chinese.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 306, CHIN 307, or placement by the department.

Instructor: Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 344
Classical Chinese Theater (in English)

This course covers three basic categories of traditional theater in China. It begins with the short form known as zaju of the Yuan Dynasty (thirteenth to the fourteenth centuries), when dramatic works began to be written by identifiable authors. Next come the long and elaborate chuanqi (or kunqu) of the Ming and Qing Dynasties (fourteenth to twentieth centuries), including the still performed performed Peony Pavilion by Tang Xianzu. The last category is Peking opera, a form that originated during the second half of the Qing Dynasty, around 1790, and is regularly performed today. Most of our dramas were written by men, but we will also look at a few by women. The interrelation between forms will be discussed, as will the effects of the Cultural Revolution of 1966-76 on Peking opera and other opera forms. Lastly such perennial themes as Mulan and The White Snake will be surveyed. This course may be taken as CHIN 244 or, with additional assignments as CHIN 344.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: One previous course in Chinese history or culture.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 345
Chinese Women in a Century of Revolution (In English)

The period 1850-1950 witnessed five political revolutions in China. Each one had an impact on the status of women. By the end of the hundred years, the stay-at-home, bound-footed gentlewoman was no more, and old-style dreams in which women changed gender to pursue careers or fight wars had faded away. Instead a whole new reality for women had emerged. This course explores these changes through the writings of male sympathizers, western missionaries, and most importantly Chinese women themselves. In bridging the “late imperial” and “modern” eras and in its emphasis on women's voices, it offers a distinctive take on the period under review. Although the story is Chinese, it is a part of women's history worldwide. Additional reading and writings will be assigned to students with advanced-level Chinese reading proficiency. This course may be taken as CHIN 245 or, with additional assignments, as CHIN 345.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: One prior course in EALC, EAS or WGST.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHIN 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHIN 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CHIN 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CHIN 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CHIN 381
Eileen Chang (in English)

This seminar offers an intensive study of the writings of Eileen Chang, one of the most important Chinese writers. Close analysis of her literary style will be combined with discussions on such key concepts of the Chinese literary modernity: gender, nation, cosmopolitanism, affectivity, subjectivity, and diaspora. Her major works will be read in biographical, historical and cultural contexts, with considerations of the classical novels influencing her as well as the modern and postmodern writers and filmmakers working under her influences.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One course at the 200 or 300 level on Chinese literature, history or culture, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CHIN 382
Seminar: Science Fiction and the Future of China (In English)

This seminar guides students to explore the political, cultural, and epistemological changes represented in Chinese science fiction. It contextualizes the genre’s evolution in the intellectual history of modern China, where imagining the future of China is often the focus of contending ideologies and intellectual trends. The course introduces students to three booms of Chinese science fiction, which all happened when China went through drastic changes. The contemporary new wave of science fiction particularly presents a subversive vision of China’s pursuit of power and wealth, a dystopian counterpart to the government-promoted “Chinese dream.” This course examines the cutting-edge literary experiments that characterize the new wave, and studies the transgression of gender, class, and nation in science fiction that evokes sensations ranging from the uncanny to the sublime, from the corporeal to the virtual, and from the apocalyptic to the transcendent.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One course at the 200 or 300 level on Chinese literature, history or culture, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Song

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CHPH 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHPH 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CHPH 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CHPH 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 2

Max Enrollment: 0

Prerequisites: CHPH 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CLCV 104
Greek and Roman Mythology

Achilles' heel, the Trojan Horse, Pandora's Box, an Oedipal complex, a Herculean task-themes and figures from classical mythology continue to play an important role in our everyday life. We will read the original tales of classical heroes and heroines as depicted by Homer, the Greek tragedians, Vergil, Ovid, and others. Why do these stories continue to engage, entertain, and even shock us? What is the nature and power of myth? Readings from ancient sources in English translation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Wise (Spring), Dougherty (Summer)

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Summer; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CLCV 106
Daily Life in Ancient Greece and Rome

Daily life in ancient Greece and Rome, from the ordinary activities of everyday life (family life; work and leisure; shopping, cooking and eating; games and entertainment; going to see a gladiatorial show or an athletic contest or a play; parties) to the turning points of an individual's life (birth, initiation into adulthood, marriage, childbirth, old age, death). The rhythm of a year as expressed in festivals and holidays. The practices, customs, and shared beliefs that gave meaning and structure to the lives of both individuals and cultures. A mix of lecture, discussion, and case studies based on the lives of real people. Assignments drawn from a wide variety of ancient sources in translation, from cookbooks to personal letters to tombstone inscriptions to some of the greatest literature in the Western tradition.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Starr

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CLCV 200
Political Archaeology: The City-States of Ancient Greece

The Parthenon with its polished white and perfectly arranged marble columns symbolizes ancient Greece for many, but the story extends far beyond Athens. The rise of the polis (city-state) is a development attested primarily in archaeological excavations, and material evidence enables the study of Greek cities across the Mediterranean. This course examines the societal organization of Athens alongside other city-states in mainland Greece, such as Sparta, Corinth, and Thebes, as informed by the latest discoveries. Colonial sites established from North Africa to the Black Sea to Sicily offer important comparisons, especially since many aspects of a common Greek identity emerged through interaction with other Mediterranean cultures.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Burns

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course may be taken as either CLCV 200 or, with additional assignments, CLCV 300.

CLCV 202
Culture and Politics of Ancient Athens

In the fifth century B.C.E., Athens was home to great intellectual ferment as well as political growth and crisis. This cultural revolution resulted in significant artistic and intellectual accomplishments: Pericles oversaw the building of the Acropolis; citizens saw productions of Oedipus Tyrannos, Medea, and Lysistrata; and Herodotus and Thucydides invented the genre of history as we know it. On the political front, Athens defended itself against the Persian empire, developed into the most powerful city-state in the Mediterranean, and then dramatically fell as the result of failed imperial policy. In the early fourth century, Plato engaged with the political and intellectual conflicts of this period in The Apology and The Symposium. In this course, students will consider works of philosophy, history, tragedy, comedy, rhetoric, and political theory in their cultural and political context. We will examine and interrogate Athenian democracy, its conflicts, and its stunning and influential cultural achievements.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 40

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Gilhuly

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CLCV 205
Ancient Spectacle

Roman chariot races and gladiatorial combat were not just entertainment for the masses, just as the ancient Olympic games were much more than sporting events. Athletic competitions, theatrical performances, and militaristic parades were all public enactments of political and religious ideology. This course examines the spectacle of competitive performances and rituals of power that helped shape ancient Greek and Roman society. Students will investigate ancient writings alongside art-historical and archaeological evidence to consider how social values and identities were constructed through these shared experiences. We will also consider how the modern performances of ancient texts, the Olympic Games, and cinematic representations have emphasized the splendor, drama, and gore of antiquity.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Burns

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course may be taken as either CLCV 205, or, with additional assignments, CLCV 305. Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

CLCV 206
Gods and Heroes

The mythic tales of gods and heroes featured in the epic poems, sacred hymns, and tragic theatre of Greece and Rome were also present in material form as votive statues, on painted vessels, and in architectural decoration. This course will focus on the interplay between textual and visual representations of Olympian deities like Zeus, Hera, and Poseidon; legendary figures such as Heracles, Theseus, and the heroes of the Trojan War; and the infamous women of myth: Helen, Clytemnestra, and Medea. We will analyze how visions of the heroic age-replete with legendary battles, divine seductions, and exotic monsters-provided ancient societies with new opportunities to create a shared history, foster ethnic and civic identity, and transmit ideological values about age and gender. Regular trips to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Burns

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CLCV 210
Greek Drama

The Athenian playwrights of the Classical period, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes, produced brilliant tragedies and comedies that continue to engage us today and to define our notion of drama. At the same time, the Athenian people forged the principles that form the basis for our own political institutions. The element of performance, common to both drama and democracy, provides an important key to understanding this interesting confluence of theater and politics, and this class will combine the close reading (in English) of ancient Greek drama with a consideration of the plays in their context. We will also address the interplay between Greek tragedy and comedy, assessing each genre's capacity for social and political criticism as well as the subversion of Athenian values and norms.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Dougherty

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: This course may be taken as either CLCV 210, or, with additional assignments, CLCV 310.

CLCV 212
On the Road with Odysseus, Huck, Thelma and Louise: Travel in Fiction and Film

Every story is a travel story, and if you can't travel this summer, you can always read about it! This class explores the theme of travel in fiction and film. Beginning with Homer's Odyssey, a text that maps out the key themes of movement, homecoming, escape, and coming of age that resurfaces in the works of Mark Twain, Jamaica Kincaid and Michael Ondaatje and films like Thelma and Louise and O Brother Where Art Thou?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Dougherty

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CLCV 213
Gender in Ancient Greece and Rome

Do notions of gender change over time? In this course, we will explore how gender was constructed in ancient Greece and Rome and how it functioned as an organizational principle. Through close readings of selections from Greek and Roman epics, lyric poetry and drama, as well as philosophical and historical texts, we will analyze ancient gender norms, exploring how they were bent, dressed up, and used.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Gilhuly

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course may be taken as either CLCV 213 or, with additional assignments, CLCV 313.

CLCV 220/ MAS 220
Digital Archaeology: Emergent Approaches to Excavations in Greece

Digital technologies are transforming the ability of archaeologists to accurately record excavation, analyze artifacts, and restore fragmentary finds through virtual models/animation. This intensive, interdisciplinary course will introduce students to innovative practices in the application of new media to archaeological field work including two weeks based in central Greece. Students will learn how to create 3D models of artifacts, architecture, and archaeological contexts using drones and aerial photography, photogrammetry, and 3D digital scanners. As members of the international team pursuing the excavations at ancient Eleon, students will participate in the analysis of finds dating from the Late Bronze Age through Classical period, including human remains, ceramics, metal tools, and sculpted figurines. They will also document the spatial relationships of digital models through three-dimensional mapping, Geographical Information Systems, and virtual reality environments. Students’ final project will position their own creations within the discussion surrounding the standards of representation in traditional academic formats and new digital opportunities, the ethics of replication and online distribution, and the relationships between 3D modeling. virtual/augmented reality, and material fabrication.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 8

Crosslisted Courses: MAS 220

Prerequisites: Enrollment by application.

Instructor: Burns, Tynes

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Summer

Notes:

CLCV 227
Wintersession in Athens: Archaeology & Religion

This intensive travel course will explore the dynamics of ancient Greek ritual through direct engagement with the evidence preserved at archaeological sites and museums. Tracing developments from the Bronze Age through Roman periods, we will examine the interplay between ideology and landscape, between communal action and built environments. Our study will begin with the religious and political dynamics that integrated Attica, from the central spaces of the acropolis and agora to rural settlements and coastal landmarks. Traveling beyond Athens, we will explore the Mycenaean citadels of the Argolid, the major pan-Hellenic centers of Olympia and Delphi, and sites dedicated to the commemoration of regional heroes and heroines.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: 200-level course in Ancient Greek, Classical Civilization, or related field. Application required.

Instructor: Burns

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not offered every year. Subject to Provost's Office approval.

CLCV 230
War: From Troy to Baghdad

War is undoubtedly bad. But human beings have always practiced war. Indeed, war preceded history itself by tens of thousands of years-if by history we mean the written inquiry into the past. But what causes wars? How have wars been justified historically? How are wars won and lost? What are their effects? In this class, we examine a series of case studies in warfare, including the Trojan War, the Peloponnesian War, and the Roman Punic Wars. We will read classic accounts of warfare and theoretical literature about tactics, strategy, and logistics, and also will analyze how war is represented in other media, such as art and film.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Rogers

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CLCV 236
Greek and Roman Religion

The founders of Western civilization were not monotheists. Rather, from 1750 B.C.E. until 500 C.E., the ancient Greeks and Romans sacrificed daily to a pantheon of immortal gods and goddesses who were expected to help mortals achieve their earthly goals. How did this system of belief develop? Why did it capture the imaginations of so many millions for more than 2,000 years? What impact did the religion of the Greeks and Romans have upon the other religions of the Mediterranean, including Judaism and Christianity? Why did the religion of the Greeks and Romans ultimately disappear?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Rogers

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course may be taken as either CLCV 236 or, with additional assignments, CLCV 336.

CLCV 240/ REL 240
Romans, Jews, and Christians in the Roman Empire

At the birth of the Roman Empire virtually all of its inhabitants were practicing polytheists. Three centuries later, the Roman Emperor Constantine was baptized as a Christian and his successors eventually banned public sacrifices to the gods and goddesses who had been traditionally worshipped around the Mediterranean. This course will examine Roman-era Judaism, Graeco-Roman polytheism, and the growth of the Jesus movement into the dominant religion of the late antique world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CLCV 240

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Geller

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CLCV 241
Running a Business in Ancient Rome

Ancient Rome’s economy was pre-industrial but highly developed and sophisticated. We will study fundamental large-scale questions such as the labor force with both free and slave labor, raw materials acquisition, start-up capital, transportation by land and sea, state involvement in the economy, banking, production methods, marketing, and retail trade. We will also study how individual businesses and trades operated, such as restaurants, furniture making, agriculture, pottery production, construction, stonework, lodging, sex work, handcrafts, textile and clothing production, dry-cleaning, and professional services (e.g., education). What modern models and approaches, including behavioral economics, help us understand ancient Roman businesses? Possible projects include case studies, consultations with modern craftspeople, and development of business plans.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Starr

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CLCV 243
Roman Law

Ancient Roman civil law; its early development, codification, and continuing alteration; its historical and social context (property, family, slavery); its influence on other legal systems. Extensive use of actual cases from antiquity.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Starr

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CLCV 245
Race and Ethnicity in the Classical World

This course aims to introduce students to ancient thinking about race and ethnicity, and to consider how that thinking remains current and influential today. Tacitus' Germania, for instance, played a fundamental role in shaping Nazi ideology of the “Aryan” race; and Aeschylus' Persians is the first recorded usage of the word “Barbarian” - a word that would later provide many justifications for racial injustice. Race is a social construct, inflected with pseudo-biological, post-enlightenment concepts; the racialized thinking in antiquity was thus radically different from how we perceive difference in the modern world. In this course, we will investigate how categories of race and ethnicity are presented in the literature of the Ancient Mediterranean from Homer, Herodotus, and Aeschylus to Vergil, Caesar, and Tacitus.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

CLCV 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CLCV 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CLCV 300
Political Archaeology: The City-States of Ancient Greece

The Parthenon with its polished white and perfectly arranged marble columns symbolizes ancient Greece for many, but the story extends far beyond Athens. The rise of the polis (city-state) is a development attested primarily in archaeological excavations, and material evidence enables the study of Greek cities across the Mediterranean. This course examines the societal organization of Athens alongside other city-states in mainland Greece, such as Sparta, Corinth, and Thebes, as informed by the latest discoveries. Colonial sites established from North Africa to the Black Sea to Sicily offer important comparisons, especially since many aspects of a common Greek identity emerged through interaction with other Mediterranean cultures.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Instructor: Burns

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course may be taken as either CLCV 200 or, with additional assignments, CLCV 300.

CLCV 305
Ancient Spectacle

Roman chariot races and gladiatorial combat were not just entertainment for the masses, just as the ancient Olympic games were much more than sporting events. Athletic competitions, theatrical performances, and militaristic parades were all public enactments of political and religious ideology. This course examines the spectacle of competitive performances and rituals of power that helped shape ancient Greek and Roman society. Students will investigate ancient writings alongside art-historical and archaeological evidence to consider how social values and identities were constructed through these shared experiences. We will also consider how the modern performances of ancient texts, the Olympic Games, and cinematic representations have emphasized the splendor, drama, and gore of antiquity.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Burns

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course may be taken as either CLCV 205, or, with additional assignments, CLCV 305. Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

CLCV 310
Greek Drama

The Athenian playwrights of the fifth century, BCE, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes, produced brilliant tragedies and comedies that continue to engage us today and to define our notion of drama. At the same time, the Athenian people forged the democratic principles that form the basis for our own political institutions. The element of performance, common to both drama and democracy, provides an important key to understanding this interesting confluence of theater and politics, and this class will combine the close reading (in English) of ancient Greek drama with a consideration of the plays in their context. We will also address the interplay between Greek tragedy and comedy, assessing each genre's capacity for social and political criticism as well as the subversion of Athenian values and norms.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Dougherty

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: The course may be taken as either CLCV 210 or, with additional assignments, CLCV 310.

CLCV 313
Gender in Antiquity

Do notions of gender change over time? In this course, we will explore how gender was constructed in antiquity and how it functioned as an organizational principle. Through close readings of selections from Greek and Roman epics, lyric poetry and drama, as well as philosophical and historical texts, we will analyze ancient gender norms, exploring how they were bent, dressed up, and used.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Gilhuly

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course may be taken as either CLCV 213 or, with additional assignments, CLCV 313

CLCV 330
War: From Troy to Baghdad

War is undoubtedly bad. But human beings have always practiced war. Indeed, war preceded history itself by tens of thousands of years-if by history we mean the written inquiry into the past. But what causes wars? How have wars been justified historically? How are wars won and lost? What are their effects? In this class, we examine a series of case studies in warfare, including the Trojan War, the Peloponnesian War, and the Roman Punic Wars. We will read classic accounts of warfare, theoretical literature about tactics, strategy, and logistics, and also will analyze how war is represented in other media, such as art and film.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor required.

Instructor: Rogers

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CLCV 336
Greek and Roman Religion

The founders of Western civilization were not monotheists. Rather, from 1750 B.C.E. until 500 C.E., the ancient Greeks and Romans sacrificed daily to a pantheon of immortal gods and goddesses who were expected to help mortals to achieve their earthly goals. How did this system of belief develop? Why did it capture the imaginations of so many millions for over 2,000 years? What impact did the religion of the Greeks and Romans have upon the other religions of the Mediterranean, including Judaism and Christianity? Why did the religion of the Greeks and Romans ultimately disappear?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Rogers

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: This course may be taken as either CLCV 236 or, with additional assignments, CLCV 336.

CLCV 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CLCV 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CLCV 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CLCV 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: CLCV 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CLSC 214/ PSYC 214
Evolution and Human Behavior

Evolutionary Psychology is the scientific study of human nature as shaped by natural selection. It is grounded in evolutionary biology and the psychological sciences with connections to disciplines ranging from neuroscience to anthropology and economics. Topics covered will include adaptive solutions to major life challenges including survival, mating, family relations, and group living (e.g., cooperation, aggression, and status).

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: PSYC 214

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or NEUR 100, AP score of 5 on the Psychology AP exam, or a score of 5, 6, or 7 on the Higher Level IB exam,or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Lucas

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis; EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CLSC 216/ PSYC 216
Psychology of Language

Introduction to the study of the psychological processes underlying language ability. Topics covered will include the biological and evolutionary foundations of language, child and adult language acquisition, reading, and sound, word, and sentence processing. We will also consider whether language is unique to humans, whether it is innate, and the degree to which language influences thought.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: PSYC 216

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 or NEUR 100, a score of 5 on the Psychology AP exam, or a score of 5, 6, or 7 on the Higher Level IB exam, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Lucas

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CLSC 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CLSC 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Open by permission of the instructor to first-year students and sophomores.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CLSC 300/ PSYC 300
Seminar. Topics in Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences

Topic for 2019-20: How We Choose

Topic for 2019-20: How We Choose

Every day we make many choices. Some of these choices are trivial but some can have profound effects on our lives. In this interdisciplinary course, we will investigate how individuals make choices, examining processes of decision-making that are often intuitive and irrational. Topics include biases that lead to poor choices, loss aversion, sunk costs, risk-taking, impulsiveness, moral choice, and group decision-making.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: PSYC 300

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have taken one of PSYC 214, PSYC 215, CLSC/PSYC 216, PSYC 217, PSYC 218, PSYC 219, LING 114, PHIL 215, or CS 111, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Lucas

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CLSC 316/ PSYC 316
Seminar: Language Acquisition

Children around the world acquire their first language, spoken or signed, with seemingly little effort. By the end of their first year, they are saying their first words, and a mere two years later they are speaking in full sentences. What are the biological, cognitive, and environmental factors that that play into children’s rapid language learning? What do special cases of language acquisition, such as bilingualism, disordered language development (e.g., autism, dyslexia), and sign language tell us about the human capacity to learn language? We will consider all of these questions and more. In addition, we will spend time observing children of different ages to witness language acquisition in action.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: CLSC 316

Prerequisites: Two 200-level courses in PSYC (excluding PSYC 205) or LING, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Jennie Pyers

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CLSC 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

CLSC 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the director.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CLSC 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: CLSC 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CLST 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CLST 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CLST 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CLST 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CLST 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CPLT 113/ ENG 103
Beyond Borders: Writers of Color Across the Globe?

This course takes a whirlwind tour of the world through the imaginative literature of writers of color across the world. Although each work will provide a distinct and exhilarating experience, a number of overlapping threads will connect the works in various ways: generational change and conflict amidst cross-cultural encounters; evolving ideas of love and identity; the persistence of suffering, among others. The syllabus will likely include the following works: Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart; Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude; Haruki Murakami's Japanese love song to youth and the Beatles, Norwegian Wood; Marjane Satrapi's graphic novel of an Iranian childhood, Persepolis; the Indian writer Arundhati Roy's God of Small Things, and Min-Gyu Park's contemporary novel about Korea, Pavane for a Dead Princess. Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Crosslisted Courses: CPLT 113

Prerequisites: Not open to students who have taken this course as a topic of ENG 113.

Instructor: Ko

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CPLT 180/ ENG 180
What is World Literature?

"World Literature” views a literary work as the product of local culture, then of regional or national culture, and finally of global culture. Critics of world literature argue that a text's richness may be lost in translation, that too often a privileged Western literary tradition forces “other” literatures into a relationship of belatedness and inferiority, and that world literature leads to the globalization of culture-and as the global language becomes predominantly English, the world of literature will be known through that single language alone. This course offers an opportunity to not only read rich and exciting literary texts from ancient eras to the contemporary moment but also after reading key critical essays that defend and critique “World Literature” to reflect on the cultural politics that directly or indirectly determines who reads what. Range of texts from contemporary Arabic short fiction, science fiction from China and Africa, global gothic fiction, and poetic forms across time and cultures. Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Crosslisted Courses: CPLT 180

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Sides

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CPLT 200
Graphic Novel - Digital Texts

Intrigued by the complex relationship between image and text, this course will survey major moments in the emergence of the graphic novel and in the development of digital texts in general. We will develop a vocabulary to analyze both the narrative and visual dimensions of the texts at hand to understand what it means to “read,” to “play,“ or to interact with visual and computer-based texts. As a comparative literature course, the syllabus will include texts belonging to different literary traditions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Nolden (German Studies)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

CPLT 208/ REL 208
Legend, Satire, and Storytelling in the Hebrew Bible

The art of narrative composition in the Hebrew Bible. The literary techniques and conventions of ancient Israelite authors in the Bible's rich corpus of stories. Philosophical and aesthetic treatment of themes such as kingship, power, gender, and covenant. Primary focus on the role of narrative in the cultural life of ancient Israel, with attention also to the difficulties of interpreting biblical stories from within our contemporary milieu.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: CPLT 20 8

Prerequisites: None

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CPLT 225
Digital Media & Culture

In this course, we will analyze some of the profound changes that digital media have brought to traditional ways of reading & writing, playing, interacting with others, and learning. Starting out with a discussion of digital texts / hyperfiction, we will look into new forms of narrating and reading before focusing on the way we connect with others - and ourselves - by using social media. The last unit of the course will cover the implications of digital media for the way we learn and know things.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Nolden

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CPLT 236/ EALC 236
The Girl in Modern East Asian Culture (In English)

In East Asia, the rise of the girl in literary and popular culture coincides with the appearance of modernity itself. Beginning with the ‘modern girl,' we move chronologically, exploring coming-of-age tropes in East Asian fiction, manga, anime, and film. How does the objectification of the adolescent girl illuminate issues around ethnicity, national identity, sexuality, even globalization? What national anxieties hover around girls' bodies? We read texts in English translation and explore models of female development that might aid us in our exploration of this cultural phenomenon. Secondary readings include works by Sigmund Freud, Julia Kristeva, Marianne Hirsch, Carol Gilligan, Elizabeth Grosz, among others.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: CPLT 236

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Zimmerman

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CPLT 247/ ENG 247/ MER 247
Arthurian Legends

The legends of King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table, with their themes of chivalry, magic, friendship, war, adventure, corruption, and nostalgia, as well as romantic love and betrayal, make up one of the most influential and enduring mythologies in European culture. This course will examine literary interpretations of the Arthurian legend, in history, epic, and romance, from the sixth century through the sixteenth. We will also consider some later examples of Arthuriana, on page and movie screen, in the Victorian and modern periods.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: MER 247,CPLT 247

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Wall-Randell

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CPLT 275/ ENG 275
Translation and the Multilingual World

A study of translation in theory and in practice, in its literal and metaphorical senses alike, and of the multilingual world in which translation takes place. Topics: translation of literary texts, translation of sacred texts, the history and politics of translation, the lives of translators, translation and gender, machine translation, adaptation as translation. Students taking the course at the 300 level will do a substantial independent project: a translation, a scholarly inquiry, or a combination of the two.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: CPLT 275

Prerequisites: One course in literature (in any language) or permission of the instructor. Competence in a language or languages other than English is useful but not necessary. Open to students who have taken WRIT 118/ENG 118.

Instructor: Rosenwald

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CPLT 284
Magical Realism

This course examines fictions whose basic reality would be familiar if not for the introduction of a magical element that undermines commonplace notions about what constitutes reality in the first place. The magical element can be a demon, talisman, physical transformation, miraculous transition in space or time, appearance of a second plane of existence, revelation of the unreality of the primary plane of existence, etc. Students will read Kafka's Metamorphosis, Queneau's The Blue Flowers, Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita, Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, Calvino's If on a Winter's Night a Traveler, Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49, Murakami's Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World and Sokolov's School for Fools, and short stories by Borges, Cortazar, and Nabokov.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 40

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Weiner (Russian)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CPLT 294
Utopia and Dystopia in Literature

In his Republic Plato described his utopia as a land where people are divided into four classes depending on their intelligence, where a philosopher-king rules over all, and a guardian class spies and protects, where private property is forbidden and where children are taken from their parents to be raised for the state and taught only things that will increase their loyalty to the state. Eugenics is practiced, literature banished. Plato's vision has inspired socialist utopian fantasies and dystopian warnings alike. Students will read Nikolai Chernyshevsky's What's to Be Done?, H.G. Wells' Time Machine and A Modern Utopia, Evgeny Zamyatin's We, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, George Orwell's 1984, Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. We will examine the ideas and plans of Plato, Charles Fourier, Jeremy Bentham, Charles Darwin, Cecil Rhodes and others as they take shape on the pages of the novels we read. And we will consider the extent to which the utopias we read are prophesy or proscription.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Weiner

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CPLT 310/ FREN 330
French, Francophone and Postcolonial Studies

This course examines texts that foreground pressing concerns of the postcolonial world: in Africa, the Creole islands of the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean. France's postcolonialism is also studied. Close attention will be paid to the relationship of a colonial culture to that of the metropolis, the functioning of minority and majority languages, and the narrative techniques that make these differences manifest in fictional and theoretical writing. The course includes discussion of postcolonial theory and its many debates.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: CPLT 310

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Prabhu

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CPLT 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the director. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

CPLT 359/ FREN 359
Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Advocating for Other Cultures (in English)

Say your local school board is considering eliminating foreign language instruction at the high school. You think it’s a bad idea. How will you make your voice heard? This seminar will explore writing that challenges language majors and students interested in other cultures to rethink and repurpose their academic knowledge, shaping it to contribute to public debates, writing not for "the professor" but for the real world. Pieces may include op-eds and letters to the editor; book, film and music reviews; blogs; and interviews with notables in the field. Students will sharpen their skills as both writers and editors, writing in alternate weeks and revising their work in response to comments from their peers and from the instructor. The contributions of students from different language backgrounds will introduce participants to the assumptions, perspectives and approaches of other cultures, inviting all to become advocates for a wider, more inclusive cultural literacy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: CPLT 359

Prerequisites: At least two courses at the advanced 200 level or the 300 level in the major department.

Instructor: Lydgate

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Open to junior and senior majors in the foreign language departments and related programs, and in Classical Studies and Comparative Literature, and by permission of the instructor.

CPLT 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the director.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CPLT 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: CPLT 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CPLT 375/ ENG 375
Translation and the Multilingual World

A study of translation in theory and in practice, in its literal and metaphorical senses alike, and of the multilingual world in which translation takes place. Topics: translation of literary texts, translation of sacred texts, the history and politics of translation, the lives of translators, translation and gender, machine translation, adaptation as translation. Students taking the course at the 300 level will do a substantial independent project: a translation, a scholarly inquiry, or a combination of the two.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: CPLT 375

Prerequisites: One course in literature (in any language) or permission of the instructor. Competence in a language or languages other than English is useful but not necessary. Open to students who have taken WRIT 118/ENG 118.

Instructor: Rosenwald

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CS 111
Computer Programming and Problem Solving

An introduction to problem solving through computer programming. Students learn how to read, modify, design, debug, and test algorithms that solve problems. Programming concepts include control structures, data structures, abstraction, recursion, modularity, and object-oriented design. Students explore these concepts in the context of interactive programs involving graphics and user interfaces using the Python programming language. Students are required to attend an additional two-hour laboratory section each week. Required for students who wish to major or minor in computer science or elect more advanced courses in the field.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. No prior background with computers is expected.

Instructor: Davis, Freire, Lerner, Singh, Wood

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Does not fulfill the laboratory requirement.

CS 112
Computation for the Sciences

An introduction to computer programming that provides the tools necessary for students to use computers effectively in scientific work, including physical sciences, biological sciences, medicine, mathematics, psychology, and economics. Students learn to write software to solve problems, visualize and analyze data, perform computer simulations, and implement and test computational models that arise in a wide range of scientific disciplines. The course introduces MATLAB, an extensive and widely used technical computing environment with advanced graphics, visualization, and analysis tools, and a rich high-level programming language. Students are required to attend an additional two-hour laboratory section each week.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. No prior background with computers is expected.

Instructor: Hildreth

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Does not fulfill the laboratory requirement.

CS 115/ MAS 115
Computing for the Socio-Techno Web

Technologies and services made available from Computer Science, such as online environments Facebook, Twitter, and Wikipedia, are integral in today's world. Many problems exist in our real world that transfer to and get amplified in the virtual world created by highly interconnected and ubiquitous computing. What are the basic technologies that enable all this innovation? How do these new environments affect our lives? This course aims to answer these questions through investigation of the socio-techno web. On the technical side we study three languages: HTML5, CSS, and basic JavaScript. We interweave the technical with the social aspects by examining issues introduced by the use of the Social Web. In the process we learn how computers work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 24

Crosslisted Courses: MAS 115

Prerequisites: This course is open to Firstyears and Sophomores, others by permission.

Instructor: Bassem, Mustafaraj

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Normally mandatory credit/noncredit.

CS 125Y/ NEUR 125Y
First-Year Seminar: Brains, Minds, and Machines: The Science of Intelligence

How is intelligent behavior produced by the brain and how can it be replicated in machines? This seminar explores human intelligence through the perspectives of neuroscience, cognitive science, and computer science, integrating studies of the brain, the mind, and the computations needed to create intelligent machines. This interdisciplinary approach has accelerated the pace of research aimed at understanding how intelligent agents use vision to recognize objects and events; navigate through a complex, dynamic environment; use language to communicate; and develop a conscious awareness of the world. Through exploration of current research and hands-on computer activities, students learn about methods used to probe neural circuits and visualize brain activity; investigate human performance and behavior; and build computer models that capture the remarkable abilities of biological systems.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 0

Crosslisted Courses: NEUR 125Y

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Hildreth, Wiest

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CS 203
Computer Music

This course explores how computer code can be used to produce music by examining topics such as digital signal processing, synthesis, protocols, networking, and modeling. Students work with a computer environment called SuperCollider, an open-source software designed for real-time audio synthesis. Students complete weekly programming assignments and create music ranging from synthesizer tracks in popular songs to experimental algorithmic compositions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS111

Instructor: Andrew Davis

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CS 204
Introduction to Front-End Web Development

This course introduces modern web development using HTML, CSS and JavaScript. JavaScript is explored in detail, including scoping, closures, objects, prototype inheritance, and namespacing. The jQuery library is also introduced, and the course covers event handling and Ajax interactions. Students will build web pages using front-end templates such as bootstrap and JavaScript libraries for client-side templating. Designed web pages will be modern, responsive and accessible. The course also covers the jQuery UI (User Interface) library and its capabilities.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 111 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Anderson

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CS 220
Human-Computer Interaction

Human-Computer Interaction is one of the areas that have transformed the way we use computers in the last 30 years. Topics include methodology for designing and testing user interfaces, interaction styles (command line, menus, graphical user interfaces, virtual reality, tangible user interfaces), interaction techniques (including use of voice, gesture, eye movements), design guidelines, and user interface software tools. Students will design a user interface, program a prototype, and test the results for usability.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: One of CS 110, CS 111, CS 112, CS/MAS 115, CS 117.

Instructor: Delcourt

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CS 230
Data Structures

An introduction to techniques and building blocks for organizing large programs. Topics include: modules, abstract data types, recursion, algorithmic efficiency, and the use and implementation of standard data structures and algorithms, such as lists, trees, graphs, stacks, queues, priority queues, tables, sorting, and searching. Students become familiar with these concepts through weekly programming assignments using the Java programming language. Students are required to attend an additional two-hour laboratory section each week.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 26

Prerequisites: CS 111 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Bassem, Delcourt, Lerner, Metaxas

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Does not fulfill the laboratory requirement.

CS 231
Fundamental Algorithms

An introduction to the design and analysis of fundamental algorithms. General techniques covered: divide-and-conquer algorithms, dynamic programming, greediness, probabilistic algorithms. Topics include: sorting, searching, graph algorithms, compression, cryptography, computational geometry, and NP-completeness.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 24

Prerequisites: CS 230 and either MATH 225 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Freire, Singh

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CS 232
Artificial Intelligence

What is artificial intelligence (AI) and should humans fear it as one of "our biggest existential threats"? In this course we will grapple with these difficult questions and investigate them in different ways. We will follow the history of AI from Alan Turing's "Can Machines Think?" seminal paper to the recent Elon Musk musings on AI's threat to mankind. We will discuss the underlying theory of the symbolic, knowledge-rich approaches of the 20th century AI (e.g., rule-based systems) and the 21st century approaches relying on statistical learning from large amounts of data (e.g., machine learning algorithms). Finally, we will dissect some of the AI applications in modern life: personal assistant technology like Alexa and Siri, machine translation (Google Translate), and self-autonomous cars. By the end of the semester, students should be able to answer the starting questions in depth and with nuance.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 230 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Mustafaraj

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

CS 234
Data, Analytics, and Visualization

As the number of our digital traces continues to grow, so does the opportunity for discovering meaningful patterns in these traces. In this course, students will initially learn how to collect, clean, format, and store data from digital platforms. By adopting a computational approach to statistical analysis, students will then implement in code different statistical metrics and simulation scenarios for hypothesis testing and estimation. Finally, students will generate meaningful visualizations for data exploration and communicating results. Additionally, we will discuss the ethics of data collection and think critically about current practices of experimenting with online users. Students will work in groups to create their own datasets, ask an interesting question, perform statistical analyses and visualizations, and report the results.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 230 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Mustafaraj

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CS 235
Theory of Computation

This course offers an introduction to the theory of computation. Topics include languages, regular expressions, finite automata, grammars, pushdown automata, and Turing machines. The first part of the course covers the Chomsky hierarchy of languages and their associated computational models. The second part of the course focuses on decidability issues and unsolvable problems. The final part of the course investigates complexity theory.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 24

Prerequisites: CS 230 and either MATH 225 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Singh, Tjaden

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CS 240
Foundations of Computer Systems with Laboratory

This course examines how computers run programs, introducing key software and hardware abstractions and implementations between programming languages and transistors. The course traces representation and translation of data and programs through three broad topics in computer systems: computer hardware implementation, including digital logic, computer arithmetic, and machine organization; the hardware-software interface, including instruction set architecture, assembly code, and the C programming language; and abstractions for practical systems, including the physical memory hierarchy, the operating system process model, virtual memory, and memory management. Students complete extensive hands-on projects in hardware and software systems. Students are required to attend one three-hour laboratory weekly.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 24

Prerequisites: One of CS 111, CS 112, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Davis, Wood

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: This course does satisfy the laboratory requirement.

CS 242
Computer Networks

A systems-oriented approach to data networks, including a theoretical discussion of common networking problems and an examination of modern networks and protocols. Topics include point-to-point links, packet switching, Internet protocols, end-to-end protocols, congestion control, and security. Projects may include client-server applications and network measurement tools.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 230 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CS 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: CS 230 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Normally mandatory credit/noncredit.

CS 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: CS 230 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Normally mandatory credit/noncredit.

CS 251
Theory of Programming Languages

This course introduces principles underlying the design, semantics, and implementation of modern programming languages in major paradigms including function-oriented, imperative, and object-oriented. The course examines: language dimensions including syntax, naming, state, data, control, types, abstraction, modularity, and extensibility; issues in the runtime representation and implementation of programming languages; and the expression and management of parallelism and concurrency. Students explore course topics via programming exercises in several languages, including the development of programming language interpreters.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 24

Prerequisites: CS 230 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Wood

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CS 301
Compiler and Runtime System Design

This course covers principle and practice in the design and implementation of modern compilers and programming language runtime systems. Topics include lexical analysis, parsing, symbols tables, semantic analysis, type checking, intermediate representations, program analysis and optimization, code generation, garbage collection, and other runtime support. As time permits, the course may also survey topics including just-in-time compilation, runtime optimization, concurrent runtime systems, or extended automatic program error detection. Students will construct a full compiler and runtime system for a simple statically-typed programming language over the course of the semester.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 230 and at least one of CS 240 or CS 251. CS 235 is recommended, but not required.

Instructor: Wood

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not offered in 2019-20. Normally offered in alternate years.

CS 304
Databases with Web Interfaces

A study of the three-layer architecture commonly used for Web-based applications such as e-commerce sites. We will learn to model and design databases using entity-relationship diagrams and the Standard Query Language (SQL) for managing databases. We will focus on Flask, a popular Python-based web micro-framework, as well as important alternatives such as PHP and Node.js. We will also discuss performance, reliability, and security issues. Finally, we will create dynamic websites driven by database entries.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 230 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Anderson

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

CS 305
Machine Learning

Machine learning is the science of teaching computers how to learn from observations. It is ubiquitous in our interactions with society, showing up in face recognition, web search, targeted advertising, speech processing, genetic analysis, and even Facebook's selection of posts to display. It is currently at the forefront of research in artificial intelligence, and has been making rapid strides given the vast availability of data today. This course is a broad introduction to the field, covering the theoretical ideas behind widely used algorithms like support vector machines, neural networks, graphical models, decision trees, and many more. We will also study practical applications of these algorithms to problems in vision, speech, language, biology, and the social sciences.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 230 and either MATH 206 or MATH 220 or MATH 225.

Instructor: Tjaden

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Grading is mandatory credit/noncredit.

CS 307
Computer Graphics

A survey of topics in computer graphics with an emphasis on fundamental techniques. Topics include: graphics hardware, fundamentals of three-dimensional graphics including modeling, projection, coordinate transformation, synthetic camera specification, color, lighting, shading, hidden surface removal, animation, and texture-mapping. We also cover the mathematical representation and programming specification of lines, planes, curves, and surfaces. Students will build graphics applications using a browser-based platform.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 230 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hildreth

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CS 310
Foundations of Cryptology

When is a cryptographic system secure and how will we ever know? This course introduces the computational models and theory computer scientists use to address these issues. Topics include one-way functions, trapdoor functions, probabilistic complexity classes, pseudorandom generators, interactive proof systems, zero-knowledge proofs, and the application of these theories to modern cryptology.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 231 or CS 235 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

CS 313
Computational Biology

Many elegant computational problems arise naturally in the modern study of molecular biology. This course is an introduction to the design, implementation, and analysis of algorithms with applications in genomics. Topics include bioinformatic algorithms for dynamic programming, tree-building, clustering, hidden Markov models, expectation maximization, Gibbs sampling, and stochastic context-free grammars. Topics will be studied in the context of analyzing DNA sequences and other sources of biological data. Applications include sequence alignment, gene-finding, structure prediction, motif and pattern searches, and phylogenetic inference. Course projects will involve significant computer programming in Java. No biology background is expected.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 230 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Tjaden

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

CS 315
Data and Text Mining for the Web

In the past decade, we have experienced the rise of socio-technical systems used by millions of people: Google, Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, etc. Such systems are on the one hand computational systems, using sophisticated infrastructure and algorithms to organize huge amount of data and text, but on the other hand social systems, because they cannot succeed without human participation. How are such systems built? What algorithms underlie their foundations? How does human behavior influence their operation and vice-versa? In this class, we will delve into answering these questions by means of: a) reading current research papers on the inner-workings of such systems; b) implementing algorithms that accomplish tasks such as web crawling, web search, random walks, learning to rank, text classification, topic modeling; and c) critically thinking about the unexamined embrace of techno-solutionism using a humanistic lens.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 230 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2019-2020.

CS 320
Tangible User Interfaces

Tangible user interfaces emerge as a novel human-computer interaction style that interlinks the physical and digital worlds. Extending beyond the limitations of the computer mouse, keyboard, and monitor, tangible user interfaces allow users to take advantage of their natural spatial skills while supporting collaborative work. Students will be introduced to conceptual frameworks, the latest research, and a variety of techniques for designing and building these interfaces. Developing tangible interfaces requires creativity as well as an interdisciplinary perspective. Hence, students will work in teams to design, prototype, and physically build tangible user interfaces.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 215, CS 220, or CS 230, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not offered in 2019-2020.

CS 321
Mixed and Augmented Reality

Mixed and Augmented Reality technologies combine virtual content with the physical environment, allowing people to interact with computers and digital content in exciting new ways. These emerging human-computer interaction paradigms have been applied to a variety of fields including medicine, education, design, entertainment, and play. This course introduces fundamental methods, principles, and tools for designing, programming, and testing mixed and augmented reality applications. Topics include the history of virtual and augmented reality, application domains, hardware for 3D input and display, tracking and registration, 3D perception, and societal implications. Students will work individually and in teams to develop novel virtual and augmented reality experiences.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 220 or CS 230.

Instructor: Tynes

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CS 323
Social Computing

Social Computing systems connect us to our closest friends, and globally to people all over the world. In recent decades, companies like Facebook, Snapchat, and even Amazon, have reshaped our social environments. All of these systems, at their core, are designed to facilitate interactions between people. What design decisions shape these systems? Students will learn the theoretical foundations of Social Computing drawn from the Social Sciences, and will learn software prototyping and design techniques to create new systems. This class will explore topics such as identity, anonymity, reputation, moderation, crowdsourcing, and social algorithms. Students will work in teams to design, prototype, and build social computing systems.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 220 or CS230.

Instructor: Catherine Delcourt

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

CS 332
Visual Processing by Computer and Biological Vision Systems

This course explores methods for deriving information about the three-dimensional world from visual images and using this information for tasks such as recognizing objects and events, navigating through a dynamic scene, and communicating between social agents. We use an interdisciplinary approach that combines computer science, psychology, and neuroscience, facilitating the design of effective computer vision systems while contributing to an understanding of human visual processing and how it is carried out in the brain. Topics include edge detection, stereo vision, motion analysis, the analysis of color, object and face recognition, activity recognition, visual attention and search, and image processing applications in medicine, security, information retrieval, and mobile robotics. The course uses vision software written in MATLAB.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: CS 112 or CS 230, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years. Not offered in 2019-20.

CS 341
Operating Systems

This course is designed to provide a solid foundation in the design and implementation of key concepts in existing operating systems. These concepts include process management, scheduling, multitasking, synchronization, deadlocks, memory management, file systems, and I/O operations. Throughout the course, the mechanism design aspects of these concepts will be discussed and assessed from the point of view of a programmer. Moreover, more modern operating systems will be explored, such as virtual operating systems.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 240 or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not offered in 2019-2020. Normally offered in alternate years.

CS 342
Computer Security and Privacy

An introduction to computer security and privacy. Topics will include privacy, threat modeling, software security, web tracking, web security, usable security, the design of secure and privacy preserving tools, authentication, anonymity, practical and theoretical aspects of cryptography, secure protocols, network security, social engineering, the relationship of the law to security and privacy, and the ethics of hacking. Emphasis will include hands-on experience and the ability to communicate security and privacy topics to laypeople as well as experts. Assignments will include exercises with security exploits and tools in a Linux environment; problem sets including exercises and proofs related to theoretical aspects of computer security; and opportunities to research, present, and lead discussions on security- and privacy-related topics. Students are required to attend an additional 70-minute discussion section each week.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 230 and CS 240 or permission of the instructor. Recommended - at least 2 of CS 242, CS 220, CS 204, and Math 225.

Instructor: Lerner

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CS 343
Distributed Computing

What is the “cloud”? What is a distributed system? This course is for students interested in understanding the fundamental concepts and algorithms underlying existing distributed systems. By the end of this course, students will have the basic knowledge needed to work with and build distributed systems, such as peer-to-peer systems and cloud computing systems. Topics include MapReduce, Spark, communication models, synchronization, distributed file systems, coordination algorithms, consensus algorithms, fault-tolerance, and security.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: CS 230 (required); CS 231 and CS 242 (recommended).

Instructor: Christine Bassem

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

CS 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Normally mandatory credit/noncredit

CS 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Normally mandatory credit/noncredit.

CS 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

CS 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: CS 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

EALC 221
Gateways to East Asia (in English)

What does it mean to live life to its fullest capacity--personally, socially and ethically? What does it mean to succeed? To fail? To love? To fight? To dream? In search of answers to these questions, we read the classic foundational texts of China, Japan, and Korea from Confucian and Taoist philosophy to romantic tales, harrowing diaries and exquisitely crafted haiku. Bringing our knowledge as a China and a Japan specialist to bear, we formulate critical perspectives on key works with the goal of understanding East Asian culture as a whole and as different regional expressions. Join us as we explore the complexities of East Asian identity while discovering something about the big questions we all confront today wherever--and whomever--we are.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: No prior background in the study of East Asia is required; all readings will be in English.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

EALC 225
Traditional Romances of East Asia (in English)

The course begins with a brief introduction to an eleventh-century novel from Japan, Murasaki Shikibu's The Tale of Genji. This work shows considerable awareness of Chinese culture, but the design is entirely original and the aesthetics typically Japanese. There is no influence at all between Genji and our next subject, Cao Xueqin's eighteenth-century masterpiece, Dream of the Red Chamber, also known as The Story of the Stone. However, the similarities point to shared East Asian traditions, and the contrasts can be traced to major differences in the aesthetics of China and Japan. For students who have already studied The Tale of Genjii or Dream of the Red Chamber, alternative reading will be assigned. Later on we will take up three other pieces, two from Korea and one from Vietnam. These two, as well, fit into a larger East Asian syndrome, but exhibit national characteristics at the same time.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to all students.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EALC 325
Traditional Romances of East Asia (in English)

The course begins with a brief introduction to an eleventh-century novel from Japan, Murasaki Shikibu's The Tale of Genji. This work shows considerable awareness of Chinese culture, but the design is entirely original and the aesthetics typically Japanese. There is no influence at all between Genji and our next subject, Cao Xueqin's eighteenth-century masterpiece, Dream of the Red Chamber, also known as The Story of the Stone. However, the similarities point to shared East Asian traditions, and the contrasts can be traced to major differences in the aesthetics of China and Japan. For students who have already studied The Tale of Genjii or Dream of the Red Chamber, alternative readings will be assigned. Later on we will take up three other pieces, two from Korea and one from Vietnam. These two, as well, fit into a larger East Asian syndrome, but exhibit national characteristics at the same time.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: One 200-level course in either Chinese or Japanese language and culture required.

Instructor: Widmer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EALC 345
Seminar: Language, Nationalism, and Identity in East Asia (In English)

Language constitutes an important marker of social identity at many levels, such as the individual, subcultures, ethnic groups, and nations. Language has contributed to establishing unity, socio-cultural diversity, and nationalism in East Asian Society. This course explores the function of language in forming national, ethnic, and cultural identity and nationalism throughout the modernization process for China, Korea, and Japan. The seminar will discuss how language has been interconnected with the shaping of intra-East Asian literary/cultural practices, modern identity, and globalization. Students will acquire fundamental knowledge of the dynamics of language and socio-cultural changes as well as comparative perspectives on nationalism/colonialism and national identity in East Asian communities. Basic knowledge of and familiarity with a particular language/region (China, Korea, or Japan) and its historical, socio-linguistic backgrounds are required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: One 200-level course in either Chinese, Japanese, or Korean language and culture required.

Instructor: Lee

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

EAS 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

EAS 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

EAS 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the director.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

EAS 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: EAS 360 and permission of the director.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ECON 101
Principles of Microeconomics

This first course in economics introduces students to the market system. Microeconomics considers the decisions of households and firms about what to consume and what to produce, and the efficiency and equity of market outcomes. Supply and demand analysis is developed and applied. Policy issues include price floors and ceilings, competition and monopoly, income distribution, and the role of government in a market economy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 33

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 102
Principles of Macroeconomics

This course follows ECON 101 and analyzes the aggregate dimensions of a market-based economy. Topics include the measurement of national income, economic growth, unemployment, inflation, business cycles, the balance of payments, and exchange rates. The impact of government monetary and fiscal policies is considered.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 35

Prerequisites: ECON 101. Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 103/ SOC 190
Introduction to Probability and Statistical Methods

An introduction to the collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of quantitative data as used to understand problems in economics and sociology. Using examples drawn from these fields, this course focuses on basic concepts in probability and statistics, such as measures of central tendency and dispersion, hypothesis testing, and parameter estimation. Data analysis exercises are drawn from both academic and everyday applications.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: SOC 190

Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102, or one course in sociology and fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken or are taking STAT 218 or PSYC 205 (or MATH 220 during or before Spring 2018.)

Instructor: Levine, McKnight, Swingle (Sociology)

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 201
Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

Intermediate microeconomic theory: analysis of the individual household, firm, industry, and market, and the social implications of resource allocation choices. Emphasis on application of theoretical methodology.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102 and one math course at the level of MATH 115 or higher. The math course must be taken at Wellesley.

Instructor: Park, Rothschild, Skeath

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 202
Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

Intermediate macroeconomic theory: analysis of fluctuations in aggregate income and growth and the balance of payments. Analysis of policies to control inflation and unemployment.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102 and one math course at the level of MATH 115 or higher. The math course must be taken at Wellesley.

Instructor: Hilt, Neumuller, Sichel

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

ECON 203
Econometrics

This course introduces students to the methods economists use to assess empirical relationships, primarily regression analysis. Issues examined include statistical significance, goodness-of-fit, dummy variables, and model assumptions. Includes an introduction to panel data models, instrumental variables, and randomized and natural experiments. Students learn to apply the concepts to data, read economic research, and write an empirical research paper. The credit/noncredit grading option is not available for this course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102, and one math course at the level of MATH 115 or higher. The math course must be taken at Wellesley. One course in statistics (ECON 103, PSYC 205, STAT 218 or MATH 220 prior to fall 2018 ) is also required.

Instructor: Park, Shastry

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 210
Financial Markets

Overview of financial markets and institutions, including stock and bond markets, money markets, derivatives, financial intermediaries, monetary policy, and international currency markets.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102, and ECON 103.

Instructor: Joyce

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 213
International Finance and Macroeconomic Policy

This course introduces the study of macroeconomics in an open economy. Topics include basic features of foreign exchange markets, the structure of the balance of payments accounts, and the effectiveness of macroeconomic policy under fixed and flexible exchange rates and varying degrees of capital mobility. The course also examines the evolution of the international financial system, the role of the IMF, the creation of the European Monetary Union, and the recent financial crises in East Asia, Russia, and Brazil.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 102.

Instructor: Weerapana

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 214
Trade Policy

An introduction to international trade in theory and practice. Emphasis on the application of microeconomic principles in international economics. Topics to be covered include the debate over free versus fair trade; trade and the welfare of workers in developed and developing nations; the use of tariffs, quotas, and other instruments of protection; trade deficits; and the costs and benefits of international migration.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102 are prerequisites and ECON 103 is encouraged.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 220
Development Economics

Survey and analysis of problems and circumstances of less-developed nations. Examination of theories of economic growth for poor nations. Review of policy options and prospects for low- and middle-income economies. Specific topics include: population growth, poverty and income distribution, foreign aid, and human resource strategies.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101, ECON 102, ECON 103 recommended.

Instructor: Abeberese

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 222/ PEAC 222
Games of Strategy

Should you sell your house at an auction where the highest bidder gets the house, but only pays the second-highest bid? Should the U.S. government institute a policy of never negotiating with terrorists? The effects of decisions in such situations often depend on how others react to them. This course introduces some basic concepts and insights from the theory of games that can be used to understand any situation in which strategic decisions are made. The course will emphasize applications rather than formal theory. Extensive use is made of in-class experiments, examples, and cases drawn from business, economics, politics, movies, and current events.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 21

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 222

Prerequisites: ECON 101. Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Skeath

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ECON 226/ EDUC 226
Economics of Education Policy

Applies microeconomic analysis to important questions in education policy. Should private school vouchers be implemented? What are the long-term benefits of early childhood education? Who goes to college, and who doesn't? The course uses conceptual insights from microeconomics to understand these and other questions; particular emphasis is placed on economic interpretation of case studies and contemporary policy debates.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 226

Prerequisites: ECON 101 required; ECON 103 or QR Overlay recommended.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 228/ ES 228
Environmental and Resource Economics

This course considers the economic aspects of resource and environmental issues. After examining the concepts of externalities, public goods, and common property resources, we will discuss how to measure the cost and benefits of environmental policy in order to estimate the socially optimal level of the environmental good. Applications of these tools will be made to air and water pollution, renewable and nonrenewable resources, and global climate. In addressing each of these problems we will compare various public policy responses such as regulation, marketable permits, and tax incentives.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 0

Crosslisted Courses: ES 228

Prerequisites: ECON 101

Instructor: Keskin

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 229
Women in the Economy

This course uses economic theory and empirical analysis to examine the lives of women and their role in the economy. We first discuss the economics of gender and note that the research on the economics of gender tends to fall into three areas: analyses of labor markets, analyses of policies and practices to address issues facing working women and their families, and analyses of the economic status of women across countries. After that introduction, we will discuss women's educational attainment and participation in the labor market, gender segregation and the gender pay gap, discrimination, division of labor within household, and work versus family-life balance. In the second segment we will review government and company policies, like affirmative action, aimed at issues faced by working women and families. The final section will examine international evidence on the economic status of women and their changing role in the world economy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101 and ECON 103, or by permission of instructor.

Instructor: Kerr

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 232
Health Economics

An economic analysis of the health care system and its players: government, insurers, health care providers, patients. Issues to be studied include demand for medical care, health insurance markets, cost controlling insurance plans (HMOs, PPOs, IPAs), government health care programs (Medicare and Medicaid), variations in medical practice, medical malpractice, competition versus regulation, and national health care reform.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101

Instructor: Coile

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 241/ LAST 241
Poverty and Inequality in Latin America

The course provides a survey of economic development in Latin America, emphasizing issues related to the reduction of poverty and inequality. The first part of the course explores the economic history of the region, including twentieth-century policies designed to promote growth and industrialization; the 1980s debt crisis; and subsequent episodes of economic reform and crisis. The second part of the course acquaints students with evaluations of education, health, and welfare policies that are designed to alleviate poverty and inequality in Latin America.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: LAST 241

Prerequisites: ECON 101

Instructor: McEwan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

ECON 243
The Political Economy of Gender, Race, and Class

An introduction to radical economic analysis of contemporary, globalizing capitalism, and of emergent alternatives. Analysis of the ways in which gender, race, and class are built into core capitalist economic values, practices, and institutions. Study of the economic transformation sought by the feminist, anti-racist, anti-class, and environmental movements, including the transformation of economic agency from competitive to more solidaristic and socially responsible forms. Investigation of alternative, more egalitarian, "solidarity economy" practices and institutions, such as simple living, socially responsible choice, fair trade, cooperatives, social entrepreneurship, and recuperated factories.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 101 or ECON 102 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBA

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBA

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/non credit.

ECON 251H
Wellesley Initiative for Scholars of Economics (WISE)

This course is designed to deepen students' engagement with scholarship in Economics. Enrollment is by invitation only and will draw from students concurrently enrolled in the core required courses for the major or minor. The class will introduce students to current research in Economics, presented by different faculty members, and link that research to skills and concepts covered in core required courses. Students will gain a better understanding of the ways the tools they are learning in their courses can be applied to real world issues.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Butcher, Rothschild, and Weerapana

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Mandatory credit/ no credit. The class meets once per week for 75 minutes. It earns 0.5 units and may be repeated once for credit. Enrollment is by invitation only. Invitations will seek to balance students by year of graduation.

ECON 301
Advanced Microeconomic Analysis

Further development and application of the tools of analysis developed in ECON 201 (Intermediate Micro). Students will study advanced topics in consumer and producer theory, particularly addressing the existence of risk, uncertainty, asymmetric information, and noncompetitive market structures. Other areas to be covered include general-equilibrium analysis, game theory, and prospect theory.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201. MATH 205 recommended.

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 302
Advanced Macroeconomics

In this course, students will learn about, and apply, mathematical techniques and econometric tools from doing macroeconomic analysis. In terms of mathematical preparation, students are expected to have a good knowledge of calculus and will be introduced to relevant topics in linear algebra, differential equations, and dynamic optimization. In terms of econometrics, students will learn about time-series econometrics and vector auto-regressions. Economic applications will include economic growth, search models of unemployment, New Keynesian models for macroeconomic policy evaluation, and dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, ECON 203, and MATH 205.

Instructor: Neumuller

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 303
Advanced Econometrics

This course will develop students' understanding of causal inference in cutting-edge empirical research. Students will develop tools for their own work and enhance their ability to critically evaluate research in the social sciences. How should a researcher approach an empirical question? How should a policymaker evaluate the impact of a program? Topics include randomized experiments, instrumental variables, panel data, and regression discontinuity designs. Applications will emphasize research on the frontier of applied microeconomics.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 203, MATH 205.

Instructor: Fetter

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 306
Economic Organizations in U.S. History

This course will use the insights of organization theory to analyze the development of the U.S. economy. The main topics to be examined will include: the evolution of the U.S. banking and financial system and the institutional changes underlying each phase of its development; the contractual foundations of business organizations and the choice between partnerships and the corporate form; the rise of big business and the great merger wave of the 1890s and the legal changes that made these developments possible; and the regulatory innovations of the Securities and Exchange Commission in the 1930s. The course will employ a variety of sophisticated theoretical and empirical methods in analyzing these developments and will present them in comparative international perspective.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Hilt

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 311
Economics of Immigration

This course examines the economic causes and consequences of international migration, both historically and in the present, with a focus on the U.S. experience. We explore changes in immigration law over time and the political debates surrounding immigration in the past and present. Topics include: the effect of immigrants on the wages of the native born; immigrants' use of welfare and other social services; and immigrants' involvement in crime and their treatment in the criminal justice system. In each case, students will discuss the popular perception, the theory, and the empirical evidence, with a focus on the public policy alternatives for dealing with each issue.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Butcher

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 312
Economics of Globalization

The process of globalization has aroused great controversy. This course examines the reasons for the integration across borders of the markets in goods and the factors of production, and the consequences of these trends. In the first part of the course we discuss the meanings, measurement, and history of globalization. We then investigate the rationale and record of international trade, the immigration of labor, and global financial flows. We examine issues related to international public goods, and the need for collective solutions to such global problems as pandemics and pollution. We also investigate the records of international governmental organizations.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201

Instructor: Joyce

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 313
International Macroeconomics

Theory and policy of macroeconomic adjustment in the open economy. Topics to be covered include models of exchange-rate determination, the choice between fixed and floating exchange rates, monetary union, policy effectiveness in open economies under different exchange rate regimes, and adjustment to balance-of-payments disequilibria.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 202 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Joyce

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 314
Advanced International Trade

This course analyzes the causes and consequences of international trade. The theory of international trade and the effects of trade policy tools are developed in both perfect and imperfect competition, with reference to the empirical evidence. This framework serves as context for the consideration of several important issues: the effect of trade on income inequality, the relationship between trade and the environment, the importance the World Trade Organization, strategic trade policy, the role of trade in developing countries, and the effects of free trade agreements.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 203

Instructor: Abeberese

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 318
Economic Analysis of Social Policy

This course uses economic analysis to evaluate important social policy issues in the United States, focusing on the role of government in shaping social policy and its impact on individuals. Does welfare make people work less or have more children? Why is the teenage birthrate so high, and how might it be lowered? How do fertility patterns respond to changes in abortion policy? Theoretical models and econometric evidence will be used to investigate these and other issues.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203

Instructor: Levine

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 320
Economic Development

This course examines what factors help to explain why some countries are rich and others poor and whether economic policies can affect these outcomes. We will study key aspects of life for poor households in the developing world, such as inequality, gender, and the intra-household division of resources; education; child labor; health; savings and credit; institutions; and globalization. Students will study recent research in the field and examine empirical evidence on these topics.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Shastry

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 322
Strategy and Information

How do individuals and groups make decisions? The core of the course is traditional game theory: the formal study of the choices and outcomes that emerge in multiperson strategic settings. Game theoretic concepts such as Nash equilibrium, rationalizability, backwards induction, sequential equilibrium, and common knowledge are motivated by and critiqued using applications drawn from education policy, macroeconomic policy, business strategy, terrorism risk mitigation, and good old-fashioned parlor games.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 103 or equivalent (MATH 220 or PSYC 205). MATH 205 recommended.

Instructor: Rothschild

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 323
Finance Theory and Applications

This course provides a rigorous treatment of financing and capital budgeting decisions within firms. Topics include: financial statement analysis; strategies and analytical methods for the evaluation of investment projects; capital structure and dividend policy decisions; risk, return, and the valuation of financial instruments; and management incentive structures. Risk management and the use of derivatives will also be considered.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Neumuller

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 324
Behavioral and Experimental Economics

Why do people give to charity? What can be done to convince more people to save money in retirement plans? This course explores these and other questions by introducing psychological phenomena into standard models of economics. Evidence from in-class experiments, real-world examples, and field and laboratory data is used to illustrate the ways in which actual behavior deviates from the classical assumptions of perfect rationality and narrow self-interest.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Shurchkov

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 326
Seminar: Advanced Economics of Education

This course applies modern econometric methods and evaluation design to the analysis of contemporary issues in education policy. Methods include randomized experiments, regression-discontinuity analysis, and the use of panel data. Issues include school accountability, private-school vouchers, and policies toward teacher labor markets. Students will conduct extensive empirical analysis of education data.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: McEwan, Patrick

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 327
The Economics of Law, Policy and Inequality

This course uses an economic framework to explore the persistence of inequality in the U.S. The course will pay special attention to racial inequality. We will use economic theory to analyze the rules governing important societal institutions, like the criminal justice system, to understand their theoretical implications for inequality. After examining the theory, we will closely examine the empirical evidence that tests for discrimination in criminal procedures, school finance, residential choices, media coverage, labor market outcomes, and more.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Park

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 328
Environmental Issues in Developing Countries

Poor sanitation, inadequate waste management, contaminated water supplies and exposure to indoor air pollution affect millions of people in developing countries and pose continuing risks to their health. The objective of this course is to provide students with a set of theoretical, econometric and practical skills to estimate the causal impact of environmental policies and programs with a particular focus on less-developed countries. Examples from the readings will explore the effect of laws, NGO programs or natural experiments on environmental quality and sustainability. Students will learn to critically analyze existing studies and to gauge how convincingly the research identifies a causal impact. Students will use these skills to develop an evaluation plan for a topic of their choice at the end of the term.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Keskin

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 332
Advanced Health Economics

This course applies microeconomics to issues in health, medical care, and health insurance. Emphasis is placed on policy-relevant empirical research. Topics include the impact of health insurance on health, the interaction between health insurance and the labor market, the government's role in health care, the economics of medical provider reimbursement, and the effects of medical malpractice policy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 203.

Instructor: McKnight

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 334
Domestic Macroeconomic Policy

You have heard the debates about macro policy:  Should the Federal Reserve raise or lower interest rates?  Is fiscal stimulus good or bad?  Has economic policy helped or hurt economic performance over the past decade?  This course builds on your tools from Intermediate Macro and Econometrics to deepen your understanding of the economics and empirical evidence that lie behind current macro policy debates in the United States.  A central goal is to develop the expertise needed to critically evaluate arguments on both sides of key issues and to assess the trade-offs implicit in policy decisions.  The course covers both fiscal and monetary policy, with the fiscal policy section including a simulation exercise that highlights the difficult challenges faced by policymakers.  Step beyond Econ 202 to develop a more sophisticated understanding of how macro policy really works. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 202 and ECON 203.

Instructor: Sichel

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ECON 335
Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Economic Journalism

Students will combine their knowledge of economics, including macro, micro, and econometrics, with their skills at exposition, in order to address current economic issues in a journalistic format. Students will conduct independent research to produce weekly articles. Assignments may include coverage of economic addresses, book reviews and recent journal articles. Students also will write an op-ed and a blog post. Class sessions will be organized as workshops devoted to critiquing the economic content of student work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202, and ECON 203.

Instructor: Sichel

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 341
Industrial Organization

This course uses applied microeconomic theory to study the relationships between firm conduct, market structure, and industry performance. Topics include monopoly power and imperfect competition, price discrimination, product differentiation, firm entry/exit, advertising, and standard setting. The course will introduce the possibility that free markets may not produce the socially optimal set of products. Emphasis will be divided equally between the strategic implications of the models and the policy implications.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ECON 343
Seminar: Feminist Economics

An exploration of the diverse field of feminist economics that critically analyzes both economic theory and economic life through the lens of gender and advocates various forms of feminist economic transformation. Areas of focus include: economic analysis of gender differences and inequality in the family and in the labor market; feminist critiques of current economic institutions and policies, and suggested alternatives; and feminist critiques of economic theory and methodology.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: ECON 201, ECON 202.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ECON 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ECON 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ECON 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ECON 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ECON 380
Economics Research Seminar

A seminar for senior economics majors engaged in independent research. Students will learn about the use of empirical techniques in economics, including the opportunity to engage with the research of prominent economists, who present their work at the Calderwood and Goldman seminars hosted by the department. Students will also present and discuss their own research at weekly meetings. Students may not accumulate more than 0.5 credit for this course.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Limited to senior Economics majors doing independent research.

Instructor: Hilt

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

EDUC 103Y/ WGST 102Y
First-Year Seminar: Lessons of Childhood: Representations of Difference in Children's Media

From Disney films to Nickelodeon cartoons to Newberry award-winning texts, popular children's media offers us the opportunity to analyze how complex issues of identity are represented in cultural productions aimed at a young audience. This course takes as a site of analysis media aimed at children to investigate the lessons imparted and ideologies circulate in popular films and books. How is class drawn in Lady and the Tramp? What are politics of language at play in Moana? What are the sounds of masculinity in Beauty and the Beast? How does Mulan construct gender, race, and militarism? Using an intersectional frame of analysis, we will trace popular tropes, identify images of resistance, and map out the more popular messages children receive about difference in our world.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 10 3Y

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Mata

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: No letter grade. Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course. Registration in this section is restricted to students selected for the Wellesley Plus Program.

EDUC 117Y
First-Year Seminar: Understanding Diversity and Promoting Equity in Schools

Despite popular notions of increasing diversity, schools today have become more segregated by race, class and ethnicity. In a society that values diversity and inclusion, how have educational practices fallen short? In this course, we will explore the ways K-12 and higher education settings have responded to diversity and promoted equity in schools. To examine these questions, we use research texts, narrative, storytelling and documentary film to integrate theoretical perspectives with the lived experiences of youth. Students will showcase their learning through original research presented through digital storytelling.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: None. Open to first-year students only.

Instructor: Hong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

EDUC 200
Theory and Practice in Early Childhood Care and Education

Starting with a broad, historical overview of child development and developmental theories, we will connect ideas about children's learning with teaching practices and current perspectives on early childhood education. We will focus on recognizing changing needs and developmental differences in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers as they grow in all skill areas-motor, cognitive, social emotional, and language and communication. Through readings, observations, writing assignments, and reflective discussion, students will learn to integrate developmental understanding and appropriate curriculum planning in an Early Childhood setting.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Morgan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Meets one of the course requirements toward Department of Education and Care Teacher Certification.

EDUC 201
Educating Young Children with Special Needs

We will study characteristics of young children with special needs and examine supportive programs, practices, and services. We will focus on theoretical and applied knowledge about special needs, including communication disorders, sensory impairments, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders, autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, giftedness, and physical and health related disabilities. We will discuss screening, assessment, early intervention, individualized education programs, inclusive education, community resources, family issues, and the requirements of various state and federal laws that impact children and students with disabilities. Students will learn about how programs make accommodations and modifications based on young children's needs.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Some coursework in child development or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Morgan

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

EDUC 212
History of American Education

We will study the role that education has played in American society and the evolution of support and expectations for public schools. We will examine how schools have served the needs of immigrants and students from different gender, racial, ethnic, linguistic, social class, and religious backgrounds. We will focus on the education of teachers, the organization of urban school systems, the growth of high schools and preschools, attempts to reform schools and the curriculum, and efforts to promote equal educational opportunity and social justice through education.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: TBA

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

EDUC 213
Social and Emotional Learning and Development: Theoretically informed Practice for K-12 education

This course engages students in a series of explorations that illuminate the field of social and emotional learning, which is fast becoming one of the most exciting areas of teaching and learning in U.S. schools. Students explore how social, emotional, and academic learning can be interwoven with what we understand about child and youth development, and how these ideas can inform the pedagogy and practices of caring in schools. Students also uncover how social and emotional learning is bound together with the struggle for civic participation and issues around structural oppression. Making use of a great variety of sources from articles to podcasts, novels, and films, students debate the critical role educators play in the development of emotional intelligence and resilience in K-12 students. Through their engagement with many different activities and learning structures, students make the connection between social-emotional skills and school climate, and explore the distinguishing features of positive cognitive, social, and emotional development at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Students debate historic and contemporary cases of evidence-based social-emotional practices and programs in a range of urban and suburban schools. Students also have multiple opportunities to explore their own social emotional educations and design their own initiatives to act on their learning.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Rubin

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 214
Reimagining Youth: Exploring the Role of Family, Community and Society

School-age children and youth are often understood through the complex lives they lead in schools--academic achievers, behavioral misfits, and rebellious adolescents. Beyond the routine analyses of behavior, test scores and curriculum, what else can the lives of youth tell us about educational change? This course seeks to explore education by looking outside of schools: What are the experiences of students’ families and how does family life shape definitions of success? How do relationships with peers influence motivation in school? How do historical, political, social and cultural contexts shape interactions with formal schooling? Through an exploration of research, memoir, children’s literature and film, this course seeks to understand children and youth through their complex relationships and encounters within families, peer groups and community institutions, all the while interrogating the ways schools can integrate the holistic lived experiences of children and youth into theories of educational change.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Hong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 215/ PEAC 215
Understanding and Improving Schools

In this course students will engage with a spectrum of historic and contemporary school reform efforts across different contexts in the United States. Making use of a diverse array of texts from articles to podcasts and videos, students will struggle with both the promise of education as a tool for remedying inequalities and the stubborn reality that too often schools reflect and reproduce injustice. The structure of the course session and activities prompts students to learn about and experience alternative educational possibilities. Working in groups, pairs, and as individuals, students will explore scholarship and cases in educational anthropology, sociology, history, and critical theory, while questioning the purposes, processes, and products of schooling. Central to the course is the community students create with the instructor for mutual learning support and debate. All members of the course are engaged in a learning stance that centers a discipline of hope and engages with the proposition that communities can organize their own struggle to define and demand a humanizing and liberatory education. Students also have multiple opportunities to explore their own educational experiences and design their own research or educational initiatives to act on their learning.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 215

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Vasudevan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

EDUC 216
Education and Social Policy

An examination of education policy in recent decades as well as the social, political, and economic forces that have shaped those policies over the years. We will analyze the different-and sometimes conflicting-goals, motivations, and outcomes of educational policies. Who designs educational policy and for whom? Whose interests are served and whose interests are unmet? Using an interdisciplinary approach and the exploration of local cases, we examine the ways education policies and practices have responded to or been shaped by social issues such as immigration, poverty, racism and urban development. We will integrate theoretical and conceptual learning with an understanding local cases and in doing so, students will develop critical skills of analysis that can allow them to understand current trends and policies and develop alternative solutions to questions of educational practice.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Vasudevan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

EDUC 217/ WGST 217
Growing Up in a Gendered World

This course focuses on childhood and the teen years in the United States. How is gender socially constructed in childhood and adolescence? What are the experiences of children and teens in families, schools, and peer groups that contribute to that process? What is the relationship between pop culture and the gendered lives of children and teens? How does gendering vary by race/ethnicity and social class? We will explore the core issues in the field, including the importance of including the voices of children and teens, the ways in which gender is constructed in social interactions, and the intersections of gender, sexuality and peer status.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 217

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Marshall

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

EDUC 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 5

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

EDUC 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 3

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

EDUC 300
Teaching and Curriculum in Middle School and High School

This seminar engages students with the work of curriculum development and teaching in middle and high school classrooms. We will focus especially on classrooms as learning environments and on teacher understanding of student academic development. Additional laboratory periods for teaching presentations and an accompanying field placement are required.  This course is designed for seniors in the Wellesley Secondary Teacher Education Program, and for others who do not plan to complete teacher training at Wellesley, but who want to teach after graduation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: One of EDUC 102, EDUC 117, EDUC 212, EDUC 215, EDUC 216, PSYC 248, PSYC 321, or MIT 11.124 or other approved course, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hawes

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Open to all students, mandatory for those seeking middle school or high school certification; students should contact the instructor either before or soon after registration to plan their field placement.

EDUC 302
Seminar: Critical Perspectives, Practice, and Reflection in Teaching and Curriculum

This small seminar engages students in the study and observation of teaching in all its dimensions, including the role of the teacher, the nuances of classroom interactions, and individual and group learning. Careful examination of curriculum materials and classroom practice in specific teaching fields in order to guide practice and to develop students’ diverse perspectives.  Students also learn about Teacher Action Research and the process of gathering data and acting to improve learning.  Students interested in working with middle or high school students should enroll in section 302-01; students interested in working with elementary or preschool students should enroll in section 302-02

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: EDUC 300 or EDUC 304 or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hawes, Rubin

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Open to students seeking substantial observation and teaching experience in a school, mandatory for students seeking teacher certification; students should contact the instructor either before or soon after registration to plan their field placement.

EDUC 303
Practicum: Curriculum and Supervised Teaching

This course is supervised student teaching, and curriculum development in students' teaching fields throughout the semester. Attendance at an appropriate school placement is required, with regular observations and conferencing. Students interested in working with middle or high school students should enroll in section 303-01; students interested in working with elementary or preschool students should enroll in section 303-02.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Students seeking teacher certification must apply to the department for admission to this course in the semester before it is taken; other students should contact the instructor either before or soon after registration to plan their field placement.

Instructor: Hawes, Rubin

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Open to students seeking substantial observation and teaching experience in a school, mandatory for students seeking teacher certification; students should contact the instructor either before or soon after registration to plan their field placement. Mandatory credit/noncredit.

EDUC 304
Curriculum and Instruction in Elementary Education

In this seminar taught by a team of experienced master teachers, students will engage with the work of curriculum development, planning instruction, and assessment in elementary school classrooms. Methods for science, writing, community building, understanding students, caring for traumatized children, and educational technology, are included. Additional laboratory periods for the presentations of lessons engage students in practice teaching and an accompanying field placement are required. This course is designed for seniors in the Wellesley Elementary Teacher Education Program and other juniors and seniors who do not plan to complete teacher training at Wellesley, but want to teach after graduation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: or Corequisite

Instructor: Friedman, Haskell, Reed, Rubin, Tutin

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Open to all Juniors and Seniors, mandatory only for seniors seeking elementary education certification through the Wellesley Elementary Program. It is recommended that students who take this course have at least one previous education course. Students should contact Professor Noah Rubin for registration permission and to plan a field placement.

EDUC 305
Curriculum, Instruction and Special Needs in Elementary Education

A seminar taught by a team of experienced master teachers. A continuation of EDUC 304, this course engages student in curriculum materials and instructional methods used in elementary school classrooms. Students will learn about strategies for behavior management, teaching children with disabilities and special needs, and working with parents and the community. Social Studies is also included and students explore teaching English Learners and culturally sustaining pedagogies at length. Museum education and learning with technology and maker spaces are also included. An accompanying field placement is required. This course is designed for seniors in the Wellesley Elementary Teacher Education Program and other juniors and seniors who do not plan to complete teacher training at Wellesley, but want to teach after graduation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: EDUC 304 or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Rubin, Tutin, Dalsheim, Friedman, Haskell, Reed and Finkelstein

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Open to all Juniors and Seniors, mandatory only for seniors seeking elementary education certification through the Wellesley Elementary Program. It is recommended that students who take this course have at least one previous education course. Students should contact Professor Noah Rubin for registration permission and to plan a field placement.

EDUC 308/ SOC 308
Children in Society

This seminar will focus upon children and youth as both objects and subjects within societies. Beginning with consideration of the social construction of childhood, the course will examine the images, ideas, and expectations that constitute childhoods in various historical and cultural contexts. We will also consider the roles of children as social actors who contribute to and construct social worlds of their own. Specific topics to be covered include the historical development of childhood as a distinct phase of life, children's peer cultures, children and work, children's use of public spaces, children's intersectional experiences of inequality, and the effects of consumer culture upon children. Considerable attention will be given to the dynamics of the social institutions most directly affecting childhood today: the family, education, and the state.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: EDUC 30 8

Prerequisites: One 100- or 200-level sociology course, or permission of instructor.

Instructor: Rutherford

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course

EDUC 310
Seminar: Child Literacy and the Teaching of Reading

Students will examine how children acquire reading, writing, listening, and oral language skills, and how this relates to cognition, with a focus on current research and practice in literacy development for elementary-age children. Oral language and reading processes, assessment using a variety of techniques, phonics, and comprehension strategies are addressed and lessons are constructed. Integrated throughout this learning is an exploration of culturally diverse and relevant children's literature. Teaching strategies that address the needs of a diverse population of learners, including at-risk students, English Language Learners, and students with special needs will be studied. A weekly 1.5-hour field placement experience at a nearby elementary school is required. This course is structured to support students pursuing elementary education certification, but is open to all students and also highly applicable to students considering teaching abroad or in urban schools. Offered during the spring semester and required for elementary teaching certification, it is strongly recommended that the course be completed before student teaching begins.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to students who have taken at least one education course or by permission of instructor.

Instructor: Tutin

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

EDUC 312
Seminar: History of Childhood and Child Policy

We will explore the construction and successive reconstructions of childhood as a concept in America and of the evolution of policies about children. We will examine the emerging and fading roles of the state in assuming responsibilities for child rearing, education, and child welfare. We will study the history of how institutions, social policies, experts, and advocates have attempted to shape the lives of children of differing genders, and economic, ethnic, racial, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds in the intersectional “space” of childhood. We will look at children's agency as they have resisted adult prescriptions and created their own cultures. Is the United States a "child friendly" country?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors. Open to sophomores who have taken at least one Education course.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

EDUC 314
Learning and Teaching Mathematics: Content, Cognition, and Pedagogy

Students in this course will strengthen their own understanding of the principles and concepts underlying fundamental mathematical content, specifically number and operations, functions and algebra, geometry and measurement, and statistics and probability. At the same time, students will learn to develop meaningful and inviting approaches to teaching mathematics classroom settings, with an emphasis on student-centered learning. This course is team taught by Wellesley College faculty with a background in mathematics and quantitative reasoning and an elementary school teacher and mathematics specialist. Weekly fieldwork of 90 minutes in an elementary classroom is required. This course is structured to support students pursuing elementary education certification, but is open to all students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: One education course or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Polito (Quantitative Reasoning), Haskell

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 320
Observation and Fieldwork

Observation and fieldwork in educational settings. This course may serve to complete the requirement of documented introductory field experiences of satisfactory quality and duration necessary for teacher certification. Arrangements may be made for observation and tutoring in various types of educational programs; at least one urban field experience is required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: EDUC 300 or EDUC 304. Open only to students who plan to student teach. Permission of the instructor required.

Instructor: Hawes, Rubin

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

EDUC 325
Seminar: Educating English Language Learners

Students will examine current research and practice in the teaching of English Language Learners, with a focus on secondary education. Students will explore challenges facing this diverse group of learners and how to build on the assets they bring to their classroom communities. Students will develop skills necessary to plan and promote discussion, engagement, and content mastery while supporting continued language development. Lesson planning will prioritize culturally relevant and responsive teaching while acquiring skills to analyze and adapt required teaching materials. Limited fieldwork is required; more extensive fieldwork can be arranged. The course is structured to support students pursuing middle school and high school teacher licensure and meets requirements for a MA Department of Education endorsement in Sheltered English Immersion when MA Secondary Education certification requirements are completed. It is applicable to students considering teaching abroad, in urban schools, or pursuing other work with English Language Learners.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to students who have taken at least one education course or by permission of instructor. Spring semester course taught at MIT.

Instructor: Tutin

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

EDUC 332
Seminar: Centering Community: Critical Perspectives on Youth Work & Out-of-School Time Programs

From early settlement houses and freedom schools to the creation of YMCAs, 4H clubs, and 21st Century Community Learning Centers, community-based out-of-school time programs and youth work have an important history in the United States and are part of the fabric of childhood and adolescent experiences. In this seminar, students will learn about the history, policy, theory, and practices that have shaped youth work and the out-of-school time field. Students will be introduced to the broader youth program landscape, engage in sociological literature on extracurricular impact and inequality, examine relevant educational and developmental theories, and wrestle with key sociopolitical and philosophical dilemmas that these contexts pose within our current educational policy context.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: One 200 level Education course.

Instructor: Deepa Vasudevan

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

EDUC 334
Seminar: Ethnography in Education: Race, Migration, and Borders

This seminar examines narratives of immigrant youth and families to understand ways in which race, culture, and migration shape educational experiences. Using ethnography as a methodological lens, we will develop in-depth analyses of research on immigration and education and design inquiry-based research projects that contribute to our understanding of the impact of immigration on education. We study the educational experience broadly, examining the role of schools, families and community institutions, and we highlight the multidimensionality of immigration through issues such as identity, place, language and culture. Instructor permission required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to EDUC majors or minors in junior or senior year or by permission of instructor.

Instructor: Hong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

EDUC 335
Seminar: Urban Education: Equity, Research and Action

This seminar explores urban schools through examination of research and practice. We study the experiences of students, families and educators shaped by the social, political and economic contexts of urban communities. Students investigate policies such as bilingual education and school discipline dynamically through an analysis of power, race, and agency. Voices of traditionally marginalized yet profoundly impacted communities frame course discussion of urban education. Through the implementation of an original field-based action research project, students study the interplay between research and practice. Fieldwork in an urban school or community non-profit arranged by the instructor and required for the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: EDUC 212, EDUC 213, EDUC 214, EDUC 215, or EDUC 216.

Instructor: Hong

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EDUC 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

EDUC 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

ENCW 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

ENCW 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 2

Max Enrollment: 10

ENG 106
Harry Potter's 19th Century

Harry Potter is among the most famous of present-day literary orphans. But in creating him, J. K. Rowling was drawing on a long literary tradition. Nineteenth-century British fiction is especially full of orphan characters, and the Harry Potter novels are rich in allusions to the literature of this period. In this course we'll read and discuss some of the greatest British novels of the nineteenth-century: Jane Austen's Mansfield Park, Charles Dickens's Oliver Twist, Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre, Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights, and George Eliot's Daniel Deronda or Silas Marner. We'll end with a discussion of Rowling's Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone, illuminated by a knowledge of the tradition in which she was writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Prerequisites: Not open to student who have taken this course as a topic of ENG 113.

Instructor: Meyer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 111D
Making Gloriana: Imagining Elizabeth I in Literature

Queen Elizabeth I (1533-1603) was an anomaly. Ascending to the throne of a country that for centuries had passed royal power from father to son, she was a woman who remained unmarried and childless. Her reign was long and successful, and her era produced a flowering of literary greatness, by Shakespeare and others, unparalleled in English culture. How did she conquer the political odds against her and create a personal mythology that inspired a generation of poets? This course will explore the world of Elizabeth I and the courtiers and artists who adored her. Special attention will be paid to treasures from Wellesley’s rare books and museum collections that illuminate the life and culture of Gloriana, the Virgin Queen.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites:

Instructor:

Notes:

ENG 112
Introduction to Shakespeare

A close study of six of Shakespeare’s greatest plays, chosen from a variety of genres and from throughout his career, with emphasis on both the poetic and dramatic character of their greatness.  Quizzes and assignments will stress the importance of an intimate acquaintance with the texts of the plays.  We will also watch recorded (or live, if possible) productions of each of the plays as a way of knowing them better appreciate more fully their theatrical power. Plays for Spring 2019 will be A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Henry IV, Part1, Twelfth Night, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra, and The Tempest.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Prerequisites: None. Especially designed for the non-major and thus not writing-intensive. It does not fulfill the Shakespeare requirement for English majors.

Instructor: Peltason

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 113
Studies in Fiction

A reading of some of the greatest novels of English, American, and European literature, primarily from the 19th century. We will move carefully together through these extraordinary works, seeking to make their deep acquaintance through attentive, shared reading and to add them to your own life storehouse of important literary experiences. Taught primarily in lecture, this course will not be writing-intensive. Designed especially for first-year students and for non-majors, though all others are welcome. A likely reading list: Jane Austen , Emma; Heinrich von Kleist, The Marquise of OAn Earthquake in Chile; Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary; Charles Dickens, Bleak House; Henry James, Washington Square; Leo Tolstoy, The Death of Ivan IlychMaster and Man, Hadji Murad.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Peltason

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 115
Great Works of Poetry

A study of the major poems and poets of the English language, from Anglo-Saxon riddles to the works of our contemporaries. How have poets found forms and language adequate to their desires to praise, to curse, to mourn, to seduce? How, on shifting historical and cultural grounds, have poems, over time, remained useful and necessary to human life? Approximately 1,000 years of poetry will be studied, but special attention will be brought in four cases: Shakespeare's Sonnets; John Milton's "Lycidas"; the odes of John Keats; the poems of Emily Dickinson. The course will conclude with a unit on contemporary poets (Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, Philip Larkin, John Ashbery and others).

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 60

Prerequisites: None. Especially recommended to non-majors.

Instructor: Bidart

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 120
Critical Interpretation

English 120 introduces students to a level of interpretative sophistication and techniques of analysis essential not just in literary study but in all courses that demand advanced engagement with language. In active discussions, sections perform detailed readings of poetry drawn from a range of historical periods, with the aim of developing an understanding of the richness and complexity of poetic language and of connections between form and content, text and cultural and historical context. The reading varies from section to section, but all sections involve learning to read closely and to write persuasively and elegantly. Required of English majors and minors.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Primarily designed for, and required of, English majors. Ordinarily taken in first or sophomore year.

Instructor: Chiasson, Rosenwald

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: ENG 120 is also taught as part of the First-Year Writing program. Two of these combined sections are offered each semester, and open to first-year students only. A course description can be found below as WRIT 105, and in the Writing Program curriculum.

ENG 121
A Survey of English Literature

Students in this course will gain a foundational knowledge of the major texts and developments of English literature from its inception. The course fulfills the 120 requirement for the English major and minor. Starting with Beowulf, we will survey the tradition’s most durably influential figures, including Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, Pope, Swift, Blake, Wordsworth, and Tennyson. We will also explore works more recently added to the canon, by Mary Wroth, Aphra Behn, Olaudah Equiano, and Mary Wollstonecraft. Along the way, we will reflect on theories of the canon and on what a literary period is (for instance, the Middle Ages, the Romantic Era), and how periodization continues to shape the study of literature. Like 120, this course emphasizes the close reading of significant texts, in class discussion and essay writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Not open to students who have taken ENG 216.

Instructor: Noggle

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: This course can substitute ENG 120 as a requirement to the major.

ENG 150Y
First-Year Seminar: Creating Memory

Participants in this seminar will delve into the workings of memory--a term that encompasses several different kinds of remembering and recollecting. What makes something memorable? Can we choose or shape what we remember? Does memory constitute identity? How has technology altered what and how we remember? As we ponder such questions, our primary focus will be on literature (including Shakespeare, Wordsworth, Emily Bronte, Christina Rossetti, Proust, Conan Doyle, Woolf, Borges, Nabokov, Morrison). We shall also draw on philosophy, psychology, and cognitive science and explore creative arts such as drawing, photography, painting, sculpture, book arts, film, and music. Students will write in several genres--creative, critical, and reflective-and experiment with different ways of collecting, curating, and presenting memories in media of their choice.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open only to first-year students.

Instructor: Hickey

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 202
Poetry

A workshop in the writing of short lyrics and the study of the art and craft of poetry. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Chiasson, Bidart

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit. Students who have taken this course once may register for it one additional time.

ENG 203
Short Narrative

A workshop in the writing of the short story; frequent class discussion of student writing, with some reference to established examples of the genre. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Holmes, Sides

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit. Students who have taken this course once may register for it one additional time.

ENG 205
Writing for Children

What makes for excellence in writing for children? When Margaret Wise Brown repeats the word "moon" in two subsequent pages-"Goodnight moon. Goodnight cow jumping over the moon"-is this effective or clunky? What makes rhyme and repetition funny and compelling in one picture book (such as Rosemary Wells's Noisy Nora) but vapid in another? How does E.B. White establish Fern's character in the opening chapter of Charlotte's Web? What makes Cynthia Kadohata's Kira-Kira a a novel for children rather than adults-or is it one? In this course, students will study many examples of children's literature from the point of view of writers and will write their own short children's fiction (picture book texts, middle-reader or young adult short stories) and share them in workshops. Enrollment is limited to 15 students.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Meyer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 206
Non-Fiction Writing

Topic for 2019-2020: Memoir

Topic for 2019-2020: Memoir

A workshop course on the study and practice of memoir, with the goal of making the autobiographical stories that matter to us, matter to our readers. We’ll focus on the essentials of memoir: generating and evaluating material, and developing voice, character, sensory details, structure, plot, conflict and tension, and scenes and dialogue. You’ll write two autobiographical stories, and then revise one. We’ll workshop each story as a class, and learn how to critique others’ work in order to better draft and revise our own work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to students who have fulfilled the First-Year Writing requirement.

Instructor: Holmes

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: ENG 206 is a changing topics writing workshop that will each year take up a particular nonfiction writing genre. Please note that this course is not intended as a substitute for the First-Year Writing requirement. The course can be taken more than once for credit as long as students register for a different topic. Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 210
History of the English Language

In 1774, an anonymous author wrote of the perfection, the beauty, the grandeur & sublimity to which Americans would advance the English language. In this course, we will explore the complex history that allows us to conclude that American English is not perfect and is but one English among many. We will study Old English, later medieval English, the early modern English of Shakespeare's day, and the varying Englishes of the modern British isles as well as those of modern America. We will read linguistic and literary histories along with literary passages from multiple times and places. We will ask, how does the history of the language affect our views of the world and our selves? And how are we continually shaping English's future?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Whitaker

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 213
Chaucer

Feministmisogynistheretic, moralist, progressive, reactionary—these are some of the conflicting labels that have been applied to Geoffrey Chaucer, enigmatic "father" of English poetry. More than ever, study today of the founder of the poetic tradition in English touches on the contested origins of our literary heritage--on issues of colonialism, gender, and racism--all of which have become lenses through which to regard Chaucer. This course will study Chaucer in his many incarnations, as courtly love poet, religious homilist, bawdy prankster, and advocate of English as the language of an emerging nation in the Canterbury Tales and selected supplementary texts by Chaucer and his contemporaries.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Lynch

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 221/ HIST 221
The Renaissance

This interdisciplinary survey of Europe between 1300 and 1600 focuses on aspects of politics, literature, philosophy, religion, economics, and the arts that have prompted scholars for the past seven hundred years to regard it as an age of cultural rebirth.  These include the revival of classical learning; new fashions in painting, sculpture, architecture, poetry, and prose; the politics of the Italian city-states and Europe’s “new monarchies”; religious reform; literacy and printing; the emerging public theater; new modes of representing selfhood; and the contentious history of Renaissance as a concept.  Authors include Petrarch, Vasari, Machiavelli, Erasmus, More, Castiglione, Rabelais, Montaigne, Sidney, Spenser, and Shakespeare.  Lectures and discussions will be enriched by guest speakers and visits to Wellesley’s art and rare book collections.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 221

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Grote and Wall-Randell (English)

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 222
Renaissance Literature

This changing-topics course encourages students and faculty to pursue special interests in the study of major writers and ideas during the Renaissance, the period of European history between the 14th and 17th centuries.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites:

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 223
Shakespeare Part I: The Elizabethan Period

The formative period of Shakespeare's genius: comedies such as A Midsummer Night's Dream and Twelfth Night; histories such as Henry IV (Part I); and tragedies such as Hamlet. We will undertake detailed study of Shakespeare's poetic language and will examine the dramatic form of the plays and the performance practices of Shakespeare's time. We will also explore important themes that inform the plays, from gender relations and identities to social class and nationhood. Viewing and analysis of contemporary performances and films will be integrated into the work of the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Peltason

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 224
Shakespeare Part II: The Jacobean Period

A close study of plays from the later half of Shakespeare’s career.  We’ll read six plays:  Measure for Measure, Othello, King Lear, Pericles, The Winter's Tale, and The Tempest.  The focus, first and last, will be on the close, careful, and responsive reading of these plays, working out together a sense of the meaningful and memorable experiences that they offer us.  At the same time, recognizing that these great plays were written originally as scripts for performance, we will seek to learn about and to re-imagine their life on the stage, exploring their historical context, watching filmed versions of the plays, and attending at least one live performance. Evaluations will include two essays, a midterm, and a final exam, and students will have the opportunity to undertake creative and performance projects.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Wall-Randell

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 227
Milton

Milton helped set the standard of literary power for generations of writers after him. His epic Paradise Lost exemplifies poetic inspiration, sublimity, creativity, originality, and unconventionality, offering a richness of meaning and emotion that seems to provoke violently incompatible interpretations, even radical uncertainty about whether his work is good or bad. This course will focus on how this poem challenges and expands our views of God, evil, heroism, Hell, good, Heaven, pain, bliss, sex, sin, and failure in startling ways. We will consider Milton as the prototype of a new kind of poet who pushes meaning to its limit, from his early writings, to Paradise Lost, to Paradise Regain'd at his career's end, and sample the range of critical responses his poetry has elicited.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Noggle

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 234
Dark Side of the Enlightenment

The period known as the Enlightenment (roughly 1660-1789) promoted individual rights, attacked superstition and advanced science, dramatically expanded literacy and publishing, brought women as readers and writers into a burgeoning literary marketplace, and created the public sphere. Yet the era also massively increased the trans-Atlantic slave trade, devised new forms of racism and anti-feminism, and established European colonialism as a world system. This course will examine British literature that confronts these complexities. We’ll read novels like Behn’s Oroonoko, Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, and Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels that portray encounters between Europeans and the non-European “Other”; poems by Alexander Pope and Mary Wortley Montagu that explore the nature of women and femininity; and texts that find the limits of Enlightenment reason in uncertainty, strong passions, and madness.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Noggle

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 241
Romantic Poetry

Essential works of a group of poets unsurpassed in poetic achievement and influence: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, and Keats. Selections from Dorothy Wordsworth and others. We'll explore and interrogate prominent themes of Romanticism, including imagination, memory; creation, childhood, nature, the self, concern for the marginalized and oppressed, sympathy, social critique, encounters with otherness, the lure of the unknown, inspiration as "spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings," dejection and writer's block, bipolar poetry, influence (from opium to "the viewless wings of Poesy"), beauty, truth, fancy, illusion; rebellion, revolution, transgression, exile, the Byronic hero, the femme fatale, the muse, complexity, ambiguity, mystery; mortality, immortality.  Open to majors and non-majors. no poetry background required. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Hickey

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 246
Victorian Poets, Pre-Raphaelites, Decadents, and the Turn of the Twentieth Century

The Victorian period, spanning roughly eight decades of literary tradition and innovation between Romanticism and Modernism, gave rise to some of the most memorable and best-loved works of literature in the English language: The texts for this course--mostly poems, some essays and short fiction, one play--include writings of Tennyson, Browning, Emily Brontë, the Rossettis and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Arnold, Hopkins, Wilde, Hardy, fin-de-siècle Aesthetes and Decadents, early Yeats, and World War I poet Wilfred Owen. They are evocative, emotionally powerful, idiosyncratic, psychologically loaded, intellectually engaged, sensual, daring, inspiring, harrowing, and bizarre. We'll trace thematic and stylistic connections, analyzing diverse representations of love, longing, loss, the power and limits of words, Medievalism, marriage and its discontents, gender dynamics, the Woman Question, women's authorship, queer eroticism, beauty, art, artifice, aesthetic and sensual pleasures, pain, suffering, sacrifice, the pity of war, repression, depravity, "madness," spiritual crisis, the horrors of war, and fears for the future of civilization. A Book Arts workshop and readings from Pater, Ruskin, Mill, Arnold, and William Morris will further illuminate the role of artists, artisans, and consumers of art.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Hickey

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 248
Poetics of the Body

Sensual and emotionally powerful, American poetry of the body explores living and knowing through physical, bodily experience. From Walt Whitman’s “I Sing the Body Electric” to contemporary spoken word performances, body poems move us through the strangeness and familiarity of embodiment, voicing the manifold discomforts, pains, pleasures, and ecstasies of living in and through bodies. We’ll trace a number of recurring themes: the relationship between body and mind, female embodiment, queer bodies, race, sexuality, disability, illness and medicine, mortality, appetite, and the poem itself as a body.  Poets include Whitman, Dickinson, H.D., T.S. Eliot, Elizabeth Bishop, Sylvia Plath, Frank O’Hara, Allen Ginsberg, Frank Bidart, Tracy K. Smith, Rita Dove, Thom Gunn, Ocean Vuong, Li-Young Lee, Max Ritvo, and Danez Smith.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Kathleen Brogan

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 249
Poetry Now

A study of American poetry in the last two years. Emphasis on poets with one or two books. Students will write short review-essays. Authors may include: Sally Wen Mao, Terrance Hayes, Danez Smith, jos charles, AE Stallings, Jenny Xie, Natalie Scenters-Zapico, Shane Macrae, J. Michael Martinez, and Jana Prikryl.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Chiasson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 251
Modern Poetry

“Make it new,” Ezra Pound's famous injunction to his contemporaries, captures the exciting, volatile, experimental energies of the modernist period. Poets today are heirs of the great poetic innovators of that time: W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, Pound, H.D (Hilda Doolittle), Marianne Moore, Wallace Stevens, William Carlos Williams, and Langston Hughes. We'll think about how their poetry responds to world war, new technologies, urbanization, shifts in gender roles, and breakthroughs in the visual arts. Toward the end of the semester, we'll take a look at poets of the next generation (Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, and Sylvia Plath), poets writing in the 1940s-1970s, to see how they respond to the modernist legacy they inherit.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Brogan

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 253
Contemporary American Poetry

A survey of the great poems and poets of the last 50 years, a period when serious poetry has often had to remind us it even exists. Our poets articulate the inside story of what being an American person feels like in an age of mounting visual spectacle, and in an environment where identities are suddenly, often thrillingly, sometimes distressingly, in question. Poets include: Robert Lowell, Elizabeth Bishop, the poets of “The New York School” (John Ashbery, Frank O'Hara, Barbara Guest, James Schuyler), Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, A.R. Ammons, Louise Glück, Robert Pinsky, Anne Carson, Susan Howe, Frank Bidart, Jorie Graham, D.A. Powell, Terrance Hayes, Tracy K. Smith, and others.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 45

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Bidart

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 254
The Poetry of Louise Glück

Louise Glück is undoubtedly a major poet-not only a great love poet, but a maker of books with enormous and unpredictable ambition. Each new book has been on the expanding frontier of aesthetic discovery. With the publication of her collected Poems 1962-2012, her poems can economically be seen as a whole. Poems 1962-2012 consists of 11 volumes; one volume will be studied each week. This will be supplemented by Faithful and Virtuous Night (her 2014 volume that won the National Book Award). After her first book she achieves, augments, and enlarges her mastery, book after book. The shifts in style and subject matter are never predictable but in retrospect seem inevitable.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Bidart

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit. Not open to students who have taken this course as a topic of ENG 355.

ENG 263/ PEAC 263
American Literature and Social Justice

A study of American fictions, plays, songs, essays, memoirs, and films dealing with questions of justice in the relations between races, ethnic groups, genders, and classes. General discussion of the relations between justice and literature, specific discussion of what particular works suggest about particular social questions. Possible authors and works: Rebecca Harding Davis, Life in the Iron Mills; Edward Bellamy, Looking Backward; Upton Sinclair,The Jungle; Marc Blitzstein, The Cradle Will Rock; John Steinbeck, Grapes of Wrath; poems about the Sacco and Vanzetti case; Lorraine Hansberry's Raisin in the Sun; poems by Langston Hughes, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Muriel Rukeyser, Robert Lowell, Adrienne Rich; memoirs by Jane Addams, Dorothy Day, James Baldwin, Martin Luther King, Barbara Deming, Ta-Nehisi Coates; accounts of the Japanese internment camps plays by the Teatro Campesino and Anna Deveare Smith; songs by Joe Hill, Billie Holiday, Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, Nina Simone, Janelle Monáe. Opportunity for both critical and creative work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 263

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Rosenwald

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 264/ PEAC 264
Antiwar Literature

A consideration of antiwar literature, in many of its forms - novels, plays, songs, cantatas, treatises, memoirs, poems, epics - and in many of the times and places in which it has been created, from the Bhagavad-Gita and Homer’s Iliad to Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried and whatever antiwar literature is being created now. Consideration also of more general issues: the definition of antiwar literature, the representation of antiwar activity, the nature of literature made by pacifists, the ethics of war and resistance to war, the nature of personal and collective responsibility in war, the critical controversies over whether explicitly antiwar literature can be of genuine literary excellence.

Units: 1

Crosslisted Courses: PEAC 264

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor: Rosenwald

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 271
The Rise of the Novel

Fantasy, romance, “true” crime, experimental absurdity, Gothic-early English fiction originates narrative types that energize the novel throughout its history as literature's most popular form. This course begins with Aphra Behn's New-World slave romance, Oroonoko, and Daniel Defoe's tale of a pickpocket and “whore,” Moll Flanders. Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift has captivated a world readership with its vertiginous mix of fantasy and satire. Henry Fielding laughs at his readers' class and gender anxieties in Joseph Andrews, while Horace Walpole invents a whole new fictional sensibility with the first Gothic novel, The Castle of Otranto. The course concludes with a parody of storytelling itself, Laurence Sterne's Tristram Shandy, and Frances Burney's Evelina, which anticipates the courtship comedy of Austen and the humorous characterization of Dickens.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 272
The Nineteenth-Century Novel

An exploration of the changing relationships of persons to social worlds in some of the great novels of the nineteenth century. The impact on the novel of industrialization, the debate about women's roles, the enfranchisement of the middle and the working classes, the effect on ordinary persons of life in the great cities, the commodification of culture-these and other themes will be traced in the works of some of the following: Charlotte Brontë, Emily Brontë, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Gissing, Thomas Hardy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Meyer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 273
The Modern British Novel

A consideration of the ways in which modernist writers reimagine the interests of the novel as they experiment with and reshape its traditional subjects and forms. From the frank exploration of sexuality in Lawrence, to the radical subordination of plot in Woolf, modernist writers reconceive our notion of the writer, of story, of the very content of what can be said. A selection of works by E.M. Forster, D.H. Lawrence, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Jean Rhys, and Joseph Conrad.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Rodensky

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 280
The Poetry of Frank Bidart

A course on the poetry of one of the key figures in American Literature of the past fifty years. Topics include: Bidart as a confessional and post-confessional writer, incorporating the innovations of his mentors, Robert Lowell and Elizabeth Bishop; Bidart as experimental poet, extending the high-Modernist line pioneered by Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams; Bidart as a practitioner of the dramatic monologue as channelled from Shakespeare to Robert Frost; as a regional poet of California and New England; as a poet of queer identity; and, crucially, as a poet of unsurpassed formal and rhetorical inventiveness. We will read Bidart's collected volume, Half-Light: Collected Poems 1965-2016, in its entirety.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Chiasson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 282
Topics in Literary Criticism

Topic for 2019-2020: Ghost Stories and How We Read Them.

Everyone loves ghost stories, but why? Do we believe in their truth? Do we see ghosts as something that people from other cultures or other times believe? Do we interpret the ghosts as symbols within the literary work? In this course, we will read stories featuring ghosts from across the world and through modern history. We’ll also explore various kinds of literary criticism to see how they can help us become more aware of what we’re doing when we read ghost stories. Stories and plays will include well-known works such as Hamlet, Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw, and Toni Morrison’s Beloved, as well as twentieth-century non-European fiction including the Nigerian writer Amos Tutuola’s The Palm-Wine Drinkard, and South Korean novelist Hwang Sok-Yong’s The Guest. We will read critics such as Elaine Freedgood and Kathleen Brogan, and explore theories about how people read, and how (or whether) literature is supposed to represent existing reality.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites:

Instructor: Yoon Sun Lee

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 286
New Literatures: The Gay 1990s and Beyond

Given their slow integration into the social mainstream, queer people have often made do with self-fashioning, a sensibility that identity is a work in progress. Literature and other artistic forms have been integral in sustaining and protecting the stories of queer lives and times. In this course, we will encounter various forms and transformations of queer expression, while focusing on a recent era that saw the dramatic visibility of LGBT folk: the 1990s. But we will not read this period in history in isolation. Instead, we will look backward too, considering early accounts of same-sex longing alongside contemporary representations. The Nineties zeitgeist was self-conscious about the previous “Gay Nineties” (the 1890s) and other queer eras like the Harlem Renaissance.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Gonzalez

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 289
London in Literature, Then and Now

London started to become a global, multicultural city in the eighteenth century. How has it changed and how has it remained the same? This course examines how London has been experienced and represented in literary works from the eighteenth to the twenty-first century. We will explore how the city has been imagined in terms of disease, crime, power and pleasure. We will consider what types of stories London inspires, and who gets to tells them?. Authors will include Charles Dickens, Arthur Conan Doyle, Virginia Woolf, and Zadie Smith.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Lee

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 291
What Is Racial Difference?

Through literary and interdisciplinary methods, this course examines the nature of race. While current debates about race often assume it to be an exclusively modern problem, this course uses classical, medieval, early modern, and modern materials to investigate the long history of race and the means by which thinkers have categorized groups of people and investigated the differences between them through the ages. The course examines the development of race through discourses of linguistic, physical, geographic, and religious difference--from the Tower of Babel to Aristotle, from the Crusades to nineteenth-century racial taxonomies, from Chaucer to Toni Morrison. Considering the roles physical appearance has played in each of these arenas, we will thoughtfully consider the question: What Is Racial Difference? Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Whitaker

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 294
Writing AIDS, 1981-Present

AIDS changed how we live our lives, and this course looks at writings tracing the complex, sweeping ramifications of the biggest sexual-health crisis in world history. This course looks at diverse depictions and genres of H.I.V./AIDS writing, including Pulitzer Prize-winning plays like Angels In America and bestselling popular-science "contagion narratives" like And the Band Played On; independent films like Greg Araki's The Living End and Oscar-winning features and documentaries like Philadelphia, Precious, and How to Survive a Plague. We will read about past controversies and ongoing developments in AIDS history and historiography. These include unyielding stigma and bio-political indifference, met with activism, service, and advocacy; transforming biomedical research to increase access to better treatments, revolutionizing AIDS from death sentence to chronic condition; proliferating "moral panics" about public sex, "barebacking," and "PrEP" (pre-exposure prevention), invoking problematic constructs like "Patient Zero," "being on the Down Low," "party and play" subculture, and the "Truvada whore"; and constructing a global bio-political apparatus ("AIDS Inc.") to control and protect populations. We will look at journal articles, scholarly and popular-science books (excerpts), as well as literary and cinematic texts. Also some archival materials from ACT UP Boston, the activist group.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Gonzalez

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 301
Advanced Writing/Fiction

A workshop in the techniques of fiction writing together with practice in critical evaluation of student work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ENG 203 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Cezair-Thompson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Students who have taken this course once may register for it one additional time. Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 302
Advanced Writing/Poetry

A workshop in intensive practice in the writing of poetry. Students who have taken this course once may register for it one additional time.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ENG 202 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Bidart

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 315
Advanced Studies in Medieval Literature

This changing-topics course provides opportunity to pursue special interests in the study of medieval literature.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 316
Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Dead Poetry Society

This Calderwood seminar in public writing will show that there is no such thing as dead poetry. In a series of weekly writing and editing exercises ranging from movie reviews to op-eds, we will explore the many ways that the great poetry of centuries past speaks directly to modern experience. We will be taught both by the poets themselves (whose eloquence will rub off on us) and each other, as each student will pick a poet whose writing she will become expert at relaying to a lay audience. By the end of the semester, not only will you be able to persuade a newspaper reader that blank verse matters as much as Twitter; you will also learn how to articulate the value of your English major to a prospective employer--and how to transmit your excitement about the latest discoveries in your field to friends and parents.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken at least two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Lynch

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 320
Literary Cross Currents

Topic for 2019-2020: Happiness

How does literature help us understand what it means to be happy? What kinds of happiness do the “happy endings” of novels, plays, and some poems propose (and why is happiness associated with endings, not middles or beginnings)? In this seminar, we’ll survey the diversity of ways literature has presented happiness. Sometimes it’s a feeling, either vividly immediate (joy, pleasure, elation) or longer term (contentment, fulfillment); at others it’s an objective condition: prosperity, flourishing. We’ll start with some ancient Greek-Roman philosophy, then focus on novels and poetry of the Enlightenment, when the pursuit of happiness (with life and liberty) became a political imperative. We’ll conclude with some modern texts that consider how happiness may thrive and fail under current class, family, labor, and other social conditions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: James Noggle

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 324
Advanced Studies in Shakespeare

Topic for 2019-20: Shakespeare and Company.

This course will consider Shakespeare's plays in the context of other important playwrights of the time, writers who influenced Shakespeare and whom Shakespeare influenced. Sometimes the similarities between Shakespeare and his contemporaries will illustrate important historical and cultural contexts for the Renaissance theater; at other times differences will point up Shakespeare’s particular style and approach. In addition to plays by Shakespeare, students will read Marlowe, Middleton, Heywood, Massinger, Elizabeth Cary, and Margaret Cavendish. A field trip to at least one live performance will be included.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Sarah Wall-Randell

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 325
Advanced Studies in 16th- and 17th-Century Literature

This changing-topics course provides opportunity to pursue special interests in the study of major writers and ideas in 16th and 17th century literature.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 341
Sisters, Brothers, and Lovers: Sibling Relationships in Romantic Literature

How do siblings, sibling relationships, and conceptions of brotherhood and sisterhood figure in Romantic-period authorship and texts? What is particularly Romantic about sisters and brothers? We'll consider such questions from several different angles, looking, for example, at the following: representations of siblings in literary texts; sister-brother writers (but also the importance of non-writing siblings); the relation of genius to genes; the complications of step-siblings, half-siblings, and siblings-in-law; the overlap or conflict of sibling relationships with friendship, marriage, romantic love, and self-love; and brotherhood as metaphor (revolutionary, abolitionist, Christian). Texts: poems, and some prose, by William and Dorothy Wordsworth, Coleridge, Charles and Mary Lamb, DeQuincey, Byron, Austen (Sense and Sensibility), M. Shelley (Frankenstein), P. Shelley, Keats.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Hickey

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 345
Advanced Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature

Topic for 2019-2020: Keats and Shelley

Topic for 2019-2020: Keats and Shelley

Intensive study of two great Romantic poets, John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley. 2019 is the bicentennial of their annus mirabilis—the astonishingly prolific “Year of Wonders” in which they composed their principal works, including Keats's Eve of St. Agnes, La Belle Dame Sans Merci, the famous odes (Psyche, Melancholy, Nightingale, Grecian Urn, Autumn), Hyperion, The Fall of Hyperion, and Lamia; and Shelley's Prometheus Unbound, Ode tothe West Wind, To a Skylark, The Cloud, and other personal and political odes and “songs of liberty.” We'll study each poet's works in depth, placing special emphasis on the wonders of 1819, the extraordinary poems that immortalized their creators and earned the Romantic Period its reputation as a time of unsurpassed fertility and influence for lyric poetry. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Hickey

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 346
George Eliot and Her Readers

In August 1872, Benjamin Jowett (the head of Oxford's Balliol College and one of the century's most eminent scholars) wrote George Eliot a fan letter. In it, Jowett not only identified Middlemarch, the novel Eliot published earlier that year, as her “great work,” but also reported that “It is a bond of conversation and friendship everywhere.” And so it has been ever since. In this course, we will explore the great novels of the greatest novelist of the Victorian period. In addition to reading Eliot's novels, we will take up critical responses to them, beginning with those of Eliot's contemporaries. In particular, we will consider readers' objections to her representations of religion, female autonomy, and sexuality. As we ourselves become part of Eliot's readership, we will think about her development as a novelist and critic who reimagined the novel as central to the moral and intellectual lives of the reading public. Eliot wanted her novels to make a deep and lasting impression on her readers, as indeed they do. Novels will include Scenes of Clerical Life, Adam Bede, The Mill on the Floss, The Lifted Veil, Middlemarch, and Daniel Deronda.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students. Not open to students who have taken this class as a topic of ENG 345.

Instructor: Rodensky

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 347
Nineteenth-Century Novels of Romantic Mistake

“Reader, I married him,” Jane Eyre tells us as her novel draws to a close. Many nineteenth-century novels end with a marriage. So despite suggestions within the body of the novel that women's traditional role is not a satisfying one, the heroine often seems contented in that role by the novel's end. But what happens if the heroine chooses wrongly? In this course, we will consider novels that look at a heroine's life after a marriage that she comes to regret, as well as some novels in which the bad romantic choices do not result in marriage. What do these novels of romantic mistake have to say about women's lives? Probable authors: Anne Brontë, Charlotte Brontë, James, Austen, Eliot.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken at least two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Meyer

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 348
Seminar: Jane Austen and Anthony Trollope

A reading of three great novels by Jane Austen (1775-1817), in company with three novels by the greatest of her Victorian heirs, the lesser known, but wonderfully readable, Anthony Trollope (1815-1882).  Each of these writers is a great comic novelist—comic not just in the sense that they make us laugh (though they often do), but that their chosen form is the novel of disrupted and then re-achieved social harmony, a harmony that is symbolized and effected by the marriage of two central figures. And each of them, though in significantly different ways, takes the form of the romantic comic novel and turns it to increasingly deep moral, social, and psychological purposes. We will read Pride and Prejudice, Emma, and Persuasion because those are the three of Austen’s novels in which the marriage plot functions most straightforwardly and satisfactorily as the vehicle of a larger vision of achieved social order—achieved in the midst of social and individual stupidities and obstructions of all kinds. From Trollope’s long and productive career, we will read The Warden, Barchester Towers, and The Last Chronicle of Barset, which are the first, second, and sixth novels of a larger series, The Chronicles of Barsetshire.  The first two novels, written early in Trollope’s career, show his rapid progress as a writer of what feel like village comedies, novels in which a small community must work its way forward through a series of disruptions to the provisional resolutions that can be achieved at least partially by the making of a happy marriage.  In The Last Chronicle of Barset, Trollope, at the height of his powers, writes a novel in which some marriages are successfully made, according to the prescriptions of the genre, but in which others are studied in a variety of modes of sober celebration, comic acceptance, pained regret.  The novel ends with marriage and with death, and with a dawning realization that the social forms and beliefs that make romantic comedy and social order possible are not divinely ordained but the products of a challengeable consensus.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken at least two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Peltason

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

ENG 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ENG 351
The Robert Garis Seminar

An advanced, intensive writing workshop, open to six students, named for a late Wellesley professor who valued good writing. This is a class in writing non-fiction prose, the kind that might someday land a writer in The New Yorker or The Atlantic. Our genre is often called "literary journalism," and here the special skills -- technical precision, ability for physical description, and psychological insight -- necessary for writing fiction are applied to real-life events and personalities. We will read and emulate authors like Joan Didion, Hilton Als, Ian Frazier, John McPhee, and Joseph Mitchell, and each student will produce a 5,000 word-piece of her own.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 6

Prerequisites: Open to qualified students by permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENG 354
James Joyce, Ulysses

Close reading of Ulysses, after preliminary engagement with Dubliners and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Aided by supplementary biographical and critical readings, attention will be paid to the complex effects of Joyce's Irishness on his relation to modern English literature and language.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENG 355
Advanced Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature

Topic for 2019-2020: Sapphic Modernism

This seminar focuses on the rich and strange archive of modern lesbian literature of the twentieth century. We begin with the “mother” of Sapphic Modernism, Sappho herself, and continue through the Interwar Era with the High Modernism of Virginia Woolf, the Black Modernism of Nella Larsen, the Parisian “Lost Generation” of Gertrude Stein, and the Late Modernism of Djuna Barnes. After an interlude during the Second World War, with the poetry of H.D. (Hilda Doolittle), we turn to the 1950s and the beginning of the so-called American Century, with the postwar pulp and noir writings of Ann Bannon and Patricia Highsmith. We continue into the 1960s, with the “toward Stonewall” lesbian novel Desert of the Heart by Jane Rule, and end with Adrienne Rich in the post–“Stonewall” Era.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Octavio Gonzalez

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 356
Ernest Hemingway: Life and Writings

This course will survey Hemingway's literary career: his novels, including The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, and The Old Man and the Sea; his journalism; and his brilliant short stories from In Our Time and other collections. We will give special attention to the young Hemingway, who survived serious wounds in World War I and who worked hard to establish himself as a writer in the 1920s when he was living in Paris with his wife and child-a period that Hemingway evocatively recalls in his memoir, A Moveable Feast. Our goals will be to understand his extraordinary style-its complexity, emotional power, and depth-and his charismatic personality as it is displayed in both his life and his writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Cain

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 357
The World of Emily Dickinson

The poems and letters of Emily Dickinson, arguably the most important American poet of the nineteenth century, provide a window into one of the most thrilling and idiosyncratic minds in literature. Dickinson lived her entire adult life in her family's elegant home on the main street of Amherst, Massachusetts, writing in her spacious bedroom through the night. The house and its views, as well as its gardens and paths, are all vivid presences in her work. Dickinson hand-wrote all of her poems on paper she scavenged around the house; scholars are still debating how to read and interpret her hand-done poems. To study Dickinson is to be confronted with questions that seem sometimes more forensic than literary critical. We will explore Dickinson's online archives and visit, several times, her house and gardens in Amherst. This course should appeal not only to lovers of poetry but to lovers of old houses, scrapbooks, ghost stories, and the material history of the New England region.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Chiasson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ENG 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ENG 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ENG 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ENG 381
Literature, Truth, and Reality

Why do we distinguish between fiction and non-fiction? Should literature reflect reality, criticize it, or imagine it otherwise? Do its representations shape our experiences in helpful or misleading ways? This course will examine how different theorists have condemned literature, tried to defend it, or explained its relation to reality. We will read a wide range of critics ranging from Plato and Aristotle to important twentieth-century theorists including Auerbach, Adorno, Foucault, and Jacques Rancière.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Lee

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

ENG 382
Literary Theory

A survey of major developments in literary theory and criticism. Discussion will focus on important perspectives-including structuralism, post-structuralism, Marxism, and feminism-and crucial individual theorists-including Bakhtin, Empson, Barthes, Derrida, Foucault, Jameson, Sedgwick, and Zizek.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Open to juniors and seniors who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Lee

Distribution Requirements: EC - Epistemology and Cognition; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 387
Authors

Topic for 2019-20: Virginia Woolf - From Victorian to Modern

Topic for 2019-20: Virginia Woolf - From Victorian to Modern

In this course, we will begin by examining Virginia Woolf’s development as a writer (her early essays, reviews, short stories and novels, particularly The Voyage Out) and then turn our attention to her two greatest works -- Mrs. Dalloway and To the Lighthouse. We will consider how Woolf reinvents herself as a modernist. We will also read excerpts from her diaries and other autobiographical works.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Open to all students who have taken two literature courses in the department, at least one of which must be 200 level, or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Rodensky

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Public Speaking Intensive Course

ENG 388
Trauma, Conflict, and Narrative: Tales of Africa and the African Diaspora

This course explores the role of narratives in response to mass trauma, focusing on regions of Africa and African Diaspora societies. Drawing on the emerging fields of trauma narrative and conflict resolution, we will examine the effectiveness of oral, written, and cinematic narratives in overcoming legacies of suffering and building peace. Topics include: violence in colonial and postcolonial Central Africa, the Biafran war, South Africa during and after Apartheid, and Rwanda’s 1994 genocide. We will also explore the trans-Atlantic slave trade and its impact on African American and Caribbean societies. Types of narrative include novels, memoirs, films, plays, and data from truth and reconciliation commissions. Students will be exposed to trauma narrative not only as text but as a social and political instrument for post-conflict reconstruction. Fulfills the Diversity of Literatures in English requirement.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Crosslisted Courses: ENG 388

Prerequisites: At least one literature course in any department or by permission of the instructor to other qualified students.

Instructor: Cezair-Thompson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ENG 390
Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: The New York Review of Books at Fifty

This is a course on the art of the book review. The course is tied to the fiftieth anniversary, in 2013, of The New York Review of Books. We will study The New York Review and what has been written about its history; we will read in the digital archive of the Review and write our own reviews in its prevailing moods and styles. This remarkable periodical has been at the center of intellectual life in America over the past 50 years; in seeing what made, and makes, it “tick,” we will discover the changing nature and function of great reviewing in a changing America.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: By permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Chiasson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ENGR 111
Product Creation for All

This hands-on class will explore how products are created, including an exploration of ideation and brainstorming, reverse engineering, and the product development process. An emphasis will be placed on the role of human factors engineering, including usability successes and failures of specific products. Students will learn about these topics through two approaches: disassembly and study of existing products and creation of simple product prototypes for specific, local nonprofit organizations serving populations such as those with developmental or physical limitations. By the end of the semester, students will be able to comprehend and independently apply both the product development process and specific human factors engineering approaches used in the design of many everyday objects; they will also have developed their own creativity and better understand how to further develop and apply that skill.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Instructor: Banzaert

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/no credit.

ENGR 120
Making a Difference through Engineering

A project-based exploration of the technical challenges facing underserved communities in developing countries. Technologies are focused primarily at the household level, exploring the benefits and limitations of existing and proposed solutions. Students will learn and apply engineering design skills-including estimation, prototyping, and creativity-to address real problems facing community partners affiliated with the class. Methodologies for participatory development and co-creation will be considered and utilized as appropriate. The necessity for interdisciplinary work when generating solutions will be emphasized.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Instructor: Banzaert

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ENGR 125
Making a Difference through Engineering Fieldwork

Fieldwork experience over Wintersession for students to experience first-hand the role of technology — at a household and national level — in a developing country. Students will learn about the technologies used in this location and come to understand both successful and unsuccessful attempts to adopt certain technologies developed locally and delivered by outsiders, applying frameworks of international development. When applicable, they will deliver projects developed in ENGR 120, assess these and previously delivered projects, and identify new projects. Development and practice of skills needed for engineering fieldwork will occur: interview methods, cross-cultural observation, creative capacity building, rapid design iteration, device building with limited supplies, and co-creation.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 6

Prerequisites: By written application. Preference will be given to students who have some level of relevant language fluency (typically Spanish and/or Portuguese) and/or have taken a previous, related engineering course.

Instructor: Banzaert

Typical Periods Offered: Winter

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Winter

Notes: Not offered every year. Subject to Provost's Office approval.

ENGR 160
Fundamentals of Engineering

Engineering is about combining ideas from mathematics, physics, computer science, and many other fields to design objects and systems that serve human needs. This project-based course introduces the big ideas of engineering and prepares students for taking additional engineering courses at Olin College or MIT. Topics include: the design and construction of mechanisms using rapid prototyping tools such as laser cutters, 3D printers, and computer-aided design software (SolidWorks); modeling and controlling physical systems using the MATLAB programming environments; and feedback and control using digital electronics (Arduino microcontrollers).

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: PHYS 107 or the equivalent, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Banzaert

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

ENGR 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

ENGR 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

ENGR 305/ PEAC 305
Intersections of Technology, Social Justice, and Conflict

This course explores the intersections between social justice, conflict, and engineering using an interdisciplinary, hands-on, case study approach. We will explore four technologies (drones, cell phones, cookstoves and water pumps), exploring in each case both the embodied engineering concepts and the ethical and political implications of using the technology. The case studies will inform our discussions of the following big ideas: technology is directly linked to social justice and can have both highly beneficial and? highly problematic results for the development and transformation of conflicts; understanding technology at a deeper level is critical to understanding the justice impact on communities and people; media communication about technology and technological innovations' benefits can be hyperbolic and requires a critical lens. Peace and Justice Studies majors must register for PEAC 305. Students in other majors may register for either PEAC 305 or ENGR 305 depending on their preparation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: ENGR 30 5

Prerequisites: one ENGR course, or a comparable course at another institution, or permission of the instructor (Banzaert).

Instructor: Confortini, Banzaert

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ES 100
Introduction to Environmental Science & Systems

This course introduces environmental science through the lens of systems thinking. Given the staggering level of complexity found around us, a powerful approach in science is to simplify complex systems into key components that influence processes and provide predictive power. But how do we choose which factors to focus on? How disconnected are causes and effects? Although not a laboratory course, students will actively engage in data collection, analysis, and interpretation of systems ranging from energy in ecosystems to environmental toxins and human health. (Note that students may enroll in either ES 100 or 101, but not both.)

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 36

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Griffith

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ES 101
Fundamentals of Environmental Science with Laboratory

Environmental problems are some of the most complex issues that we face today, and addressing them requires skills and knowledge from a variety of scientific and non-scientific disciplines. This course seeks to provide the scientific foundation for approaching environmental problems. Using a systems-approach to problem formulation and solving, we will investigate environmental issues including soil degradation, human and natural energy flows, stratospheric ozone depletion, mercury pollution, and the conservation of biodiversity. The combined studio and laboratory format offers diverse approaches for understanding, applying, and constructing models to investigate the behavior of environmental systems as well as testing hypotheses and drawing conclusions.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Open to first-years and sophomores. Juniors and seniors may only enroll with permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not open to students who have taken ES 100.

ES 101Y
First-Year Seminar: Fundamentals of Environmental Science with Laboratory

Environmental problems are some of the most complex issues that we face today, and addressing them requires skills and knowledge from a variety of scientific and non-scientific disciplines. This course seeks to provide the scientific foundation for approaching environmental problems. Using a systems-approach to problem formulation and solving, we will investigate environmental issues including soil degradation, human and natural energy flows, stratospheric ozone depletion, mercury pollution, and the conservation of biodiversity. The combined studio and laboratory format offers diverse approaches for understanding, applying, and constructing models to investigate the behavior of environmental systems as well as testing hypotheses and drawing conclusions.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Instructor: Griffith

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ES 102
Environment and Society: Addressing Climate Change

This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to Environmental Studies, with a focus on climate change. Major concepts that will be examined include: the state of scientific research, the role of science, politics, and economics in environmental decision-making, and the importance of history, ethics, and justice in approaching climate change. The central aim of the course is to help students develop the interdisciplinary research skills necessary to pose questions, investigate problems, and develop strategies that will help us address our relationship to the environment.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Instructor: Higgins (SP), Turner (FA)

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ES 104Y
First-Year Seminar: How to Save the Planet: Making Change Happen

Fixing environmental problems will require change at all levels – from the habits and beliefs of individuals to the norms in communities, and political decisions locally, nationally and globally. How do individuals, communities, and political structures change? This seminar combines a reading of the social science literature on change with our own efforts to put that information into action. We’ll figure out how to change our own habits, change someone else’s mind, and how to invoke or transform community norms. We’ll experiment with what approaches to political change succeed or fail. We’ll also examine what types of change are most important: does it matter whether people undertake their behavior for the right reasons, or simply that they act in ways that are better for environmental protection? When should we focus on changing behavior by individuals, and when should we focus on changing the structures within which that behavior happens?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: DeSombre

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: No letter grades given.

ES 105Y/ PHIL 105Y
First-Year Seminar: The Ethics of Eating

In this course we will examine the ethics of eating, from farm to table. Students will use philosophical methods to explore ethical issues surrounding topics such as world hunger, industrial agriculture, vegetarianism, cultural identity, paternalism, and individual responsibility. We will focus both on honing our argumentative skills and engaging critically with popular writing about food ethics.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Crosslisted Courses: ES 10 5Y

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Matthes

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Other Categories: FYS - First Year Seminar

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ES 201/ GEOS 201
Environmental, Health, and Sustainability Sciences with Laboratory

Problems in environmental, health, and sustainability sciences are inherently transdisciplinary and require a diverse skill set to frame, analyze, and solve. This course will focus on developing a toolbox of skills including systems level thinking, field and analytical methods, biogeochemical analysis (natural waters, soils, and other environmental materials), and modeling with a goal of building a science-based foundation for the analysis of complex issues at the interface between humans and the environment. Students will conduct semester-long research projects and will present their results in a final poster session.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 18

Crosslisted Courses: ES 20 1

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to students majoring in ES and GEOS who have completed one of the prerequisites, other students by permission of instructor.

Instructor: Brabander

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

ES 212/ RAST 212
Lake Baikal: The Soul of Siberia

The ecological and cultural values of Lake Baikal-the oldest, deepest, and most biotically rich lake on the planet-are examined. Lectures and discussion in spring prepare students for the three-week field laboratory taught at Lake Baikal in eastern Siberia in August. Lectures address the fundamentals of aquatic ecology and the role of Lake Baikal in Russian literature, history, art, music, and the country's environmental movement. Laboratory work is conducted primarily out-of-doors and includes introductions to the flora and fauna, field tests of student-generated hypotheses, meetings with the lake's stakeholders, and tours of ecological and cultural sites surrounding the lake.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Crosslisted Courses: ES 212

Prerequisites: Prerequisite or corequisites - ES 101 or BISC 111; RUSS 101; and permission of the instructors. Application required.

Instructor: Hodge (Russian), Moore (Biology)

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year; Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Not offered every year. Subject to Provost's office approval.

ES 214/ POL2 214
Social Causes and Consequences of Environmental Problems

This course focuses on the social science explanations for why environmental problems are created, the impacts they have, the difficulties of addressing them, and the regulatory and other actions that succeed in mitigating them. Topics include: externalities and the politics of unpriced costs and benefits; collective action problems and interest-group theory; time horizons in decision-making; the politics of science, risk, and uncertainty; comparative political structures; and cooperation theory. Also addressed are different strategies for changing environmental behavior, including command and control measures, taxes, fees, and other market instruments, and voluntary approaches. These will all be examined across multiple countries and levels of governance.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: POL 2214

Prerequisites: ES 102 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: DeSombre

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ES 220
The Ecology of Humans: Environmental Limits and Conservation with Laboratory

Humans and their environment make up a complex and dynamic system. As with all ecological systems, key components are the availability and use of resources and the interactions with other species - both of which have important impacts on the nature and stability of the system itself. This course investigates these far-reaching concepts by examining topics such as the broad implications of thermodynamics, energy and material flows through human and natural systems, natural resource management, and the conservation of resources and biodiversity. We will also explore the role of science and technology in surmounting previous limits (e.g. energy use and agricultural yields), as well as the implications of inherent limits that may never be broken. Laboratory work will focus on quantitative skills and modeling tools used to examine a range of systems.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: ES 100, ES 101, GEOS 101, GEOS 102, BISC 108, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Griffith

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ES 229
Latin America: Topics in Food Systems and the Environment

From an ecological perspective, Latin America is a vast region composed of numerous biomes: tropical forests, savannas, deserts, mountains, and temperate forests and grasslands. Culturally, this region is home to diverse human communities including 600 indigenous groups. Economically, many countries in Latin America depend upon the export of natural resources and agricultural products. Growing populations, increased global trade, and a complicated history of colonization put pressure on all of these areas, creating a fascinating and important backdrop for exploring issues in food systems and the environment. Topics will be guided by student interest, but may include food justice, agroecology, water rights, biodiversity conservation, biopiracy, transnational agreements, farmer networks and social movements.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ES 100, ES 101, ES 102 or ES 103

Instructor: Staff

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ES 233/ PHIL 233
Environmental Ethics

This course will train students to use philosophical methods to engage in rigorous investigation of ethical issues concerning the environment. Topics may include animal rights, the ethics of eating, climate justice, the rights of ecological refugees, obligations to future generations, and the ethics of environmental activism.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: ES 233

Prerequisites: Open to first-year students who have taken one course in philosophy and to sophomores, juniors and seniors without prerequisite.

Instructor: Matthes (Philosophy)

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ES 234/ PHIL 234
From Wilderness to Ruins

This course concerns a range of ethical and aesthetic questions about places, whether of natural or cultural significance. How should we understand the value of nature? Is it relative to human interests, or independent of them? What is nature in the first place, and how is it distinguished from culture? Is scientific or cultural knowledge relevant to the aesthetic experience of nature? Does “natural beauty” have a role to play in guiding environmental preservation? When we seek to preserve an ecosystem or a building, what exactly should we be aiming to preserve? Should the history of a place guide our interactions with it? How should we navigate conflicts between environmental and cultural preservation, especially as they intersect with issues of race and class? How should a changing climate affect our environmental values? We will investigate these questions, among others, in contexts from wilderness to parks, cities to ruins.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 30

Crosslisted Courses: ES 234

Prerequisites: Open to first-years who have taken one course in philosophy. Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors without prerequisite.

Instructor: Matthes

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ES 250
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

ES 250GH
Environmental Studies Reading Group

The Environmental Studies program runs a weekly reading group on changing topics. Readings will be chosen based on the interests of the participating students and faculty members. Students who enroll commit to coming to each week's discussion, preparing a set of responses to the week's reading, and, in collaboration with other group members, selecting some of the weekly topics and readings.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Mandatory credit/noncredit.

ES 250H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

Prerequisites

ES 299/ HIST 299
U.S. Environmental History

This course examines the relationship between nature and society in American history. The course will consider topics such as the decimation of the bison, the rise of Chicago, the history of natural disasters, and the environmental consequences of war. There are three goals for this course: First, we will examine how humans have interacted with nature over time and how nature, in turn, has shaped human society. Second, we will examine how attitudes toward nature have differed among peoples, places, and times, and we will consider how the meanings people give to nature inform their cultural and political activities. Third, we will study how these historical forces have combined to shape the American landscape and the human and natural communities to which it is home. While this course focuses on the past, an important goal is to understand the ways in which history shapes how we understand and value the environment as we do today.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: HIST 299

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Turner

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

ES 300
Environmental Decision-making

An interdisciplinary seminar in which students work together in small groups to understand and develop solutions for current environmental problems. Each year, we focus on a given environmental issue of concern to our community, e.g., environmental implications of building design, energy use, or water quality. In particular, we work to understand its scientific background, the political processes that lead to potential solutions, and the ethical and environmental justice implications. Student-led research provides the bulk of the information about the issue and its role in our local environment; lectures and readings provide supplementary information about the local situation and the global context.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: Completion of four ES-relevant courses or permission of instructor.

Instructor: DeSombre

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ES 312/ POL2 312
Seminar: Environmental Policy

Focuses both on how to make and how to study environmental policy. Examines issues essential in understanding how environmental policy works and explores these topics in depth through case studies of current environmental policy issues. Students will also undertake an original research project and work in groups on influencing or creating local environmental policy.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: POL 2312

Prerequisites: ES 214 or one 200-level unit in political science and permission of the instructor. This course is only open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor: DeSombre

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course

ES 313
Environmental Impact Assessment

Our environment is constantly changing as a result of anthropogenic events; we can apply scientific principles and assessment tools to reduce the adverse impacts that our actions have on the environment. Environmental impact assessment is the systematic identification and evaluation of the potential impacts or effects of proposed projects, products, and decisions relative to the current state of the total environment. This course teaches the scientific fundamentals of environmental impact assessment, along with the related approaches of environmental risk assessment, life cycle assessment, and industrial ecology, that can help us make informed choices about how to minimize environmental harm and about alternatives. These tools will be applied to case studies in class, and a semester-long team project.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: One introductory ES course and one 200-level science course, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Higgins

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ES 325/ POL3 325
International Environmental Law

For international environmental problems, widespread international cooperation is both important and quite difficult. Under what conditions have states been able to cooperate to solve international environmental problems? Most international efforts to address environmental problems involve international law-how does such law function? What types of issues can international environmental law address and what types can it not? This course addresses aspects of international environmental politics as a whole, with particular attention to the international legal structures used to deal with these environmental problems. Each student will additionally become an expert on one international environmental treaty to be researched throughout the course.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Crosslisted Courses: POL 3325

Prerequisites: POL2 214/ES 214 or POL3 221 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: DeSombre

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ES 329
Latin America: Topics in Food and Environment

From an ecological perspective, Latin America is a vast region composed of numerous biomes: tropical forests, savannas, deserts, mountains, and temperate forests and grasslands. Culturally, this region is home to diverse human communities including 600 indigenous groups. Economically, many countries in Latin America depend upon the export of natural resources and agricultural products. Growing populations, increased global trade, and a complicated history of colonization put pressure on all of these areas, creating a fascinating and important backdrop for exploring issues in food systems and the environment. Topics will be guided by student interest, but may include food justice, agroecology, water rights, biodiversity conservation, biopiracy, transnational agreements, farmer networks and social movements.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ES 100, ES 101, ES 102, or ES 103 and permission of instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ES 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

ES 350H
Research or Individual Study

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

ES 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ES 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: ES 360 and permission of the department.

Instructor:

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

ES 381/ POL1 381
U.S. Environmental Politics

This course examines the politics of environmental issues in the United States. The course has two primary goals: First, to introduce students to the institutions, stakeholders, and political processes important to debates over environmental policy at the federal level. Second, to develop and practice skills of analyzing and making decisions relevant to environmental politics and policy. Drawing on the literature of environmental politics and policy, this course will consider how environmental issues are framed in political discourse, various approaches to environmental advocacy and reform, and the contested role of science in environmental politics. The course will be organized around environmental case studies, including endangered species conservation, public lands management, air and water pollution, and toxics regulation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Crosslisted Courses: POL 1381

Prerequisites: A 200-level ES course or POL1 200 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Turner

Distribution Requirements: SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

ES 383
The Science of Compliance: The Evolution of Technology to Meet the Goals of U.S. Environmental Policy

For more than 40 years U.S. environmental policies have been passed, amended, and enforced with the purpose of protecting human health and preserving the environment. This course will examine the evolution of technologies to meet the goals of major U.S. environmental policies including the Clean Air Act, the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act and the role that available technologies play in setting the enforceable standards within policies. We will learn fundamental scientific principles of water treatment, wastewater treatment, and air pollution control technologies and examine how scientists and engineers employ these technologies to meet policy goals. Students will further examine the relationship between a recent or future environmental policy and technological evolution.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: ES 100, ES 101 or ES 220 or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Higgins

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

ES 398
Capstone Scientific Research in Environmental Studies: Knowledge Creation through Collaboration

This course is a science-based capstone experience for Environmental Studies majors. Students will apply interdisciplinary tools learned throughout the ES major to advance an individual project within environmental science (which may connect to research done in lab groups or independent study projects). Class sessions will be conducted as an interdisciplinary science research group devoted to helping students develop their skills framing, conducting, and communicating scientific research. Students will produce deliverables such as literature reviews, research proposals, data analysis workflows and visualizations, demonstrations of research methods/techniques, and approaches to communicate the research project and its importance to different types of audiences. Enrollment in the course is by application.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: A declared major in environmental studies and completion of six courses that count toward the ES major, one of which will be a 200-level science course, or permission of instructor. This course is only open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor: Higgins

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course

ES 399
Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing: Environmental Synthesis and Communication

Tax carbon? Label genetically modified crops? Ban endocrine disruptors? In this course, an interdisciplinary capstone experience for the ES major, we will engage with such questions and related environmental sustainability issues as public writers. Students will choose one environmental issue, which will be the focus of their environmental “beat” during the semester. They will draw on an interdisciplinary toolset from environmental studies to analyze and communicate the scientific, economic, political, and ethical dimensions of pressing policy issues. Students will conduct independent research to produce weekly articles, such as op-eds, blog posts, press releases, book reviews, policy memos, and interviews with environmental professionals. Class sessions will be organized as writing workshops focused on the interdisciplinary analysis and content of student work.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: A declared major in environmental studies and completion of six courses that count toward the ES major, or permission of instructor. This course is only open to juniors and seniors.

Instructor: Turner

Other Categories: CSPW - Calderwood Seminar in Public Writing

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

EXTD 100
Building Intercultural Competence: An Introduction

This seminar is the beginning, or perhaps a continuation, of a life long journey. You will be learning about yourself, about other students in the class, and about interacting with people in the U.S. and in other parts of the world. Classes will consist of a presentation of theories or ideas, as well as group discussion and exercises, to put these theories into practice in real life applications and situations. Self-reflection, experiential learning, and active participation are integral for this process. Cross-cultural studies can be challenging emotionally as well as intellectually but you will be expected to try new ideas, experiment with new behaviors, and learn from your fellow students. You can use the knowledge and skills you gain from this course to enhance your interactions with others outside of the classroom, and in your daily life.

Units: 0.5

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: This course is open to Firstyears and Sophomores.

Instructor: Ines Maturana Sendoya

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EXTD 123
Water Resources Planning and Management

A comprehensive introduction to the economics and ecology of water supply and water pollution control. Topics include watershed management, groundwater and wetlands protection, and wastewater treatment. The inherent difficulty in applying static laws and regulations to a dynamic natural resource such as water is a recurring theme. Offered by the Marine Studies Consortium.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Open to students by permission of the consortium representative, Jocelyne Dolce, Department of Biological Sciences. The course will be taught at the New England Aquarium.

Instructor: Staff

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EXTD 128
Coastal Zone Management

This course presents a survey of the coastal environment and its physical characteristics, natural systems, economic uses, and development pressures. Lectures examine strategies formulated in the United States for land and water-resource management in the coastal zone. The roles of federal, state, and local governments, environmental groups, and resource users are also explored. Finally, by comparing coastal-zone management problems in the United States to those elsewhere in the world, students gain a global perspective. Offered by the Marine Studies Consortium.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 5

Prerequisites: Open to students by permission of the consortium representative, Jocelyne Dolce, Department of Biological Sciences. The course will take place at the New England Aquarium.

Instructor: Staff

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

EXTD 130
Exploring Gender Dynamics in Leadership

Exploring Gender Dynamics in Leadership will help students to develop an understanding of women’s leadership and ways of influencing organizations. Today women are represented in all sectors of society, at all levels and types of organizations. Historically, however, women have had less access to leadership positions than men. This class will examine the personal, social, and structural dynamics that affect women as leaders, particularly in terms of how they are viewed, how their contributions are evaluated, and what kinds of opportunities are available to them. Topics include how gender and leadership are constructed, the leadership styles of men and women, gender and leadership in the workplace, the political sphere, and the global community, and how women succeed as leaders. In this class, students will also explore their own leadership paths and perceptions.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 25

Prerequisites: None

Instructor: Preeta Bannerjee

Typical Periods Offered: Summer

Notes:

EXTD 225
Biology of Fishes

This upper-level survey course covers the evolution, systematics, anatomy, physiology, and behavior of freshwater, marine, and anadromous fishes from temperate to tropical environments. The course also examines the diversity of fish interactions in aquatic communities: predator/prey relationships, host/symbiont interactions, and the various roles of fishes as herbivores. Study of inter- and intra-specific predator-prey relationships among fish populations in aquatic communities integrates principles of ecology. Offered by the Marine Studies Consortium.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 5

Prerequisites: One year of general biology and two upper-level biology courses. Open to students by permission of the consortium representative, Jocelyne Dolce, Department of Biological Sciences. The course will take place at the New England Aquarium.

Instructor: Staff

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

EXTD 226
Biology of Whales

This upper-level course examines the biology and conservation of cetaceans: whales, dolphins, and porpoises. Topics include physiology, population biology, life history analysis, molecular genetics, morphology, distributional ecology, and social behavior. Early lectures focus on the biology of cetaceans and how they are adapted to the marine environment. Subsequent lectures use case studies to review how biological principles can be applied to the conservation of a wide range of cetacean species. Offered by the Marine Studies Consortium.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 5

Prerequisites: One year of general biology and two upper-level biology courses. Open to students by permission of the consortium representative, Jocelyne Dolce, Department of Biological Sciences.

Instructor: Staff

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

EXTD 325
The Individual and Society: Thinking Critically through the Humanities

This course, made up of four units, is focused on critical thinking about the relationship of the individual to society. The aim of the course is to reflect upon this relationship and, in addition, on the notion of citizenship in its broadest terms. Every unit is organized around a master class, or specialized lecture, by a world-renowned thinker, who will visit the Newhouse Center for the Humanities. The course is conceived for students who seek a more active understanding of the tools and methods used in the humanities. Lectures and assignments will guide students to engage in active reflection upon “method” in different disciplines: how we ask questions, gather evidence, interpret materials, and arrive at conclusions. Themes include: cosmopolitanism, family, tragedy, and citizenship.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: None. Open to juniors and seniors of all disciplines.

Instructor: Prabhu

Distribution Requirements: REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 101
Beginning French I

Systematic training in all the language skills, with special emphasis on communication, self-expression, and cultural insights. A multimedia course based on the video series French in Action. Classes are supplemented by regular assignments in a variety of video, audio, print, and Web-based materials to give students practice using authentic French accurately and expressively. Three periods.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: Open to students who do not present French for admission, an equivalent departmental placement score, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBD, Ganne-Schiermeier

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Each semester of FREN 101 and FREN 102 earns one unit of credit; however, students must complete FREN 102 satisfactorily in order to receive credit for FREN 101.

FREN 102
Beginning French II

Systematic training in all the language skills, with special emphasis on communication, self-expression, and cultural insights. A multimedia course based on the video series French in Action. Classes are supplemented by regular assignments in a variety of video, audio, print, and Web-based materials to give students practice using authentic French accurately and expressively. Three periods.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: FREN 101, an equivalent departmental placement score, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: TBD, Ganne-Schiermeier, Lydgate

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Each semester of FREN 101 and FREN 102 earns one unit of credit; however, students must complete FREN 102 satisfactorily in order to receive credit for FREN 101.

FREN 103
Intensive French I

Intensive training in French. FREN 103 covers the material of FREN 101-FREN 102 in a single semester. A blended course: three class periods supplemented by regular required work with online materials. This is a demanding course designed for students interested in taking a junior year or semester abroad. Not recommended for students seeking to fulfill the foreign language requirement in French.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: Open to first-year students and sophomores who do not present French for admission or by permission of the instructor.

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 201
French Language, Literatures, and Cultures

Reading, writing, and speaking skills and critical thinking are developed through analysis and discussion of cultural and literary texts. Issues of cultural diversity, globalization, and identity are considered. Thorough grammar review. Three 70-minute periods a week.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: FREN 102 or FREN 103, an equivalent departmental placement score, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Prabhu,Tranvouez, Ganne-Schiermeier, TBD

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: Each semester of FREN 201 and FREN 202 earns one unit of credit; however, students must complete FREN 202 satisfactorily in order to receive credit for FREN 201. Students are strongly advised to complete the FREN 201-FREN 202 sequence early in their college career, and within the same academic year, and in order to ensure they receive credit for both courses they should consult the chair of the department if they foresee a gap in their enrollment in the sequence. A student who takes FREN 202 without having completed FREN 201 must elect one of the following courses in order to complete the language requirement

FREN 202
French Language, Literatures, and Cultures

Reading, writing, and speaking skills and critical thinking are developed through analysis and discussion of cultural and literary texts. Issues of cultural diversity, globalization and identity are considered. Thorough grammar review. Three 70-minute periods a week.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: FREN 201, an equivalent departmental placement score, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Tranvouez, Ganne-Schiermeier

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Each semester of FREN 201 and FREN 202 earns one unit of credit; however, students must complete FREN 202 satisfactorily in order to receive credit for FREN 201. Students are strongly advised to complete the FREN 201-FREN 202 sequence early in their college career, and within the same academic year, and in order to ensure they receive credit for both courses they should consult the chair of the department if they foresee a gap in their enrollment in the sequence. A student takes FREN 202 without having completed FREN 201 must elect one of the following courses in order to complete the language requirement

FREN 203
Intensive French II

The continuation of FREN 103. Systematic training in all the language skills. A blended course: three class periods supplemented by regular required work with online materials.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 18

Prerequisites: The course is equivalent to FREN 201-FREN 202, and is designed to prepare students to qualify for international study after two further courses in French - a unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or FREN 215, and a unit of FREN 210, FREN 211 or FREN 212.

Instructor:

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

FREN 205
Literature and Film in Cultural Contexts

Discussion of modern literature and film in their cultural contexts. Training in techniques of literary and cultural analysis. Materials include novels, short stories, poetry, films, screenplays, and videos from France and the Francophone world. Vocabulary building and review of key points of grammar. Frequent written practice. Attention to oral skills and listening comprehension, as needed.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: FREN 202 or FREN 203, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Datta

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

FREN 206
Intermediate Spoken French

This course develops the skills of listening and speaking in French, with special emphasis on pronunciation and attention to the related skills of reading, writing, and grammatical accuracy. Participants will practice conversation through discussion of a wide variety of materials, including websites, magazine articles, short stories and films.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: FREN 202, FREN 203, or FREN 205, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Tranvouez

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes:

FREN 207
Perspectives on French Culture and Society: French Identity in the Age of Globalization

In this introduction to French society and culture, we will examine France's identity crisis in the twenty-first century. From its historical position of political, economic, and intellectual leadership in Europe and the world, France is searching to maintain its difference as a defender of quality over mass appeal and the proud values of its national tradition in the face of increasing globalization. Topics covered include Franco-American relations, the European Union, immigration, the family, and the role of women in French society. Readings are drawn from a variety of sources: historical, sociological, and ethnographic. Magazine and newspaper articles along with television programs and films will provide supplementary information.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: FREN 202, FREN 203, or FREN 205, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Gunther

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

FREN 208
Women and Literary Tradition

Highlighting what historians of literature have traditionally referred to as the "singularity" of women's writing, the course will examine women writers' tendency to break with social language and literary codes, to challenge the characteristic attitudes, ideas, and conventions of the dominant tradition of men's writing. We will study not only familiar genres such as the novel and poetry, but also less "mainstream" ones: fairy tales and letters. We will view these women not as the object of man's desire or discourse, but as subjects thinking and creating independently, expressing their desires, their wishes for themselves and humanity, their vision of society and the world, their own experience of love, power and powerlessness. Special attention is given to the continuities among women writers and to the impact of their minority status upon their writing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: FREN 202, FREN 203, or FREN 205, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Masson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 209
Studies in Literature and Film

Topic for Fall 2019: Cannes: The French Film Festival


Topic for Spring 2020:

Topic for Fall 2019: Cannes: The French Film Festival

How did it happen that a minor festival in a town on the Côte d’Azur developed and came to gain world-wide recognition, rivaling the Oscars in matters of glamour, star allure, and cinematic cachet? Exploring the history of the Cannes Film Festival through a diverse array of published and audio-visual materials, this course will foster student fluency in written and spoken French. The history of this annual event and its formative role in the French film culture will be examined through French radio shows, newspapers reports, magazine and TV coverage, along with selected films, memoirs, and a graphic novel.

Topic for Spring 2020:  The Paris of Poets

A study of the city of Paris as urban inspiration for French poetry, with an emphasis on speaking and writing skills. This course explores the visual arts, culture and history of the City of Light as represented and celebrated through French poetry. Special attention is paid to Parisian artistic and poetic life during the late nineteenth-century to the present.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: FREN 202, FREN 203, or FREN 205, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Morari (Fall), Petterson (Spring)

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

FREN 210
From the Middle Ages through the Enlightenment

Major authors from the Medieval period through the Enlightenment studied in their historical and cultural contexts, with emphasis on close reading, critical analysis, and writing in French. Attention to literary genres, including the constraints and innovations they engender, and study of key notions that will inform students' understanding of French literature and history-galanterie, courtoisie, mimesis, poetics, epistolarity, Salic law, French Wars of Religion, the Edict of Nantes, and Absolutism. We will end with consideration of pre-revolutionary works, anticipating the rise of the French Republic.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Bilis

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: For students entering before fall 2017, FREN 210, FREN 211, or FREN 212 fulfills the 200-level requirement for the major and for all French Department courses at the 300 level. For students entering in fall 2017 or later, FREN 210 or FREN 212 fulfills the 200-level requirement for the major and for all French Department courses at the 300 level. Any course FREN 210 or above satisfies the requirement for study abroad. Majors should consult with a member of the French Department to determine which course best suits their needs.

FREN 211
Studies in Language

Students in this course will explore works of prose, poetry, fiction and autobiography and acquire the skills and techniques needed to decipher and analyze them in writing. A writing-intensive course, in which participants learn to produce a reaction paper, an essay, a creative narration, textual analysis of a poem, and a sustained argument. Special emphasis on critical thinking and interpretive judgment. Students will learn to construct logical, well thought-out essays, including the dialectical essay (la dissertation) practiced in French universities. An ongoing, intensive review of grammar underlies and anchors the course. Open to first-year students who have taken one of the prerequisite courses.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Tranvouez

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: For students entering before fall 2017, FREN 210, FREN 211, or FREN 212 fulfills the 200-level requirement for the major and for all French Department courses at the 300 level. For students entering in fall 2017 or later, FREN 210 or FREN 212 fulfills the 200-level requirement for the major and for all French Department courses at the 300 level. Any course FREN 210 or above satisfies the requirement for study abroad. Majors should consult with a member of the French Department to determine which course best suits their needs.

FREN 212
From Classicism to Present Day: French Literature & Culture Through the Centuries

Major authors from the eighteenth century to the twenty-first, studied in their historical and cultural contexts, with emphasis on close reading, critical analysis, and writing in French. Literary generations and movements, from the philosopher-writers of the Enlightenment through the nineteenth-century innovations of the romantic and realist writers, to groundbreaking twentieth-century experiments in prose, poetry and theater, and the painful disillusionment of the Second World War. Concluding with readings in new directions in French literature. A key course for appreciating and understanding the materials in all our courses and one that prepares students to study abroad. 

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Petterson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes: For students entering before fall 2017, FREN 210, FREN 211, or FREN 212 fulfills the 200-level requirement for the major and for all French Department courses at the 300 level. For students entering in fall 2017 or later, FREN 210 or FREN 212 fulfills the 200-level requirement for the major and for all French Department courses at the 300 level. Any course FREN 210 or above satisfies the requirement for study abroad. Majors should consult with a member of the French Department to determine which course best suits their needs.

FREN 213
From Myth to the Absurd: French Drama in the Twentieth Century

An investigation of the major trends in modern French drama: the reinterpretation of myths, the influence of existentialism, and the theatre of the absurd. Special attention is given to the nature of dramatic conflict and to the relationship between text and performance. Study of plays by Anouilh, Cocteau, Giraudoux, Sartre, Camus, Ionesco, Beckett, and Genet.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Masson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 217
Books of the Self

This course focuses on texts that seek to reveal the reality of the self in the space of a book, including readings of confessional and autobiographical works by the twentieth-century writers Camus, Annie Ernaux, Roland Barthes, and Maryse Condé, and by their literary ancestors Augustine, Abélard, Montaigne, and Rousseau. Themes examined include: the compulsion to confess; secret sharing versus public self-disclosure; love, desire, and language; the search for authenticity; dominant discourse and minority voices; the role of the reader as accomplice, witness, judge, confessor.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Lydgate

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; REP - Religion, Ethics, and Moral Philosophy

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 218
Women in Postcolonial "French" Africa: After Négritude

Male elites in postcolonial Africa dominated the independence era with liberation movements such as "négritude." Women's position in both public culture and private spaces was ambiguous, rapidly changing, even contentious. Our study of a variety of media, while placing literary texts at the center, will seek to understand the place of women in the Francophone context and in postcolonial nations more widely.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Prabhu

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

FREN 220
Decoding the French

This course offers students analytical tools for interpreting French history, society, and culture. The first part of the course focuses on the approaches that social science disciplines (history, anthropology, sociology) and theoretical frameworks (semiotics, Marxism, structuralism, cultural history, queer theory) have used to analyze French social phenomena. Short excerpts of texts by Claude Lévi-Strauss, Pierre Bourdieu, Roland Barthes, Algirdas Julien Greimas, Natalie Zemon-Davis, Michel Foucault, Lynn Hunt, Pierre Nora, Robert Darnton, Joan Scott and others will orient our discussions. In the second part of the course, students use these different approaches to examine the ways in which terms such as “nation,” “class,” “secularism,” and “gender” take on distinct meanings in the French context.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Gunther

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Ann E. Maurer '51 Speaking Intensive Course.

FREN 221
Love and Madness in French Poetry from François Villon to the Present

An overview of the themes of love, madness, and death in French poetry from François Villon to the present, with specific attention to the ways these themes are embodied in poetic form. In which ways is poetry most apt to address and express the passions of the human heart and mind?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Petterson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

FREN 222
French Cinema from the Lumière Brothers to the Present: The Formation of Modernity

This course offers a critical panorama of French cinema while also building essential vocabulary and critical concepts for film analysis. Students will pay specific attention to the various connections between cinema, urban space, and notions of modernity. Close analyses of clips in class will also lead to a deeper appreciation of genre and technical aspects in the history of cinema. Filmmakers studied will include the Lumière Brothers (for the “perspective” model), Georges Méliès (for the cinema of attraction), Jean Renoir (for depth of field), Robert Bresson (for literary adaptation), Jean-Luc Godard (for traveling shots and direct sound), and Chris Marker (for documentary).

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Morari

Distribution Requirements: ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

FREN 224
Versailles and the Age of Louis XIV

Louis XIV sought to present his royal court at Versailles as the ultimate in monarchical splendor and power. Yet writers who frequented the court focus on its dangerous intrigues, moral corruption, and petty rivalries. The course will explore this discrepancy through close study of official and unofficial productions of the court. Royal paintings, medallions, architecture, ceremonies, and official historiography all foreground the Sun King's glory; novels, memoirs, letters, and moral treatises seem to undo the very notions of courtly magnificence put forward by the monarchy. Both elements are crucial to understanding the social, political, religious, and artistic practices that defined the court. Recent films and historical works on Versailles will help us evaluate its legacy for contemporary French culture.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Bilis

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 225
The French Press

This course is designed for students who want to become more familiar with the French media, to keep up with current events, and to know more about the differences between the perspectives of French and American news sources with regard to current issues. The course is also intended to improve students' reading, writing, and speaking skills in French.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Gunther

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; SBA - Social and Behavioral Analysis

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 226
Speaking Through Acting

Improvement of French oral skills and public speaking skills through the use of acting techniques. Intensive analysis of short literary texts and excerpts from several plays with emphasis on pronunciation, diction, elocution, acting, and staging.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Masson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

FREN 227
Black Paris: "Postcolonializing" the Seine (in English)

A study of contemporary immigrant experience in Paris through a range of media and an historical perspective. Materials will comprise text and still and moving images. What are some of the dominant themes and emotions in the self-representation of immigrants in Paris today? How were Africans (in particular) represented during the colonial period in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and how did Africans represent themselves on the rare occasions they had to do so then? How do we understand France's precarious, and often volatile, positioning of immigrants in its society today?

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 16

Prerequisites: One writing class, or by permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Prabhu

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 228
Paris, CinéCity: French Film Culture and Its Institutions

This course focuses on the institutions of French film culture and the places they assume in an increasingly digital world. With its 88 cinemas, in addition to the Cinémathèque Française, film archives, film museums, and ciné-clubs, Paris is by far the most cinephilic city on the planet. To understand its film culture, one has to look more closely into the spaces that constitute cinema theaters, those physical sites where film functions within the larger socio-economic dynamics of the world at large. The course will examine the ways in which films are circulated, how they are seen, shared and experienced, as well as the ways in which they figure in the city’s policies. Readings on the history of the key film institutions and their seminal role in French history will accompany on-site visits and archival research to be conducted during the two weeks in Paris. During the course’s third week on the Wellesley campus, students will complete an oral presentation and a final paper.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Morari

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 229
America Through French Eyes: Perceptions and Realities

The French have long been fascinated by the United States, especially since the end of the Second World War. At times, the United States has been seen as a model to be emulated in France; more often, it has stood out as the antithesis of French culture and values. This course examines French representations of the United States and of Americans through key historical and literary texts-essays, autobiographies, and fiction-as well as films. Topics to be explored include: representations of African Americans in French films (Josephine Baker), French views of Taylorization, the Coca-Cola wars of the 1950s, French-American tensions during the Cold War, especially under de Gaulle, as well as more recent debates about Euro Disney, McDonald's, Hollywood, globalization, and multiculturalism.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Datta

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

FREN 232
Occupation and Resistance: The French Memory and Experience of World War II

Few experiences in recent French history have marked French collective memory as profoundly as World War II. During these years, the French dealt not only with the trauma of defeat and the German Occupation, but also with the divisive legacy of the collaborationist Vichy regime, headed by Marshal Philippe Pétain, a revered World War I hero. Memories of the war have continued to mark the public imagination to the present day, manifesting themselves in the various arenas of French national life. This course examines the history and memory of the French experience of World War II through historical documents, memoirs, films, literature, and songs.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Datta

Distribution Requirements: HS - Historical Studies; LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Fall and Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

FREN 233
A Passionate Cinema: French Bodies on Screen

This course takes a historical approach to the representation of love, desire, and the body in French cinema. Although tales of love and desire are a source of commercial success for film directors and producers everywhere, in France they created aesthetic, historical, and ideological patterns that led to the creation of a French national cinema. We will examine how, by implementing the contemporary perspective on desire, French filmmakers built a national style clearly distinguishable from, even opposed to, mainstream (Hollywood) cinema in four important aspects: lighting, narrative codes, editing, and voice-over. Weekly screenings will cover poetic realism (1930s: Vigo, Renoir, Carné, Duvivier, Grémillon), nouvelle vague (Godard, Malle, Truffaut), women's cinema (Breillat, Denis, Akerman), and new French cinema (1990 and 2000: Assayas, Garrel, Téchiné).

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Morari

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 278
Court, City, Salon: Early Modern Paris—A Digital Humanities Approach

Court, city, salon: these are the spaces where notions of good taste and sound judgment, still crucial to French identity today, took root, and where the European Republic of Letters emerged. Students will explore the culture and literature of these milieus through the lens of digital humanities' methods and theories, combining study and praxis of such new approaches. The intersection of traditional scholarship with digital humanities applications will enable students to investigate if, and how, DH methods can broaden, confirm, disprove or reinterpret dominant analyses of the influential spaces of early modern Paris.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: At least one unit of FREN 206, FREN 207, FREN 208, FREN 209 or above, or an equivalent departmental placement score.

Instructor: Bilis

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 302
Discourses of Desire in the Renaissance

An exploration of ways in which writers of the sixteenth century in France express and explore the desire for transcendence in spiritual and physical experience. Convinced that the texts of antiquity contain occult teachings, scholars of the early Renaissance seek to purge ancient books of their medieval commentaries and the corruptions of centuries of manuscript culture, and pore over astrological and hermetic treatises. Religious reformers pursue an analogous purification of the sacred texts, intent on restoring the lost inwardness and otherworldliness of Christian faith. Poets and prose writers challenge the rigid medieval dichotomy between the unsensual spirit and the unspiritual body, casting a newly loving eye on physical beauty and finding in human desire a privileged expression of the quest for intellectual and spiritual meaning. We will investigate these issues in works by Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Calvin, Ronsard, Louise Labé, Montaigne, and Agrippa d'Aubigné.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Lydgate

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 303
Advanced Studies in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Bilis

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 305
Six Degrees of Marie-Antoinette: Social Networks and the French Revolution

The men-and women-who made up what we refer to today as the “Age of Enlightenment” hailed from a surprising variety of backgrounds ranging from the halls of Versailles, Parisian cafés, provincial Academies, to the literary underground of pornographers and pamphleteers. Starting from the premise that cultural transformations are achieved through social connections, this course will examine Ancien Régime fictional, historical, and political networks as a means of understanding the origins of the French Revolution. This course will introduce students to the concept of social networks as a sociological theory and as a recent digital humanities approach. Through experimentation with, and critique of, existing Digital Humanities projects, students will understand network theory as a means to analyze the social structures of historical actors and literary characters. No previous digital humanities experience required.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Bilis, O'Brien

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

FREN 306
Literature and Inhumanity: Novel, Poetry, and Film in Interwar France

This course will examine the confrontation between literature and inhumanity through the French literature, poetry, and film of the early twentieth century. Poetry by Guillaume Apollinaire, Robert Desnos, André Breton, Francis Ponge, and René Char, films by Luis Buñuel, and novels by André Gide, Jean-Paul Sartre, and André Malraux all serve to illustrate the profound crisis in human values that defined and shaped the twentieth century.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Petterson

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

FREN 307
The Contemporary French Novel and the "Pleasure of the Text"

In mental landscapes ranging from the personal to the impersonal, and in geographical settings that vary from high-paced urbanism to plodding ruralism, the contemporary French novel invites reassessment of the formal, political, cultural and historical stakes of writing and reading fiction in the twenty-first century. This course explores the subtle pleasure of the text in works by some of France's more brilliant contemporary writers: Marie Redonnet, Jean-Philippe Toussaint, François Bon, Patrick Modiano, Annie Saumont, Laurent Mauvignier, Jean Echenoz.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Petterson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 308
French Translation Studies - Translating in the 21st Century

This course introduces students to the main theories and practices of translation and it provides a deep understanding of the ways translating can enrich one's own critical reading and writing processes. Practical training in translation between French and English is paired with readings from the major theories of translation from Cicero to the present, with further focus on contemporary applications of translation.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 20

Prerequisites: One unit of FREN 210 or above, or by permission of the instructor

Instructor: Petterson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 313
George Sand: The Novelist as Playwright

Novelist George Sand often stated that it was far more difficult to write plays than novels. In addition to laying bare the dramatic aesthetic of a pivotal 19th-century writer, this course will afford an in-depth understanding of her ideals and ideas. We will examine the evolution of her self-adaptations, specifically her rewriting of stories from novels into plays. We will also discuss her adaptation of dramatic works of other authors from a variety of countries and eras, including works by Shakespeare, Hoffmann, Tirso de Molina, and plays inspired by the commedia dell'arte.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Masson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

FREN 314
A Cinematic History of Intellectual Ideas in Post-WWII France: The Politics of Art

This course examines the various ideological turns and patterns in post-World War II France through the study of cinema. Proceeding from the assumption that aesthetics and politics are intertwined, the course will focus on form and content in order to examine the political engagement of filmmakers, overtly militant cinema, propaganda, and the shaping of moral spectatorship, in parallel with specific trends in French intellectual and political history. Our focus will be on the films of Alain Resnais, Jean-Luc Godard, Agnès Varda, Chantal Akerman, Claude Chabrol, Mathieu Kassovitz, and Abdel Kechiche. Readings will include contemporary political philosophers Jacques Rancière, Alain Badiou, and Étienne Balibar.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Morari

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; ARS - Visual Arts, Music, Theater, Film and Video

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 323
Liberty, Equality, Sexualities: How the Values of the French Republic Have Both Protected and Limited Sexual Freedom

An examination of sexualities and genders in France, from the ancien régime to the present, that signifies the ways in which sexuality and gender have been conceptualized differently in France than in places like the United States. At the end of the semester, the course will focus on recent changes in discussions of gender and sexuality and address the issue of whether traditional paradigms for explaining gender and sexuality in France still apply or whether the French might be entering a new sexual era.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Gunther

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

FREN 324
The Belle Epoque and the Emergence of Modern France

The term belle époque (1880-1914) evokes images of Parisian boulevards, bustling cafés, glittering shop windows, and Montmartre cabarets, all symbols of modern consumer culture. No emblem of the era is as iconic as the Eiffel Tower, constructed for the World's Fair of 1889 as a tribute to French technology and progress. During the years preceding World War I, Paris was the center of the European avant-garde-indeed, the capital of modernity. While cultural ebullience is its hallmark, this period also witnessed the definitive establishment of a republican regime, the expansion of an overseas empire, and the integration of the countryside into national life. Drawing on historical documents and literary texts as well as films, posters, and songs, this interdisciplinary course examines French culture, politics, and society during the era that ushered France into the modern age.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Datta

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

FREN 332
Myth and Memory in Modern France: From the French Revolution to May 1968

This course explores the way in which the French view their past as well as the myths they have created to inscribe that past into national memory. Through an approach simultaneously thematic and chronological, modern French history and culture will be examined from the perspective of les lieux de mémoire, that is, symbolic events (Bastille Day), institutions (the Napoleonic Code), people (Joan of Arc), and places (Sacré-Coeur) that have shaped French national identity. The course begins by analyzing such concepts as the nation and the hexagon, and proceeds to the legacy of key moments in French history, among them the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era, the establishment of the Third Republic, the two World Wars, the Algerian conflict, and the events of May 1968.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Datta

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature; HS - Historical Studies

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes:

FREN 333
French Classical Tragedy: Corneille versus Racine: Rethinking the Parallel

Ever since La Bruyère's famous comment on Corneille and Racine-“The first depicts men as they should be, the second as they are”-critics have been tireless in pitting the two French tragedians against each other. In this course, we will take a critical look at the archetypal Corneille-Racine parallel in the light of important but marginalized playwrights such as Jean Rotrou, Tristan l'Hermite, and Catherine Bernard, whose works do not fit standard definitions of Classicism and tragedy. This encounter will lead us to question the notion of auteurs classiques and the seventeenth century's status as the “Grand Siècle.” We will explore the many variations on the Corneille-Racine theme, asking if there is a “grand Corneille” and a “tender Racine,” and considering why in certain historical periods one playwright was considered to encapsulate “French values” and patriotism more than the other. Students will become familiar with an array of seventeenth-century tragedies and reflect on the process and politics of literary canonization.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Bilis

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

FREN 356
The French Love Affair with Shakespeare

In this experimental seminar, we will examine the reception and impact William Shakespeare’s plays have had in France from the 18th century to the present day. In all, 85 translators have so far adapted the Bard’s works for the French stage. We begin by discussing Voltaire’s reading of Shakespeare’s plays and the adaptations he himself made of them. Then, we examine how Stendhal’s and Hugo’s readings of the Bard influenced French romantic drama. We will investigate how English actors performing Shakespeare in Paris in the 19th century radically changed acting on French stages. Finally, we will analyze the art and practice of translation and adaptation by comparing different versions of several French renderings of Shakespeare’s plays.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 12

Prerequisites: FREN 210 or FREN 212; and one additional unit, FREN 213 or above.

Instructor: Masson

Distribution Requirements: LL - Language and Literature

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

FREN 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

FREN 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: FREN 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

FRST 350
Research or Individual Study

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and seniors.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

FRST 360
Senior Thesis Research

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: Permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

FRST 370
Senior Thesis

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 15

Prerequisites: FRST 360 and permission of the department.

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring; Fall

Notes: Students enroll in Senior Thesis Research (360) in the first semester and carry out independent work under the supervision of a faculty member. If sufficient progress is made, students may continue with Senior Thesis (370) in the second semester.

GEOS 101
Earth Processes and the Environment with Laboratory

Geologic processes both rapid (earthquakes and landslides) and slow (mountain building and sea level rise) are intimately linked with sustaining the diversity of life on the planet. This course examines processes linked with the flow of energy and mass between the atmosphere, geosphere, and biosphere. Laboratory exercises, field trips, and a semester-long research project provide authentic experiences to develop the skills needed to observe and model processes shaping our environment. Problem solving in small groups during class time fosters critical thinking and classroom debates between larger teams focus on research and communications skills by examining current issues in geosciences such as building and removing dams, and the science surrounding global climate change.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 38

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken ASTR 120 or a 100-level GEOS course.

Instructor: Brabander

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Degree Requirements: QRF - Quantitative Reasoning - Overlay

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

GEOS 102
The Dynamic Earth with Laboratory

The Earth is a dynamic planet where change is driven by processes that operate within its interior and on its surface. In this course we study these processes as well as interactions between the solid earth, the hydrosphere, the atmosphere, and the biosphere that together produce the environment we live in and influence our daily lives. Topics covered include the origin and history of the Earth, plate tectonics, deep time, the materials that make up the solid earth, the distribution of earthquakes and volcanoes, hydrology, landscape evolution, and global climate. Laboratory exercises, project work, and local field trips provide hands-on opportunities to develop key concepts and hone observational and analytical skills.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 30

Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the basic skills component of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement. Not open to students who have taken ASTR 120 or a 100-level GEOS course.

Instructor: Monecke, Brabander, Staff

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring; Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall; Spring

Notes:

GEOS 200
Evolution of Earth Systems through Time with Field Laboratory

The geologic record, covering 4.6 billion years, provides us with a long-term perspective of the Earth system and how it operates over time scales much longer than human history. Using Wellesley’s extensive rock and fossil collection, geologic data sets and journal articles, we will reconstruct and interpret Earth's eventful past, including periods of mountain building, dramatic climate changes, and the evolution and extinction of life on our planet. This class should give students an understanding about deep time and that we live on an ever changing planet.

The lab component of this class will be entirely in the field. We will visit key geologic outcrops that represent a large part of Earth history. We will explore the regional geology in New England and Upstate New York during three weekends throughout the semester (one half day, one full day and one two day trip). The class will conclude with a 5-day field trip to the southwestern United States in mid-May.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Any 100-level GEOS course.

Instructor: Monecke

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

Notes:

GEOS 203
Earth Materials with Laboratory

An introduction to the materials-minerals, rocks, magmas, sediments-that make up the Earth, and how those materials influence the processes that operate within and on the surface of the Earth. Emphasis is placed on the geological, chemical, and physical basis for understanding the physical properties and chemical composition of minerals, magmas, rocks, and sediments, and the processes by which these materials form. Lecture and laboratory sessions are integrated to create a seamless, studio-style setting for active-learning experiences.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Any 100-level GEOS course.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes:

GEOS 208
Oceanography

The Earth is an ocean planet. Covering 71 percent of the Earth's surface and holding 97 percent of the Earth's water, the oceans are perhaps our planet's most distinctive feature. This course will address fundamental questions about the oceans such as, why do we have oceans and ocean basins? Why do we have ocean currents? How have the interactions among physical, chemical, and biological processes produced the ocean we have today? Why should we strive to learn more about the oceans, and what are the links between the oceans and Earth's climate? In-class exercises, case studies, and data analysis will emphasize fundamental oceanographic processes and problem solving skills. A mandatory field trip to the coast will allow students to explore coastal processes in action.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 28

Prerequisites: Any 100-level GEOS, ES, or BISC course, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Palevsky

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Fall

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

GEOS 210
Hydrogeology: Water and Pollutants with Laboratory

Clean water supply is a high priority for both developed and underdeveloped communities worldwide. Limits to supply and their implications for an increasing population make a clear understanding essential for citizens. Water sources and movement of water from the atmosphere through the earth's surface and subsurface will be examined. Laboratory will include field and laboratory analyses of physical and chemical properties and pollutant issues of local community supplies including the Wellesley campus, and Towns of Wellesley, Natick, and Norwell.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 10

Prerequisites: Any 100-level GEOS course (except GEOS 111), or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Staff

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Every other year

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Not Offered

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

GEOS 215
Earth System Data Science

In this course, students will learn to visualize and map earth system data across broad spatial and temporal scales, and apply statistical tools to analyze trends and variability in regional and global datasets. These skills are increasingly an important part of earth system science, which depends on analysis of large data sets from observations, satellite remote sensing, and numerical model output to address problems such as global climate change. Students will practice these skills in a series of MATLAB data analysis assignments focused on regional and global climate data such as temperature, precipitation, and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, and will apply them in a collaborative final research project addressing earth system science questions of their own choosing.

Units: 1

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Any 100-level course in GEOS, BISC, ES, or CS, or permission of the instructor.

Instructor: Palevesky

Distribution Requirements: MM - Mathematical Modeling and Problem Solving; NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences

Typical Periods Offered: Spring

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Spring

GEOS 218
Geomorphology with Laboratory

The Earth's surface is constantly changing and is controlled by the interaction of topography and climate. In this class we will investigate the major landforms that can be found on Earth's surface, the processes that have shaped them, the delicate balance between landform and process, and the rates of geomorphic change. Among other processes, we will explore glacial activity, coastal processes, landslides, and stream flow. Topographic maps, surveying equipment, and geographic information systems (GIS) will be used to analyze and interpret geomorphic features. A variety of landforms will be studied during outdoor lab exercises and two one-day weekend field trips.

Units: 1.25

Max Enrollment: 14

Prerequisites: Any 100-level GEOS course.

Instructor: Monecke

Distribution Requirements: NPS - Natural and Physical Sciences; LAB - Natural and Physical Sciences Laboratory

Semesters Offered this Academic Year: Fall

Notes: Normally offered in alternate years.

GEOS 220
Volcanoes and Volcanism with Laboratory

Volcanic eruptions provide insights into the inner workings of planet Earth and impact the environment. In this course we will examine volcanic landforms, eruptions, products and hazards, as well as, the tectonic causes of and the magmatic processes that drive volcanism. We will also explore the impact of volcanism through time on the earth and ecosystems. Lecture and laboratory sessions are integrated t